Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I guess what I'm concerned about is setting her back with the progress we have made by working with her to boost her confidence.

She started as a really timid girl, and at the first few days here at home she would bolt into her kennel whenever my husband or teenage son would come into the room. That was at 8 weeks old. Over the past 14 weeks, we've worked really hard to socialize her and introduce her to many people starting with our neighbors, and working our way to stores. She's still cautious when she meets someone new, but usually will say hello if we tell her, "it's ok."

Our vet keeps the pups overnight, which I understand is necessary, however, I worry that her being in an unfamiliar place overnight will cause her to lose her trust she has in us.

Anyone out there have any experience with shy pups that have been separated from their homes overnight?
 

·
u mad?
Joined
·
6,476 Posts
I personally think that the occasional night away is a good thing. The pup learns that they can be OK without you around (even if they don't want to be) and they'll be SUPER excited to see you the next day and will learn that you will come back for them.

From working in boarding, most shy dogs I knew were completely fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for that. You're right, she will learn that I will come back for her. :)That makes me feel a little better about it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
675 Posts
You know your puppy better than anyone else does; so do what you feel is right.

Why do you neuter?

This is a thread on the pros/cons of spay/neuter; and, the best age.

A lot of Breeders want you to wait until 18 months when the puppy is finished growing and the growth plates have closed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,009 Posts
My girl went into emergency surgery at 9.5 years old...crated and on IV, she never stopped crying (all night & morning), until I came in to sit with her.

Last year Amy had a mollar tooth removed, and I insisted she be morning operation #1 and I brought her home the same day.
I sat on the floor with her for 5 hours, in recovery.
Amy came home at super time, the same day, even before her back legs had regained strength...but Vet knew our dog needed to be home, and she recovered fast.

IsaBELLA1 - Why does your girl Bella need to stay at Vets, the day before surgery ??
- would not be to my liking
Like Dictator said...18 month is best and so is between heat cycles...re. hormone balance.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,405 Posts
I would reconsider the spay at this time, and possibly the vet.

There is no reason to keep her overnight. Does she have vWD?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,784 Posts
IsaBELLA1 - Why does your girl Bella need to stay at Vets, the day before surgery ??
- would not be to my liking
Like Dictator said...18 month is best and so is between heat cycles...re. hormone balance.
I don't think she is being kept overnight the day before surgery, but being kept overnight after the surgery. For the most part, I've been able to bring mine home the day of surgery especially if they had their surgery in the a.m.; you might ask your vet if this is an option. I would also reconsider and let your girl have one heat cycle and then spay her a couple of months after that.

Jan
 
  • Like
Reactions: Beaumont67

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,405 Posts
I personally think that the occasional night away is a good thing. The pup learns that they can be OK without you around (even if they don't want to be) and they'll be SUPER excited to see you the next day and will learn that you will come back for them.

From working in boarding, most shy dogs I knew were completely fine.
I agree, but is this a 24hr clinic?

ETA: In 35 years, I've never had a spay stay overnight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,784 Posts
I agree, but is this a 24hr clinic?

ETA: In 35 years, I've never had a spay stay overnight.
This would be my concern, too! My vet is not a 24-hour clinic and animals kept overnight are only checked on a few times throughout the night unless they're critical and then a vet spends the night there or they transfer them to the emergency clinic.

Jan
 
  • Like
Reactions: EmilyB

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,405 Posts
I should add about the 35 year comment......because I laughed when I read that back.......certainly not about the number of females, maybe 4, but the history of vet care. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Others here are far more experienced than I on the appropriate age to spay, so I would research that. I will be doing so as well in regards to our little girl and the best time to spay her.

About the over night stay....do they want her to stay the night before or the night of surgery? One of the vets I consulted with for an ear crop wanted to keep Raz the night before. I asked the reasoning behind it because I too worried about the stress it would cause her. The only reason was to ensure she hadn't eaten after mid-night! He was fine with me just bringing her in early in the morning as long as I could gaurantee she didn't eat after mid-night.

An interesting little side note....
This same vet said he agreed to let a guy bring in his GSD early in the morning instead of staying over night as long as he kept food out of her reach. He said that as soon as the GSD came out of surgery and woke up, she vomited up a baby goat!! In about 8 seperate chunks! So I guess they have their reasons for their protocol!...poor baby goat :(
 

·
Luv-The-Nub
Joined
·
1,058 Posts
Hopefully she has to stay post op (not common, but anyway...) I would allow it if there was someone there 24 hr, otherwise no. That said and assumed, try to meet the tech that will be with your girl let her know your concerns and if she would take the shyness into consideration :)
 

·
Got mutt?
Joined
·
13,848 Posts
The vet I worked for in Oklahoma always kept spays and neuters overnight after their surgery. He felt that most owners would be uncormfortable with their pet staggering around in a post-anesthetic haze (cats especially). Also, it allowed us to check incisions before the went home, and also make sure the animals were bright and alert.

The only problem we ever had with that arrangement was one Dachshund who did not want to wake up. Since he was breathing fine, on the vet's orders, I took home with me to watch. Ater several more consults with the vet, I took over to the main hospital for observation and fluids. He recovered just fine.

When I moved down here, and had to use a new vet, I was rather shocked when I was told to pick my pet up the same day as their surgery.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top