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my 16 year old daughter's best friend tested positive for the omicron variant - they hung out yesterday - so now we are waiting to see if our daughter has the virus - doing the rapid test tomorrow morning - - she's quarantine in her room
- her boy friend comes over with a gift bag - knocking at her bedroom window and the same time i'm taking out my 5 month dob pup for a pee -she goes absolutely crazy - had a hard time holding her back - i sometimes tie her on her up on a long 50foot leash that is tied up to a tree as she likes to walk around and hang out for a while - i'm glad i didn't - don't know what would have happened?? -
takes me back to this incident .....
- i have had boxers and my last one - Boo- who ran like a kangaroo - the runt of the litter - we were on a trail and i came across a couple who had a black lab - we were talking and all of a sudden the lab lunged at me - tore my pants - dogs were off leash as it was an area with many hectares where dogs were allowed to run off leash
- my boxer at 35lbs who was about 40 yards away came running back attacked that dog and put her down within seconds - the couple screaming/yelling - get your dog off, she's going to kill her etc..... i called my dog off - surprising she let go - and she stood in front of me - total protective mode - frothing at the mouth
what ever the breed will your dog protect u? as of today i know where my Jetta stands!
 

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Yes my boy Hoss will protect.
Hoss is 6 years old.
Several incidents over the years and he will protect.
In these situations Hoss never leaves my left side….typically if off leash dogs are the issue he will stay to my left…and at times will sit on my left foot.
In these situations we are a team but I have learned to listen to Hoss’s advise.
Not sure why humans feel this need to pet my dog.
I do not pressure them to mess with their human children.
They ask…is your dog friendly and I respond …On most days he’s friendly….they respond…..Oh…OK…and they move on down the road.
Move it along pal….we got enough friends.
 

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The rapid test is highly unreliable. My brother's girlfriend took 4 of them recently, 2 negative and 2 positive. So no huge help there. I think it's a waste of time.
It's really only useful if one is showing symptoms. No symptoms, then it's a toss-up.

Ripley will ABSOLUTELY square up with a problem. I don't know that she'd know what to do about it if the problem continued to approach after she does the barky/growly/hackles up display, because I've never really needed to know. Thankfully.
 

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My Australian Shepherd proved herself in a weird situation where a man and his son were approaching us strangely, almost like they wanted to steal our other dog. I had to quick grab her collar so she didn’t attack them, and they left quickly. She also decided to go into protective mode when a hoard of around twenty boys from the local track team ran down our street when we were walking, screaming and acting like, well…boys. She didn’t like that, I think maybe because it was so many people running at her at once. She was only thirty pounds, but even when they put her to sleep they had to sneak up behind her and inject her with a sedative because she wasn’t letting anyone near her or me.
My shepherd puppy so far hasn’t really shown any protection too much. She seems to just bluff when she’s scared, but if the person she was scared of comes closer she cowers and pees. So at the moment I don’t think she would step up, but she’s only eight months so it may come in time. Her mom has just started showing protective instincts at age 3. She does raise all her hackles and bark at off leash dogs that try to attack us, but I think that’s more a fear thing? She’s been terrified of dogs ever since I couldn’t keep one dog away from her (thankfully he wasn’t aggressive) and he jammed his nose practically up her butt as a puppy. We don’t know any nice not super pushy dogs, so haven’t been able to expose her to good situations with them.
 

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Leo, Lily, and Simon
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I'm sure my dogs (GSD, APBT, and SPoo) would all put on a good show (the SPoo puppy certainly does), but actually protect ME? Eh... I'm pretty sure that if push came to shove, then they would go after someone, but protecting me would be a side effect of them protecting themselves.
 

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I've had demonstrations of behaviors that have me believe that virtually all of my Dobes would at least try to protect me--my Aussie--no way--his job was herding not protecting. The Afghan Hound was also very protective of me and the rest of the family--not very friendly to the rest of the world.

All of the Dobes who went through the WAE (a bunch of them predated the WAE) passed--but Joey, the loaner was the youngest to pass (last fall when he was only 20 months old--they can't even take the WAE until they are 18 months).

dobebug
 

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My daughter used to take 'Duggan' her first Doberman hiking, quite often, in the Wasatch range. Many times Duggan would spot wild life and take off after, but always coming back to her. One such time MB was left alone when she saw a lone hiker coming toward her on the same path. Not really dressed like a hiker, but in dark clothes, Hat pulled down so you couldn't view his face and she did feel a bit uneasy and wished Duggan was with her. About that time she spotted Dugg running down the slope toward the other hiker walking toward MB. Dugg made a beeline for him and then just circled him several times as the man froze in his steps. Then Duggan ran toward MB and positioned himself sitting in front of MB until the man obviously got enough nerve to pass.

I am sure when Duggan ran off that it wasn't far enough that she was always in his sights even thought she couldn't see him.
That was her first experience of the Dobremans protective instincts. And as I think of it, Dugg was just two yrs. at the time.
 

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RE: Dobermans and their innate protection tendencies

This is a copy and paste from a comment I posted in 2016 when McCoy was a bit over 1 1/2 years old. The thread was titled: McCoy The Guard Dog:

Unless a dog is trained defense/protection, one never knows how the dog will react in in a real life scenario until it happens. Well it happened in our household last night.


It was 3 AM, when McCoy, who sleeps open crated upstairs, came rushing down the stairs in full on alert. Barking, growling racing back and forth. I called him into our bedroom and he came to me. I didn't hear a thing, but he was still growling so I released him and he ran straight back to the living room and resumed his frantic barking and growling. So I grabbed a shotgun and followed him as he ran to our front balcony door still barking.

Sure enough we had an intruder trying to break in. He claimed someone was trying to kill him. I told him that if he didn't back down, I'd kill him. I opened the inner door and briefly turned on the light so he could see that I had 12 gauge pointed at him. one foot from his chest. The whole time, McCoy is standing by my side growing.

I told the guy to get on the ground, which surprisingly he did. I sent McCoy back to my wife and he sat by her side the whole time she was on 911. I held the intruder at gun point until the police came and arrested him. McCoy then went straight back up to his crate and slept through the rest of the night.

Happy ending. (Nobody died)


Good boy McCoy... you just passed the litmus test!

John L.
Portland OR
 

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I have to say this post has triggered in me a bad reaction. And though I want to believe the guy, this reaction lets me know that he had very bad intentions.
What happened is, one night very late, I heard the gate, on the dog yard gate, clang lightly. That meant someone opened it, and so was on the way to our door. My husband also had motion lights that covered our whole yard, in increments, and the middle yard was lit up. Our yards were long and narrow, as we lived on Lake Huron. So someone had to either come through the street front yard or the lakefront yard.
It took me just a second to jump out of bed. In only that same time, our Big goofy loves every body, English Bulldog Iz, was frantically tearing out of our bedroom, around the corner, under the stairway, and into the foyer, slamming out of his dog door. He actually put deep grooves in the hardwood floor under the stairs, getting purchase to make the tight turn. The person was still just inside the gate and managed to get back out of the gate and slam it shut. Iz was slamming against it, as I could hear him.
Meanwhile, I was on the phone to 911. Iz came slamming back inside, our house living area was all one big great room, so Iz was slamming and head butting the kitchen cabinets along the wall that the guy was slowly walking along. I could hear him as there is deep pea gravel along that side of the house. And we saw him pass the kitchen window. During this I am screaming at the guy.
Now the guy is at our patio doors, in the yard that faces the lake, and Iz is backing up and head slamming the doors, and so is my little 5lb poodle, Ziggy. Both dogs are snarling and growling. At this point I felt I was going to have to fight to protect us, so I set the phone down and got a bat. I also told the guy I had a gun....I did not, as my husband wasn't a fan of them. But now he is and now I do! The guy is just quietly standing there, after trying the door. Locked and bolted French patio doors, so not going to open without busting the glass. You can hear police sirens at this point.
The guy says he has the wrong house, and goes toward the lake. The police get there, and they go after him. They get him. But he was a guest of the neighbors, and said he had just made a mistake and was at the wrong house. They didn't believe him, but there was little they could do. The neighbors vouched that he was their guest. The police told him that he should plan to leave in the morning and not to be back in our area. He was from a different part of the country and agreed he would leave. The neighbors apologized and said he wouldn't be back. The police stayed in my driveway ALL night and escorted him to the airport.
I should point out, I was home alone as my husband is a long haul truck driver. But when he got home, he called the neighbors to a meeting and explained that not only should they never have that guy back, that if they wanted their house to be there long term, they should give him a list of people and addresses, of future guests. They were "week-end summer" people and decided that would be a good idea. My husband also called the guy "who had the wrong house" and calmly explained how upset he was? I could't hear the conversation.
I should also point out, I am an old lady, I was in my 50's then. I know the guy saw me working in my garden, and knew I was alone. But if robbery was his intent, he was a wealthy individual and there are empty summer houses always, in our neighborhood. We lived full time in our house. So why pick our house? And our middle yard had a big chicken coop and chickens in in. None of our yard areas looked anything like the neighbors?
Anyway, I so badly wanted to believe him. That it was just an error, and he was a nice guy. But right this second I am feeling very shaky and upset, so my gut says, Iz saved my life. !st and only time he was ever upset or showed any aggression. The poodle...is super people and dog friendly but will ( Ziggy is still with us, Iz has passed) bark at strange sounds.
Sorry so long.
 

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My old gal was quite protective of me on several occasions.

Once a weirdo came to the door pretending to be from the gas company. I had Coco at the door lightly holding her collar. This guy became aggressive and tried to push his way past me in the open door. Coco lunged at him barking, snarling and growling. I was amazed he would try such a thing with a big 100lb oversized byb female. He took off quick after that.

One night we were walking late at night. A jogger was coming up behind us. I heard him and should have moved but Coco was quite young and I didn't realize then that she was hyper vigilant at night. As the jogger got closer, Coco turned around and stood in front of me and barked and snarled. I was actually kind of embarrassed and was going to apologize but instead the jogger profusely apologized and stated "what was I thinking running up behind a woman with a Doberman. I am so sorry!!"

My last story is another night story. We used to go to the soccer fields at night for her to run. She was amazing offleash! Some teenage boys were in this patch of trees smoking pot. As I was walking by they jumped out at me to scare me. They didn't see Coco because it was so dark out. The black rocket came across that field and did an amazing bark and hold with one of the boys against the tree. The other ones started running away while the one by the tree started to cry. I called her off but then she started to chase the ones running! I yelled for all of them to stop.

Eventually the 3 little buggers were together and scared. Crying and apologizing while she circled them and I gave them a lecture that you never jump out at a woman alone especially at night!
 

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How about folks being dissuaded by the mere presence of your Doberman? Another story:

So, Butcher was the kind of dog who never growled and rarely barked. He was quite big, and kind of just "There". And for some reason, his simple posturing was very unnerving to both strangers and other dogs.

One afternoon, I was at my son's place. We were inside and Butcher was sunning on the front porch/deck. He was untethered, as it would never occur to him to leave without one of us. We heard some people out front talking about coming up to his house. I asked my son if we should bring the dog in. He said "No... He'll be fine.Plus, I don't want to talk some solicitor anyway. Next, we hear a person walking up the steps. They stop and turn around and go back down. I get up to see what's going on and there are a bunch of very nicely dressed folks with literature in their hand. Probably Jehovah's Witnesses or something. A woman says to a great big guy "Why didn't you go to the door?"
He say's "They've got a dog". She comes back with "So what?" He says " It's a big dog". She asks "What did he do?" The guy goes "Do? He got up and looked at me. Nope, I'm not going to that house.You want to go to that house? Be my guest."

John L.
Portland OR
 

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How about folks being dissuaded by the mere presence of your Doberman?
I don't know about others, but since my dogs are loved family members, I don't want them doing active protection as in throwing themselves at a bad guy. They are my "hostages to fortune," and I believe anyone who comes at me when they can see my dogs or breaks into my house would be prepared to deal with them, probably with a weapon.

So what I ask of my dogs is first, to be a deterrent, and I know they are. Starting many years ago when I was a young woman and less cautious than I am today, I know that particularly the Akita I had when I left home compensated just by her presence for a lot of the potentially dangerous situations I naively got myself into.

Later I know the Rotties did the same. I particularly remember one evening walking down a Denver sidewalk with my first Rottie. A young guy was coming toward us with a look that made me nervous, baggy pants, all that. I was considering crossing the street and other evasive moves, when HE crossed the street. She was BYB, small and fined boned, but she was a Rottweiler. The memory always makes me smile.

So that's what I want first and foremost, a deterrent. After that I want an early warning system, and dogs who can hear so much better than I can are that. I figure after the dogs let me know there's a problem, it's up to me to decide whether to flee with them or call 911 and count on Make My Day and Self-Defense laws here.
 

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RE: Dobermans and their innate protection tendencies

This is a copy and paste from a comment I posted in 2016 when McCoy was a bit over 1 1/2 years old. The thread was titled: McCoy The Guard Dog:

Unless a dog is trained defense/protection, one never knows how the dog will react in in a real life scenario until it happens. Well it happened in our household last night.


It was 3 AM, when McCoy, who sleeps open crated upstairs, came rushing down the stairs in full on alert. Barking, growling racing back and forth. I called him into our bedroom and he came to me. I didn't hear a thing, but he was still growling so I released him and he ran straight back to the living room and resumed his frantic barking and growling. So I grabbed a shotgun and followed him as he ran to our front balcony door still barking.

Sure enough we had an intruder trying to break in. He claimed someone was trying to kill him. I told him that if he didn't back down, I'd kill him. I opened the inner door and briefly turned on the light so he could see that I had 12 gauge pointed at him. one foot from his chest. The whole time, McCoy is standing by my side growing.

I told the guy to get on the ground, which surprisingly he did. I sent McCoy back to my wife and he sat by her side the whole time she was on 911. I held the intruder at gun point until the police came and arrested him. McCoy then went straight back up to his crate and slept through the rest of the night.

Happy ending. (Nobody died)


Good boy McCoy... you just passed the litmus test!

John L.
Portland OR
Good boy!! This!! This is what I want!! NEED!!
 

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These stories are good to hear! Since I’ve decided to get a Doberman I have been back and forth on whether or not to train them in protection. It sounds like, for the most part, the protection instinct of the Doberman is enough.
But I would like to know everyone’s opinion and or pros and cons of protection training.

Thanks!
 

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As if just being a Doberman owner for a lot of years and have spent an unholy length of time hunting for places that will rent to me and my dog(s) the downside of having any dog that is protection trained far outweighs the pro side in my opinion.

You eliminate a lot of places that won't rent to--and if you are buying, a lot of HOA's wont allow protection trained dogs. A fair number of insurance company's won't provide home owners insurance if protection trained dogs are involved.

I've had Dobes pretty steadily since 1959 and have never needed anything more than the natural protection built into a well bred Doberman.

dobebug/ABTLH
 

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I've had Dobes pretty steadily since 1959 and have never needed anything more than the natural protection built into a well bred Doberman.

Thx Bug, that says it perfect.
This is the only breed of dog bred for the purpose of protecting man. If bred correctly you don't really need to help that or teach that. It's built in.

dobebug/ABTLH
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