Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Hemi :)
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hemi's almost 3 months now, and when we go for walks hes all over the place, but i understand he doesnt have much focus since hes still a baby, i usually take him late at night so theres not many distractions for him like screaming kids, cars and all that jazz...

just wondering at what age did everyones dobies start walking normally lol and i find if we run together its alot better hes more focused and hey the more exercise for me and him the better :)

Thanks all
 

·
u mad?
Joined
·
6,476 Posts
I hope you're not running much with him. Forced exercise (so running next to you on a leash, especially on a road) should not be done before 18 months.

As for becoming "normal" on walks... The more you walk him and the more he gets used to he the more he'll start to settle down. When I walk my boy a lot it gets easier with each walk but when the area is new to him he's usually all over. As for attention... He's pretty good at it now (18 months) but when he was a puppy I had a horrible time with him. We worked on attention games for a few weeks and that helped but not so much in areas with lots of distractions.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
mine had to be trained to not pull
most dogs do...
 
  • Like
Reactions: Adara

·
Hemi :)
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nope i wouldnt force him to run, id rather walk quick pace but once in a while ill jog a little n then walk and then take a break so he can have some water or some down time to relax a little bit :)

walking on roads r a no go for me i keep him on the sidewalk or on the grass

and thanks im hoping for cooler weather for more walks get him used to the routine
 

·
Doberman
Joined
·
43 Posts
try using a lead. I used one with my pup and of course he hated it, but he was PERFECT on walks. You can also try a harness. that seems to also help.


Training and time is key. Rome wasn't built in a day. :) just keep it up and he will follow suit.
 

·
Collar Connoisseur
Joined
·
908 Posts
Mine is 10 months and he will only walk normal if he's tired but for the first half hour or so OMG he is horrible so we stop a lot. He's also been to a couple of matches so he has been pretty good about ignoring all the other dogs around.
Yours is only 3 months and just a baby, give it time and some puppy classes will help :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
how many dogs have you had before...???
cause even when that problem gets solved sometimes new ones sprout up
 
  • Like
Reactions: Adara

·
joie de vivre
Joined
·
11,276 Posts
I'd recommend puppy class to help you learn how to train loose-leash walking. Also, don't expect a quick solution. It can take a long time for some pups/dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,544 Posts
More training and less walking is what you need to focus on now.
Teach to walk with a slack leash. Leash training is A LOT of work and can take a LONG time of going NO WHERE.
Lots of treats and teaching the dog to pay attention to YOU.
Which can mean a lot of walking in circles until the dog starts paying attention to where YOU are going and not whats in front of his nose.

I taught my pup, everytime I stop we don't move until you sit. He is good on the leash now (at a year and a half) but still gets carried away with a smell or a bird. If I can tell he is losing his focus I stop, and we dont move until he sits and looks back at me.

Do NOT expect a quick fix, depending on your dog and your patience leash training can take a long time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
I'd recommend puppy class to help you learn how to train loose-leash walking. Also, don't expect a quick solution. It can take a long time for some pups/dogs.
Puppy class was very important for us. Not only does it give the human the foundation for training correct behavior, but we found it invaluable for socialization. Many puppy classes split their time between teaching the owner and just letting the puppies interact (supervised, of course).

I will share some things I learned, but, as with most things, there is no one right answer.

There are good games you can play at home and bring with you on your walks like touch and attention games. A good "touch" game is to mark and reward every time your pup touches their nose to your open palm. Start slow with your hand open in front of their nose. When they go to sniff and touch their nose, immediately use a marker word, such as "YES!" or "GOOD!" and give a small treat. Slowly introduce a command such as "Touch!" and open your hand further away from their nose. The pup should follow to your hand touch it and look to you for a treat. This can be a huge help, later down the line, if you want to teach him how to go back to heel position, "call to front" where the pup moves from heel to sit in front of you, or just making turns easier while you walk. In practical use, once your pup has mastered this, if he's walking ahead of you and starts to put tension on the leash, you can stop, say "Touch!" and he should look back to you, looking for your hand (which can be strategically placed by your side), then come back to your for the touch and reward.
An attention game we learned in puppy class was to put your dog in a sit and present a treat slightly out of reach. Do your best to keep them sitting in place (they'll be looking at the treat at this point), and just hold the treat. The second they break their gaze at the treat and look at you, mark and reward. Later, add in a command word like "Me!" Over time, they will know that if they look at you, then get the reward. This can be helpful down the road when teaching "leave it" because, if they are going after something they shouldn't, you can get their focus back to you. In practice, on your walks, you can use your command "Me!" with them by your side and they will want to make eye contact with you for the reward. Do this in baby steps... get their attention on you before you start your walk and reward. Get his attention again, walk a few steps and reward (if he's still focused on you). Over time, they'll make the connection that walking with you and watching you is what gets them their reward.
Granted, there are times when this just will not work (squirrel or really smelly piece of whatever on the ground), but repetition and reinforcing the proper behavior is the key. And, don't get too worked up if it doesn't work every time. At 3 months, your boy is super young. He's got lots of time. Enjoy puppy hood!! Outside of the sleepless nights, upset baby bellies, putting everything in their mouth, etc., etc., it's an amazing time!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,449 Posts
With puppies I often use a no pull type of harness for when I want to enjoy a walk, not be pulled down the street like a freight train and not have to worry about training. The harness does NOT train the dog to walk nice. It's a tool I use so we can enjoy some walks. You still need to take the time to train the loose leash walking, but it's a nice compromise before they are trained.
 
  • Like
Reactions: brw1982

·
Super Moderator
Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
Joined
·
26,450 Posts
This is a somewhat silly answer from a mom who just had a looong involved "discussion" with the older boy---They NEVER get any easier; the problems just change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
I agree, they never get easier! You just learn to cope better!
This is upsetting news... people keep telling me about this magic and wonderful 18-24 months "threshold" where they suddenly become the most perfect dog in the world and all the badness vanishes into thin air!! I've been counting the days!! ;-)
 

·
Super Moderator
Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
Joined
·
26,450 Posts
They are clearly victims of a form of RSI (Repetitive Stress Injury--carpal tunnel is another kind of RSI), in which repeated stresses can lead to numbness.
 

·
Hemi :)
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
thanks guys alot of great advice :) and yes we plan to put him in puppy classes soon, im open to getting to know the breed better and just pups in general.... this is our first dog as a couple so we r brand new parents...its scary to think im doing something wrong but i try my best and is will to do anything to make my little man happy and safe
 

·
Get the bunnies!
Joined
·
7,024 Posts
With puppies I often use a no pull type of harness for when I want to enjoy a walk, not be pulled down the street like a freight train and not have to worry about training. The harness does NOT train the dog to walk nice. It's a tool I use so we can enjoy some walks. You still need to take the time to train the loose leash walking, but it's a nice compromise before they are trained.
This is what I did for Elsie. When I had time/patience to train I would, but if I just needed to get her out for a walk quickly before I had to go to class i would pop her harness on - that way she is getting exercised but we weren't undoing all of our training.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top