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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, Having some trouble training Tazz.. (he hasnt had much outdoor training)
He's perfect in house, but outside gets distracted by everything, & pretty much wants to do his own thing..
He just seems to 'switch off' & doesnt use his ears at all..
A local trainer i went to gave a very rough, 'break his neck with a good yank'
approach.. which i didnt like at all, & neither did Tazz, but being as submissive as he is, he does take heed to it & do what u tell him.
(with a very sad face) however, there is no way i could keep doing that to him, Esp in public, its not gonna happen.
My OH's trainer, when she had her GSD aparently had this same approach.
So basicly im just wondering what methods you guys use, or find work well,
remembering he isnt 'mad' outside, just he doesnt listen very well..
Would be good to compare & get ideas anyway, Im at abit of a loss really..
Thanks for any replys :)
Tazz & Phil.
 

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IMO, a traiing (choke) collar is not to be used in a "break his neck with a good yank" manner. It is more of an attention getter than a "choker".


Maybe you can try using a clicker or whistle.
 

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My trainer showed Dobes, and she never used rough tactics on Java. A prong collar works wonders - it gets her attention, and I only have to use a correction once (and I don't need to use a 'break her neck yank' to get her attention, either). As soon as she obeys she gets an enthusiastic 'Good girl!' (you can't overdo the praise).

Dobes are single-minded and will do what they want to do unless we train them otherwise. A lot has to do with the age of the dog, and the consistency of training. Going to a class once a week and not practicing between classes doesn't do a whole lot of good. A correction and lots of praise (and a treat) when he does what is asked of him will build his confidence and make him want to please you.

I am constantly surprised at how sensitive Dobes are to our reactions to them. Training should be fun for both of you.

You should ask Kratty how he trains Nikita - she has to be one of the most well-trained dogs I have seen.
 

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Phil i would try to find a training class where they use far less abrupt training methods!what you will find is if you train him up inside over the winter and gradually take the training exercise outside you will find him take to the commands on the grass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was thinking of a 'prong collar' - however i was alittle put off with the thought that, i want him to learn to heel with & without the collar.. Not just when he feels the collar go on.. Also i cant see it being very comfortable, If i put his choke chain upto his jaw (where u place the prong) he really doesnt like it, (although he mite get use to it if i had it there all the time)
Also - Main problem with him really, Is off lead work. He is ok for about a minute, (probably cause he doesnt realise the lead is off, as i calm him right down first etc) But then he just trotts off, & completely ignores me. & thats when we are alone, If theres other ppl & dogs about hes gone! lol
A. he is a doberman, many people would be scared of him running upto them or their dogs,
B. i have recently had a second knee operation, & cant run, so if it gets serious im abit helpless..
Which ends up being he gets pretty short bursts off the lead, to run, & then is back on everytime i see a dog or anything that may distract him.
Any good ideas for this? + i will be trying to find a 'positive reinforcement' training class for him shortly. but otherwise any ideas?
Thanks :)
- whats your opinions on E-collars? crossed my mind as the theory seems logical for distance corrections.. & aparently it doesnt hurt the dog on normal levels, (which is all Tazz would need) he is rather soft, lol Cheers :)
 

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I don't think he is ready to come off lead. You can train with a long training lead (20-30ft). This way he feels like he is off lead but you still have total control. I would work on basic commands outside and especially recall, use a really good treat and lot's of praise. Do this everyday maybe 4 to 5 times from different distances. When he get's good at that, start adding distractions. I think you could do this all on a flat collar. And don't fret it, recall is a command that takes lot's of work to get to the point where he will come back everytime...keep him on lead!!:)
 

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Training outside vs training inside is two separate things. Even when you start out training inside, you have to train in every room of the house. Just because you can get poochy to sit in the kitchen, does not mean you can get them to sit in the bedroom. I'm not sure how much training you have done so far, but once you have completed the basics, you have to start adding distance and distractions to the routine.

For example, in basic class, you get poochy to sit. You are standing directly infront of them and they sit on command. What happens when you walk 6 feet away from them, doesn't matter what directions. They probably will walk over to you and sit directly infront of you. So working on adding distances to the basic commands will lead towards off leash control. Having poochy sit when you are 10 feet behind them and they are facing another direction is a goal. After you have the distances working nicely, you have to add distractions. You want poochy to think you are better than anything else around them. Other people watching, dogs walking by, sounds of children playing next door, those pesty squirrels gathering Brums for the winter. You want to be able to keep their focus or atleast being aware of your presence at all times. We train everywhere and anywhere. Any part of the house, inside or outside. I like training in town. I have put on a show more than a few times in front of Starbucks.

Also like it was mentioned, when working towards off leash, start with a longer lead. The 30 to 50 ft leads work well and of course in a safe environment. We have done a lot of training with my girl dragging that lead around the woods and in the training field. But if anything is better than me, I can stop her by just stepping on the lead to stop her. We went from training on a 6 foot lead, to a 30 foot lead to being able to have her in off leash situations with control. Of course I would alwayd be aware of your surrounding to make sure thing are safe for poochy
 

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Never take off the lead until all commands are down pat, I used a 30ft.nylon parachute type cord when training my Bouvier for his CD we would go to the tennis court shut all the gates then he would still be dragging the cord.Of course no one was playing tennis at the time just a good place to practice out side keeping the dog safe.I would think when you take off the lead too early every time he does not follow a command it is reinforcing the idea he does not have to mind you I would keep the lead on for a long,long time till he is doing everything with distractions around.
Has been a long time since I trained but starting a class 10/30/06 can you go to a class lots of distractions there.As for a pinch think of it this way would you rather be pinched or choked I myself would rather get a pinch,Choke chains in the wrong hands can cause tracheal damage where as Pinch collar the dog corrects itself you do not have to jerk it at all,I would never turn my dog over to another person to train the dog could not trust you again.
Patches Mom
 

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I use gentle leaders or the Haltie and the new Promise harness that is out, for walking before they are heeling well. I don't like prong or cholk collars at all. The trainer that I used to work with on a regular basis didn't use them either. The new Promise harness puts pressure across the dogs chest when they pull forward. The leash connects to the front of the chest instead of the middle of the back as it would with a regualr harness. I just leant an old one to a friend with a big unruly lab puppy who was dragging her across town. She said it worked like a charm and that it was very easy to walk both her dobie mix and lab together.

Both my dogs did very well with clicker training. I only use it to teach new behaviors. They are attentive and egar to learn. I started working with them at 8 weeks pretty much from day 1 in my home, for very short periods of course.

HTH,

Leslie
 
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