Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a nine month old boy, named Beau, who goes immediately into flight mode when he feels something isn't right - and it's over random situations; anything from walking past an aisle in a pet store, an animal he's never seen before (oh lord, you should have seen him the first time he saw a horse), or walking past someone's yard.

Part of my problem I'm encountering is typical dog collars do not work well with Dobermans, especially one pulling back out of fear. I can't seem to find one that works well for him (I was even eyeballing chokes and Greyhound collars), mostly one that won't slip over his ears if he decides to plant all four feet and pull backwards on his leash.

Does anyone have any tips on good collars to use that will aid me in keeping my dog attached on the other end, as well as any tips on getting him to calm down enough to walk past areas that scare him? He absolutely refuses to walk past them, and I wind up having to pick him up and carry him..which is not an easy task to do since he ways upwards of 60lbs.

Thanks!
 

·
joie de vivre
Joined
·
11,315 Posts
I would recommend a martingale to prevent him from slipping out.

Apart from picking him up and carrying him at times, how do you react to his "flight mode"? Also, I definitely would stop that. No picking him up and carrying him. He needs to learn to remain calm and that can't be helping him in the situation.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bean and LuvMyDobes

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I generally don't try and support babying him like that, but unfortunately the last few times he did this I wasn't in a position to be able to wait it out and work him through it. Picking him up and going past the spot was my only option.

What I've been doing is trying to get his attention back on me when he starts to panic, being assertive enough to get his attention focused back, but not enough so where he thinks he's in trouble (he'll run from people if he thinks he did something wrong or if you yell at him). I'll walk back towards him to get him to stop pulling and let him get his wits back, trying not to praise him since I don't want him to think he's being praised for being uncooperative. I'll walk over to the spot he was afraid of and beckon him over trying to show him nothing's wrong, but he'll just stare at me and plant all four feet. I have yet to actually get him to come over to the spot, even by praising him or forcing him over to the area.

He's a rescue with quite a sad history to him, and I think part of his flight mentality was from his abuse as a puppy and living on the streets. I can't pinpoint what exactly scares him, but some things just make him very unhappy, and because of his lack of willingness to want to cooperate once he settles down, leaves me in a rather weird spot since I've never had to deal with this sort of fear/behaviour before.

Another edit: In addition to my other comment.. If another member of my household gets angry with him, his immediate reaction is to run to momma (me) and stay as close to me as he can. So normally when he feels afraid he knows I'm there, which is where I'm a little stumped in the situation of him not even seeking me for comfort in public places when he gets frightened.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,030 Posts
Just curious how long have you had him ? I also recommend a martingale collar. If you have not had him long maybe you need to go slower on new things let him just sit and stare at the new object he should eventually get over his fear on his own by being curious most pups are. Have you looked up Puppy Fear Periods you can Google it that might help. What kind of bond do you have with this pup takes a while for a rescue to bond with some one new.Obedience classes where you go with the pup might in crease your bond.Good Luck with the Pup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Beau is currently nine months old and I've had him since he was five months (so I've owned him for four months). He sustained a really bad leg injury as a puppy and his foster owner had kept him a little sheltered during her time with him, which I feel may be why he's afraid of some newer sights and smells.

Beau is very much a momma's boy and generally doesn't stray far from me and is very much a people-pleaser, which is again why I'm unsure why he acts like he does when he's scared in public. This has been more of a recent issue in the last month than any other time I've had him, his worst breakout being this afternoon.

I can definitely try and take things slower with him, perhaps only plan outings with him where I know I can take the time to work with him if he gets upset.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Coincidently, I work at a feed store, so I'll pick up a martingale collar next time I'm working. I'll give that a try, and perhaps take my own advice there of not taking him out unless I can commit the time to working with him if he panics. :)

I appreciate the input from everyone. I'm definitely open to other suggestions as well if anyone cares to toss anything in!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
Find a person who has an older, well-trained, very calm dog, to follow on your walks. Your pup will see how the other dog reacts and will learn alot from them. As your pup gains confidence and experience, you can weed out following another dog, and can go out alone. I did this with my rescued rottie, it really does work. As for collars, a martingale would probably work.
 

·
APS SGT
Joined
·
1,427 Posts
If you think your dog will panic when he is no longer able to slip the collar you might think about the greyhound collar. It will disperse the pressure on his neck if he starts spinning. A martingale is perfect otherwise. Also, the older dog idea works well for me with young or insecure dogs I've fostered.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mlsandg

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,449 Posts
A martingale collar or a greyhound martingale type would also. I rarely use flat collars, leather collars etc on Dobe puppies because they are so easy for them to back out of. I've mostly used a soft slip collar until they are trained and then a conventional training slip collar. Once trained I do use flat collars on them.

Your rescue puppy sounds both very soft and very reactive. The book recommended for training reactive dogs should help a lot and would give you more insight into the mechanics of reaction behavior in dogs.

One of the things you might try when he has these fllip out moments is to stop--don't try to take him back to where he reacted but when he has calmed down a bit take either a right turn or left turn or even go straight ahead--just to getting him moving again so that he is getting minimal attention from you in response to his flip out.

Just be aware that the attention (even if it's not in the form of conforting and being too solicitous) is still attention so the less attention that is paid to his freak outs the better off he'll eventually be.

The biggest thing for developing some control over and helping a soft reactive dog learn to control his own fears is to move him along away from the thing or place he was reacting to.

Don't carry him anywhere--that's a huge mistake.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top