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Neo Puppy, Lanah Chi-Cairn X 6 y/o, RIP Eva HADR Rescue Dobe, Sunking's Spock, Lillah Chi-Terrier X
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Thanks for the pictures of your girl, Nova!

You might want to take a look at this Hypothyroidism thread from 2017 where I discussed our Eva's treatment.

This was years before her cardiac problems and caused her to go from around 65 lbs. when we adopted her at age 2, to a pinnacle of 101 lbs. over a five year period!
It caused her to not enjoy longer walks and to "turn to stone" on walks since she was carrying so much extra weight.
Her weight gain crept up on us over this period, then one day at vet's waiting area, another dog owner asked me if Eva was a Rottweiler? Yikes!
After being hypothyroid treatment for a few months she got back down to a reasonable weight and was back to her feisty self, which lasted until her last days.
 
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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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She's a touch overweight, but not massively so.

Does she stand with the posture she's using in the pic in post #23 a lot--with her rear legs spread apart? That can be a sign of back trouble. My Kip had back trouble the last couple of years of his life. It slowed him down a bit, and he took on a characteristic way of standing with his hind legs splayed out. But he also hunched his rump down a bit too, which I'm not seeing your girl do in your pictures.

 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Hi Melbord, her back does not slope down like yours doberman's does. Her legs are never like that either, i stood her up real quick to take a pic, the rear legs are always close to eachother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Hi guys, happy labor day weekend. Nova's nails were bleeding again the other day after a short walk, same foot. I got my GF to walk her while I carefully watched her feet and noticed she does drag the front ones a little and they are a little turned in-ward :( So for the hell of I placed socks on her two front paws and went for a walk. No more noise, no more clacking and dragging noise, so it is def her front feet. I am wondering if she stop sna dlays down during walk because she is in pain or possible discomfort? Do they make orthotic's for dogs? What do I do??
 

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I'd really be seeking out vet care, personally. I know you said you saw a vet a while ago, but maybe she needs to see someone else, or a specialist?
 
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I agree but where the hell do I go? I dont know any specialists on Long Island. Maybe we have some long Islanders on this forum that can help me out.
 

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I'd really be seeking out vet care, personally. I know you said you saw a vet a while ago, but maybe she needs to see someone else, or a specialist?
Me too--foot dragging especially if it's to the point of causing nail bleeding is often another sign of back (or more specifically spinal problems--which may start up at the neck.

I'd want her seen by an orthopedist if she were my dog.

dobebug
 

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If you have a vet school anywhere around, you can contact them--sometimes they have clinics associated with them; they may also be able to give you some referrals.

And once you have a specialist diagnosis the problem, your ordinary local vet can sometimes carry on with any treatments that may be needed with consults with the specialist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Hi guys, got bloodwork done last week at the vet. Nova's thyroid levels are so low they ran the test twice to verify. They are going to call me back on what to put her on. Any recommendations is appreciated.
 

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Have they run a full thyroid panel? It would require them to send the blood to a lab that does the full panels (not just do them "in-house"), but you really need all of the tests run to get a complete idea what is going on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I will ask them. She has been on a raw diet for a year now as well. I am wondering if I gave her to much raw poultry that contained trachia and gullets? I know they sent the blood out, they dont do in-house.
 

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I wouldn't think that what you are feeding (if the question is about too much raw poultry which contained trachia and gullets) would cause a reading of low thyroid levels--hypothyroidism in Dobermans is very common. I hope they sent the bloodwork out to Michigan State--they are pretty much the gold standard for full thyroid testing. And low but within normal range (on the most common thyroid test--T4) is often not good enough and Dobes often need to be supplemented with a thyroid supplement. That's why you really need to have the full thyroid test to figure out how much supplement the dog needs. Common practice is to start supplementing and recheck thyroid level after about 6 weeks on the the supplement (and the recheck is generally only for a T4) and adjust the meds as necessary.

And I wouldn't think feeding raw would have anything to do with the foot dragging. That still sounds like some sort of a spinal problem but I'm not a vet so for what that's worth.

Good luck--keep us posted on the outcome of the testing.

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Thanks, you said supplement and then med's. Is it a prescription med or is a supplement?? The paw dragging is another issue we are working on and realized it has to do with her injury she sustained last year.
 

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Feeding a lot of beef trachea (gullet) can have the effect of raising their thyroid levels, not lowering it I would assume that chicken would have a similar effect? .
 

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Here you go--a source (though not necessarily an official one), Rosemary:

"The main risk of beef gullets (along with duck necks and turkey necks) is feeding a dog these animals parts risks exposing them to active thyroid secreting hormones, which can lead to hyperthyroidism."

And an FDA report:
FDA warns of thyroid risk from dog food containing gullets (consumeraffairs.com)

I would think chickens are enough like turkey the same would apply. Apparently necks have the thyroid or parts of it still attached.
 

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Thanks, you said supplement and then med's. Is it a prescription med or is a supplement?? The paw dragging is another issue we are working on and realized it has to do with her injury she sustained last year.
It is a prescription "supplement"--supplement is used to describe what it's doing--supplementing the inadequate supply of thyroxine that the dog is producingl.

It's not something you can buy over the counter. Probably because it takes lab testing to determine if the dog doesn't have enough thyroxine produced by it's own body. And the lab testing is also instrumental in determining how much supplementation is appropriate.

And please note--as Melbrod and Rosemary have pointed out--the addition of thyroid glands attached to tracheas and necks--they would possibly cause Hyperthyroidism--an excess of thyroxin (as a side not cats, are prone to hyperthyroidism--dogs only rarely and usually caused by a too high dosage of thyoxine given to a hypothyroid (low thyroid) dog.
 
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