Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Hi guys (so sorry about the long post...)

I'm brand new to this forum, but have been creeping for a while :). I want to get a doberman puppy sometime in spring or summer of next year. I realize that's a while from now, but its important to me to be as informed as possible before I finally purchase my first doberman pup (I've had a boxer mix and german shepherd/husky mix already)! I started babysitting for a family friend who owns a doberman and just fell in love. I started researching and this breed honestly sounds like a perfect fit for me.

Once I move I will be living by myself, so I'd like some protection if ever need be. However I am an "outdoor junkie" for a lack of a better phrase, and spend a lot of time camping, hiking, trail running, mountain biking and rock climbing and would obviously want to bring my new pup along with me. Some of these activities will have other dogs and small children around, so I thought it would be wise to choose a breeder and socialize him/her young, instead of an older rescue who may be harder to socialize (please correct me if this thought process seems wrong, I'm more than happy to adopt a rescue :)).

My other thought about breeders vs rescues is that breeder pups seem to be more reliably healthy than rescues (again please correct this thought if you feel it is incorrect), and I obviously would not like to adopt a 1 year old rescue with cardiomyopathy or vonWillebrands that needs extensive medical care or might pass away and break my heart sooner than expected.

I will be honest and tell you I am working a 7am-4pm monday through friday job at this point, however there are several doggy daycares near me and am more than happy to spend the extra expense to make sure my pup is happy while I'm gone. I am also looking to spend some serious time training my pup and have already checked out classes available in the area.

So, my questions are: Will a Doberman be a good fit for me? If so, do I choose a breeder pup or rescue pup? And lastly, if I do choose a breeder, does anyone have any advice about breeders near Grand Junction, Colorado and/or how to tell if they are reliable (I'm willing to drive across several states if need be though)?

One last issue I've been facing too (And I swear I'm done typing): dog breed restrictions while renting. I've been told if I get my own renters insurance or get the pup AKC certified as a good citizen they aren't legally allowed to restrict the type of dog I bring into the house. The place I'm renting now doesn't appear to have an breed restrictions, but I know there is a big stigma against dobermans and am worried I may face some resistance. Does anyone have any experience with this?

Thank you all so much for your all your time and input!! Much appreciated :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
There are a lot of (unfortunately) fantastic dogs in rescue that end up there through no fault of their own. They are well behaved, well mannered and well socialized. My first Doberman was a rescue from a no kill shelter in New York, and she was absolutely perfect for my family. She had been bounced around through several homes for various reasons (aggressive with cats, barks too much, aggressive at the door, ect…) but for us, she was perfect. So please do not rule rescue out.

Raising a puppy is hard work. And being at work for 8 hours a day…. Puppies can not hold it in for that long. You’ll need a dog walker or something similar for the first year or so. Dobermans are large, energetic dogs. They need a mental and physical outlet for their energy!

The Doberman may or may not be a good fit for you; that depends on your level of commitment and willingness to sacrifice so that you can share your life with this amazing breed.

Breed discrimination is very real. Having a dog makes it harder to rent; having a Doberman makes it twice as hard.

Good on you for asking these questions and taking the time to think it through before making a decision.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
Welcome! A well trained Doberman sounds like it could be a good fit for you, but having a puppy in your current situation could be hard. While I've used doggy daycare in the past, many of them require a lot of vaccinations that I don't necessarily agree with giving young puppies, and they are very expensive to do every day, assuming you can find a good one that has space for you every day. In addition, most require you to spay/neuter by six months, which I also don't agree with. Finding an adult breeder re-home or a vetted rescue might be a better fit. An older dog would also be able to participate in all your outdoor activities right away, while a young puppy needs to have its exercise moderated until its growth plates are closed.

I don't know the rental laws where you live, but landlords in WA can pretty much deny whatever kind of dogs they want. I have a Great Dane and a Doberman, when I was renting it took me on average 9 months to find a new rental and pickings were usually pretty slim. I haven't had issues finding renters insurance, but I know it can be hard in some states. I do compete with my dogs in Barn Hunt and Nosework, and finding hotels to stay in is almost impossible at times.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,590 Posts
Good synopsis above and I'll add that although I don't know what laws Colorado has about so called "dangerous" breed dogs but I do know that Oregon (and several other states have laws in force that give a landlord the right to refuse to rent, if they choose, to anyone who has a dog that is on the states dangerous dog list. You should check tha part of it out.

Additionally I think that even if Colorado has a statewide law about landlords being obliged to rent without restriction if you provide your own renters insurance or if the dog has a CGC--I suspect that you would need to check this out place by place. A good many insurance companies will not insure (home owners and renters insurance) if there is a Dobeman owned by the applicant (some will given there is no bite history) and in my experience the CGC is usually tied to reduced charges for things like pet deposits.

Bottom line is that you need to check this stuff out place by place and in advance with a very specific rental contract.

And one final thought--some of the things that you talk about--hiking, rock climbing, trail running in particular are not something you would really be able to do with a puppy--some kinds of exercise shouldn't be part of the agenda for dogs until their growth plates close because of potential damage to the growth plates. That can be as late as 18 months to 2 years.

And finally--there are a number of camping areas where dogs are either not allowed at all or allowed only on leash--that's something else to look at--some of the federal laws are very restrictive.

Good luck though...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
When it comes to renting with a Doberman, landlords are allowed to deny your dog if it doesn't abide by their rules, with or without renter's insurance and a CGC. That being said, there are landlords that will seriously take this into consideration and might make an exception for someone who has taken the time to cover their bases and proves to be a responsible owner.

When I was renting, it took me a lot longer than normal to find an apartment and as long as you give yourself plenty of time to find something, you should be okay. And keep in mind that privately owned rental properties as opposed to ones with 20+ units, tend to be more flexible. (And ask for a first floor apartment only. Bouncy puppies overhead make neighbors grumpy)

I raised my Doberman in apartments and he's been absolutely perfect, but you have to put in the extra effort to keep him/her well exercised and occupied as you probably wont have a yard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,779 Posts
Hi and welcome to the forum, glad you're doing your homework.

"Once I move I will be living by myself, so I'd like some protection if ever need be." I would advise you not to think of your dog as protection. The last thing you want for your dog is to be put down because of biting someone or quarantined and ran through behavioral tests. If protection is what you are wanting I would advise seeking out my friends Smith & Wesson for that.

"However I am an "outdoor junkie" for a lack of a better phrase, and spend a lot of time camping, hiking, trail running, mountain biking and rock climbing and would obviously want to bring my new pup along with me." A Doberman pup can hike around a mile from 6mo-year. But no hard running or hiking until after 2. That's just how it is with bigger breeds.

A rescue may not be as healthy and it maybe healthier, chances are better when you purchase from a reputable breeder but there's never a guarantee. As far as socialization, I actually help a rescue, and most of the dogs that come to us are good with other dogs, children, not always cats. :)

Breed restrictions are what they are in Colorado and it's the reason I bought my house. Just curious will you be living in an apartment or a house? You will find most reputable breeders VERY hesitant about releasing a puppy to someone living in an apt. It's just not the right place for a dobe. Too many unseen noises, a lot of strangers around, dogs... it's a lot for them to deal with.

As far as breeders near you the only one I know of (well that's worth a dam) is Wisdom dobes., breeder is Kathi Wisdom. She maybe breeding this fall or maybe spring I'm not sure. Lydia Hovanski with Koral's dobes is in Utah but not too far.
If you want to look at Denver breeders there's Gallant, Imagemaker, Wiry Wiry, Imperia, and I'm sure I'm missing a few.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts
Second what lxi7311 said about renting--you can still be denied with your own renter's insurance and CGC. Part of the problem there is also that you would have to have the Doberman and they would have to allow it based on your word that the puppy could ultimately obtain a CGC. I would not recommend pursuing a Doberman until you have contacted your property management and asked specifically about Doberman, and find a new place if needed. Like GR, I purchased my house here. Previously I did live in an apartment, where I applied with a Doberman on the pets list to ensure that management knew.

Raising a dobe puppy in an apartment does take a lot of extra work, especially when they are around 8-18 months. You will need to commit to walks and training before work to prevent a destructo-dobe. Doberman are also not great doggie daycare dogs, so I wouldn't rely on that. Many daycares and boarding facilities will flat out refuse them, especially if they unaltered, which you should not alter until 18-24 months. So you would definitely need to arrange to come home or have someone else come let them out throughout the days that you work.

Good luck with your choice!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
...Some of these activities will have other dogs and small children around, so I thought it would be wise to choose a breeder and socialize him/her young, instead of an older rescue who may be harder to socialize (please correct me if this thought process seems wrong, I'm more than happy to adopt a rescue :)).
I didn't see this addressed, yet, and thought I would chime in. One of the benefits of a rescue or a breeder re-home is that you know what you are getting in terms of temperament, intensity, and personality. Of course, the great breeders can make a nice match for you with a puppy, but there is nothing as sure as interacting with and observing the fully grown dog. There are well socialized, dog-friendly, kid-friendly Dobermans looking for a second home. I would encourage you to include rescues and re-homes in your search since having a dog with these qualities is important to you.

Socialization has a specific critical window in puppyhood; you are correct about that. If socialization does not happen in puppyhood, it takes years of hard work to change a dogs reaction and comfort level, and even then, it will never be quite the same as what could have been done when a puppy. But that doesn't mean you need a puppy. It means you need either a puppy or a dog that was well-socialized as a puppy. And since there is the added individual dog's preference about activities, being around kids, and being around other dogs, there are advantages to finding an adult dog who you know likes these types of activities and environment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all so much for your responses! I had no idea I would get this many this quickly! I really appreciate it.

To respond to a few of the questions in the posts above, I am privately renting a house with a fenced backyard, and the landlord has stated they allow "large dogs" and haven't made any statements about breed restrictions (although I will be specifically asking about that in the upcoming months). Also, I am able to come home during my one hour lunch at 12-1 every day. But after reading these responses I think an older rescue or breeder re-home sounds like a much better choice for me. There are two Doberman rescues in Denver that I will start inquiring about. Do I just email/call breeders about he re-homing dobes? How do I go about that process?

Also, I wouldn't plan on taking a puppy out for that much activity of course, just wanted the post to express my activity level to make sure a Doberman would one day be able to match that :)

Thank you all again so much for all the feedback. I want to make sure I am making the best choice for me and my future dog!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
To find out about breeder rehomes you would definitely need to do a little bit of networking. You should go to the DPCA and UDC websites and search for local chapter clubs. Here's a link to the relevant UDC page:

UDC Member Clubs

The UDC has a chapter club in CO and the contact person for that club is great. She'll do as much as she can to steer you in the right direction. The DPCA also has some great people in CO.

It wouldn't hurt to attend local shows and events in person either. But contacting local people by email is a good first step.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
There is a group on Facebook, Doberman Pinscher Breeder Listings, that occasionally has breeder re-homes posted. It does cover a wide area though, pretty much all of the US and Canada. I've seen breeders posting dogs on there and people posting when they are looking for dogs, so you could always post there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,803 Posts
I think you would be a wonderful fit for a Doberman, there is just one thing that many first time Dobie owners forget: This is an expensive breed. Whether you get a rescue or from a reputable breeder, this breed is unfortunately riddled with genetic health problems. Be sure to have a savings account dedicated to vet costs, or get pet insurance.

DCM comes with the breed, no matter where you get your Dobe. A lot of Dobe savvy owners have a pro active plan in place, where they get annual blood work, echos, and holters done in addition to other annual wellness tests.

Don't be bummed if you dont get a Doberman within the time frame you mentioned, it is well worth the wait to find the perfect match :) Post pictures of your new fur baby once he/she arrives, thats a rule here on DT ;)
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top