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a.k.a. LupusSpirit
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Discussion Starter #1
Two questions:

I know there are many threads on here concerning vWD DNA testing but I haven't found one that concerns the vWD factor test. I work as a vet assistant but this disease perplexes me and I've seen vets be wrong before... my girl came back with a carrier percentage of 60%. The vet told me this is a good thing and it is ok for her to be spayed without complication. She told me the lower the percentage the worse it is, vise versa the higher percentage the better. 60% still seems low to me.. I mean there is a 40% probability that she wont clot properly for her surgery? Or perhaps I'm understanding that incorrectly.

Also Rozzie has a peculiar habit of shaking. Her body trembles as if having a very mild siezure when she sleeps and she also trembles when very excited. I'm used to seeing this in all sorts of small dogs, or dogs that are very fearfull.. but not while sleeping or day to day living. Any thoughts?
 

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Sea Hag
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Two questions:

I know there are many threads on here concerning vWD DNA testing but I haven't found one that concerns the vWD factor test. I work as a vet assistant but this disease perplexes me and I've seen vets be wrong before... my girl came back with a carrier percentage of 60%. The vet told me this is a good thing and it is ok for her to be spayed without complication. She told me the lower the percentage the worse it is, vise versa the higher percentage the better. 60% still seems low to me.. I mean there is a 40% probability that she wont clot properly for her surgery? Or perhaps I'm understanding that incorrectly.

Also Rozzie has a peculiar habit of shaking. Her body trembles as if having a very mild siezure when she sleeps and she also trembles when very excited. I'm used to seeing this in all sorts of small dogs, or dogs that are very fearfull.. but not while sleeping or day to day living. Any thoughts?
If your vet is talking about vWD test results in percentages, then she's referring to the ELISA blood test, which is totally unreliable. It has a high error rate (I tested one dog three times when that was the only test available, and got a result in each of the 3 possible categories). There's also an overlap between categories.

The only definitive test is the dna test marketed by Vetgen, anything else is a waste of time, money and the paper the results are printed on.
 

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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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If you use the genetic test by VetGen (which is done by sending away a cheek swab for testing and is MUCH more accurate than other tests), you really only have to worry if it comes back that the dog is affected--meaning he has a faulty vWD factor gene from each parent. If so, then the vet performing the surgery can prepare by having fresh frozen or cryoprecipitate (which contains the clotting factor needed) ready. A bleeding time should be done the day of the surgery also, because the levels of vWD factor can vary in the affected dog.

I've seen my dogs shake while they sleep, but it seems to indicate that they are cold (even if I'm not, the silly things). I cover them with an old beach towel and that's that. But it really doesn't look like seizure activity, so I don't know if we're talking about the same thing. Sometimes they shake when they're under stress, like at the vet's office. There is another kind of shaking or head bobbing that Dobes will sometimes exhibit--it will generally last a couple of minutes and often stops if the dog is distracted (food!!!), and seems to be harmless, though a bit scary looking.
 

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I can only say ditto to what Murreydobe has already said about the Elisa Assay (the test that measures vWD factor in the blood. By the way--it is only accurate for the moment in time when the blood was drawn and can be affected by illness, stress and many other things and is (as Murreydobe already said) highly inaccurate.

Do the gene test through VetGen and go to VenGen's website and read the information on the Elisa Assay for a more thorough explanation of what the percentage figures can mean.

A lot of short coated dogs like Dobes, Weimaraners, Boxers etc shiver in their sleep--it probably means nothing. And a lot of dogs tremble if they are awake and stressed.
 

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a.k.a. LupusSpirit
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Discussion Starter #5
Ugh that frustrates me that the vet I work with didn't tell me that this test is not very accurate and was the wrong test to do :( oh how I love vets being influenced by contracts with a lab.... grr. So this means I'll have to save up AGAIN to test before the big spay. Roz is now 13 months old and I've been wanting to get her spayed since her first heat cylce that she had to go through to correct an inverted vulva confirmations. When I got her I had a much better paying job and could do with all the expenses but unfortunately I have a less than satisfactory pay now so everything is saving up and saving up until I can manage. I feel jipped :/ Thank you for the input.

Well she shakes mainly when resting or overly excited. The resting part was what was worrying me. She has no other signs of illness or anything. She has been indoors a lot more lately due to horrible weather conditions. Could it be pent up energy I wonder? She acts relaxed though.. not like she's amped and needs to run.
 

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By any chance has your dog ears been done? If there was a problem with the bleeding out I would think it would have happened then. If I am wrong please someone correct me. I am not a vet.
 

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a.k.a. LupusSpirit
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Discussion Starter #7
By any chance has your dog ears been done? If there was a problem with the bleeding out I would think it would have happened then. If I am wrong please someone correct me. I am not a vet.
No I chose not to get her ears done. I don't disagree with other people doing it, but I just couldn't see myself putting my little girl through that- at that young of an age she appeared a bit more tender to things than her litter mates. I think her ears suit her well :)

but that doesn't really help me know if she has a problem or not :(

The only thing I have to go on is the previous from last time I quicked her it did bleed for quite some time even after I put corn startch on there several times. The next time I got actual quick stop and it didn't bleed for long. (I swear I'm great at doing nails she is just a wiggly thing and I always have to do it alone)
 

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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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vWD factor levels can vary and also tend to drop with age. But probably if her ears were done with no problem the spay will not present a problem, and a buccal bleeding time should give the vet an idea about your dog's clotting capabilities on the day of surgery.

I do know that I've seen "specials" on the price of a VetGen test--but I have no idea if there are regular sales or not. Perhaps someone else will chime in?

Might also want to try dremmeling her nails because I don't think the chances of pinking her are as great.
 

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Is it a shiver? Like she's cold?
 

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Ugh that frustrates me that the vet I work with didn't tell me that this test is not very accurate and was the wrong test to do :( oh how I love vets being influenced by contracts with a lab.... grr. So this means I'll have to save up AGAIN to test before the big spay. Roz is now 13 months old and I've been wanting to get her spayed since her first heat cylce that she had to go through to correct an inverted vulva confirmations. When I got her I had a much better paying job and could do with all the expenses but unfortunately I have a less than satisfactory pay now so everything is saving up and saving up until I can manage. I feel jipped :/ Thank you for the input.

Well she shakes mainly when resting or overly excited. The resting part was what was worrying me. She has no other signs of illness or anything. She has been indoors a lot more lately due to horrible weather conditions. Could it be pent up energy I wonder? She acts relaxed though.. not like she's amped and needs to run.
They can do the buccal mucosa test during a regular office visit and that is what is used the day of surgery to determine if the dog has good or poor clotting time. It is a simple tiny cut on the inside of the cheek and they check how long it takes to stop bleeding (about a minute is OK I believe).
 
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