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This is Bridgit Carlsen who I'm sure many of you of heard of, she is a very accomplished obedience trainer. This is her competing with her Golden Retriever Saucy. Very nice routine, the dog showing good drive and very pretty heeling!

Saucys BH - YouTube
 

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While I only dream of those quick sits and turns, I wonder how the new rules are going to change the heeling performance of the pros that we now covet? You know, the part where the pace of the dog is supposed to be more normal looking without the hopping, etc?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
While I only dream of those quick sits and turns, I wonder how the new rules are going to change the heeling performance of the pros that we now covet? You know, the part where the pace of the dog is supposed to be more normal looking without the hopping, etc?
I don't think it will change things much. Dogs must look happy and attentive to handler, with his/her shoulder at knee high. I've seen lots of dogs with that pretty obedience and they are not necessarily doing the bunny hop.
 
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Here is something I do not understand, use to be all that bumping into the handler would be counted off in points??? I also would think the dog's neck would be in jeopardy for injury having to look up constantly. Its not natural for the dog's head to be in that position can't see where he/she is even going. ???
 

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I guess I'm getting old, that doesn't look like heeling to me, dancing maybe...:confused:
 

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After watching the first video, I couldn't help but explore. I found a clip of her new puppy. This puppy is only 4 MONTHS old in this video! Granted, it's a Mal...but still.

tOxjd9I2PNA
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here is something I do not understand, use to be all that bumping into the handler would be counted off in points??? I also would think the dog's neck would be in jeopardy for injury having to look up constantly. Its not natural for the dog's head to be in that position can't see where he/she is even going. ???
I guess I'm getting old, that doesn't look like heeling to me, dancing maybe...:confused:

I think if the dog otherwise is not impeding the handler from moving I don't think points would be deducted. I'm not 100% sure. It would not be considered crowding and that's whats in the rules. And while the dog bumps her a few times I think the dog remains pretty straight in his heeling.

I don't know of any dogs personally with neck injury do to that type of healing. And yes they can see where they are going, out of the corner of there eye. Plus they do sneak little peaks here and there. ;) Do they see as well as dogs that heel with their heads down? I don't believe so.

I personally find it pretty nice, but I understand what you are saying. I also think it looks like dancing, and that's one of the reason I like it!
 
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Why does a dog need to see where they are going in heeling anyway? I would rather my dog have its head up totally focused on me and not know where they are going versus one that "heels" with its head down showing no effort or excitement to be working.

I know there are many different styles and purposes to heeling, but I just don't understand why there are so many people who don't like this style of heeling. The dog is praised for effort, so why wouldn't it put its all into everything it does? How is this not "correct"?
 

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Zeus thinks that the ground is constantly falling and insists on "watching the ground" whether it be heeling or him running freely in a field, he never trusts his ground and constantly looks down. When in a sit stay or down or standing he will maintain eye contact, but as soon as he has to move (heel or not) he is looking down. It is extremely difficult to keep his attention without him actually looking at me, so I agree that the dog constantly holding his head straight up towards the handler shouldn't be deducted. In order for the dog to maintain focus/eye contact while remaining by the side in correct position, I don't see how the dog could 'watch' the human without the severe neck degree.

I personally think the movements are beautiful, being a horse person makes me admire such floaty movement with suspension despite the fact that the 'floaty' over exaggerated movement is not necessary when heeling persay. JMO. Also, the video of her and the Mal pup is incredible! Thanks for sharing!
 

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She is and she is quite fun. She comes in and does a seminar here in St Louis every year in the Fall.

This last win (Crufts) she did to prove she still could do it. (apparently there were rumors that the Bishop didn`t have it anymore--well thats like waving a red flag in front of a bull:)) So she decided to prove them wrong.

The dogs she has she works. All different personalities. She never gets one and says this dog won`t work, I`ll try another. She is amazing. A great problem solver.

If you have a working slot she works until there is a solution with your problem. She is quite fun and her accent is something else. I adore her and her humor.
 

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I like anyone that can train their dog, but my all time favorite person that trains is Sylvia Bishop.
She won Crufts 2011. There heeling routines are 5 minutes long.



Sylvia Bishop & Currahee Red Hot Magic - Chilli Crufts 2011 Obedience Championships - YouTube
I think this is wonderful. Most importantly it shows a happy dog that is willing to work...everything obedience should be IMO. I have no idea how she can remember all the turns in that heeling pattern, though. Geez!
 

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Both routines were nice to watch. Bridget's routine was a very nice BH. Yes in a IPO trial she would lose a bit for the bouncing and the touching but not that much and the dog was straight and with great attention and drive.

The AKC obedience was very nice, very smooth. One thing that is interesting for me, in Schutzhund we would not be able to hold the hand in the position she did throughout the OB routine (without losing points for handler help), so it took a little getting used to watching that bit. Very beautiful to watch.

Here is my favorite handler. The video had gaps on my computer and it is not the very best routine they have ever done, but a 95 in OB here was good enough to win the BSP..

Eric vom Sportpark - Bsp 2009 - B:95 - YouTube
 

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Someone correct me if I am wrong because I have not seen many BH routines. (only online)
But it seems like the dogs head in BH routines are wrapped around to the front of the handler. In AKC they would call that a wrap and it is not encouraged. Dobermans have a natural tendency to heel this way. (head position in BH routines that I have seen).

Also the hand position in AKC-- left hand held over your belly button or can be loose at your side. With a big dog if your left arm is hanging on your left side you would have to hold your left arm out a bit to avoid hitting dogs head.
Sylvia`s hand position is correct for Crufts, but would not be correct here in the states for an AKC routine.
I`m of the opinion you can teach a dog to focus anywhere if you work at it.

Interesting and fun to watch all videos.
 
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