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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I do not post very often but I read the boards everyday! I did try to search this subject but only found one other thing(maybe I don't know how to use the search engine correctly). Anyways, my female Copper is 12 weeks old. Had been doing really well on the house training. On Wed night she started whining all the time and peeing on the floor in the house. We would take her outside, she would go, we would bring her in and she would pee on the floor. Thursday morning in a 2 hour time span she peed on the floor 9 times, including on her bed and in her crate. At this point I am thinking that there is something wrong. Call the vet and they have me come in and get a container to collect her pee. Neighbors probably think I am crazy as I am standing outside with a large spoon trying to get a urine sample. Get the sample and take it back to the vets. The vet called me later in the evening and said that the urine looks really good, but asks me to check her for discharge....low and behold she has some discharge. He said that it's a vaginal infection and common in female puppies as their immune system is not built up! He said that it should clear up on it's own but to keep on eye on it and bring her in if it does not. I have an appointment for her on Monday for another round of shots so I will have the vet check it then. Has anyone else experienced this??
 

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I have four girls and i have seen it plenty, that does not mean you don't have to keep an eye on her as she may need a course of antibiotics to help her clear it up.As you are at the vets on Monday he should check her out and take her temp as a matter of course but do watch her over the weekend and if it gets worse get her to the vet straight away.
 

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Plain yogurt and a lactobacillus, acidophilus combination works to in you want to go the natural way first and then antibiotics if there is no change in her condition. If the urine is clear at this point I personally would go the natural way first. I have been lucky over the years I have never had to get meds for any of my girls for that female department, just used what I have mentioned has worked for me, (my girls) lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok..no laughing, but what is this?? lactobacillus, acidophilus combination? I do know what yogurt is so I will pick some of that up in the morning.
 

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Replacing the "friendly" intestinal bacteria destroyed by antibiotics.
Preventing and/or reducing the recurrence of vaginal yeast infections, urinary tract infections, and cystitis (bladder inflammation). The best scientific evidence exists for vaginal infections.
Aiding digestion and suppressing disease-causing bacteria.
Preventing and treating diarrhea, including infectious diarrhea, particularly from rotavirus (a virus that commonly causes diarrhea in children).
Treating overgrowth of "bad" organisms in the gastrointestinal tract (a condition that tends to cause diarrhea and may occur from use of antibiotics).
Alleviating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome and, possibly, inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis).
Improving lactose absorption digestion in people who are lactose intolerant
Enhancing the immune response. Studies have suggested that consumption of yogurt or milk that contains specific strains of Lactobacillus or supplements with Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium may improve the natural immune response. Further research is needed to confirm these early findings and to best understand how the improved immune function may or may not help in warding off infections.
Aiding the treatment of respiratory infections such as sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia. More research is needed in this area.
Lowering risk of allergies. Examples include asthma, hay fever, food allergies to milk, and skin reactions such as eczema.
Helping to treat high cholesterol. More research is needed.
Reducing the risk of recurring bladder tumors once this cancer has been treated. Much more research is needed in this area.
Other conditions under investigation for use of probiotics include colon cancer, HIV related diarrhea, and Helicobacter pylori, an organism that can lead to development of ulcers.
 

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Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) is the most commonly used probiotic, or "friendly" bacteria. Such healthy bacteria inhabit the intestines and vagina and protect against the entrance and proliferation of "bad" organisms that can cause disease. This is accomplished through a variety of mechanisms. For example, the breakdown of food by L. acidophilus leads to production of lactic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and other byproducts that make the environment hostile for undesired organisms. L. acidophilus also produces lactase, the enzyme that breaks down milk sugar (lactose) into simple sugars. People who are lactose intolerant do not produce this enzyme. For this reason, L. acidophilus supplements may be beneficial for these individuals.

Other potential probiotics include a variety of Lactobacillus species (spp.), such as the caseiGG, rhamnosus, NCFM, DDS-1, and johnsonii strains, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecium, Saccharaomyces boulardii, Bacillus spp., and Escherichia coli.

Prebiotics refers to the soluble fiber component found in certain foods or supplements that stimulate the growth of probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract.

Lactobacillus Acidophilus
Also Known As: L. acidophilus, Lactobacillus species (spp.), Bifidobacterium spp.,

Dietary Sources

The primary dietary sources of L. acidophilus include milk enriched with acidophilus, yogurt containing live L. acidophilus cultures, miso, and tempeh.

Prebiotics are found in breast milk, onions, tomatoes, bananas, honey, barley, garlic and wheat.

You get the good quality at the health food stores

Available Forms

L. acidophilus preparations consist of dried or liquid cultures of living bacteria. These cultures are usually grown in milk but can sometimes be grown in milk-free cultures. L. acidophilus is available in the following forms:

Freeze-dried granules
Freeze-dried powders
Freeze-dried capsules
Liquid L. acidophilus preparations (which must be kept refrigerated)
 
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