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I have been reading about people choosing not to vaccinate and am wondering why. I have read people choosing to only do the "normal" puppy shots, and some who never give them at all. Meaning ever (well, besides rabies).

What do you do?

What is your reasoning?

Not looking to argue, just curious as to why.

I have only had one other dog who I chose to just do the puppy shots (including rabies and lepto). I did lepto only because I lived in the country and it was common in the area. After that, I did titers. Now, the vet I went to was a friend of the family so I never had to worry about him simply wanting to make money. In fact, I was surprised when he told me that after 30+ years of owning a vet practice, he still attends classes and seminars about all of the new findings, so to speak.

In my experience, most vets get stuck thinking in the "this is how we always did it" mentality. Or just want my money...

Anyway, what do you think?
 

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I think that unless one is of a fanatical mindset, there is no one right answer to this.

There are folks who believe that any and all vaccination leads to chronic disease and misery... I'm not going there.

There are folks who believe that if you don't religiously vaccinate for all sorts of stuff, your dog will DIE... I'm not going there, either.

I think you educate yourself the best you can, and make the decision that seems best to you... and then sit back and hope you were right.

I choose to do a couple of puppy vaccinations, and be done. I choose to keep legal on rabies (a legal issue, not a disease issue). I have chosen not to do any of the non-core vaccines (kennel cough, lepto, etc.).

If you believe that it is in your dog's best interest to be vaccinated against lepto, a single vaccine is pretty much pointless. Vaccination against viral diseases probably protects for the life of the dog. Vaccination against bacterial disease wears off.

I am not sure that vaccination is as much of a "vets want money" issue as it is a vaccine manufacturer issue; until recently, pretty much all DHPP vaccines were labeled as having a one-year duration of immunity... this is not because they wear off after one year, it is because they were never tested for disease protection beyond one year. It is not in the manufacturers' best economic interest to discover that their products would offer lifetime protection.
 

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I only do rabies every 3 years, as required by state law. I titer for everything else.

Why? After my research, this is what I feel is the best for my dogs. My vet is on board with this as well :)
 

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Got mutt?
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AAHA came out with new guidelines last year, recomending core puppy shots, an adult booster, and then revacinate at three year intervals. Rabies shots are to be done as legally required. Non-core vaccines should be given on a case-by-case basis (ie, Lymes in areas where that is a problem).

I've decided to go this route, but now, I will need to find someone to board my dogs that will also accept these guidelines. My vet will only board an animal if they have given shots within the last year. They do make a few exceptions (my geriatric hyperthyroid, epileptic kitty was one), but they can be stubborn about it.

The state of Texas requires a three-year rabies vaccine. However, the county I live in requires an annual vaccine. The local requrement superceeds the state requirement, in this case. :(
 
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I have been reading about people choosing not to vaccinate and am wondering why. I have read people choosing to only do the "normal" puppy shots, and some who never give them at all. Meaning ever (well, besides rabies).

What do you do?

What is your reasoning?

Not looking to argue, just curious as to why.

I have only had one other dog who I chose to just do the puppy shots (including rabies and lepto). I did lepto only because I lived in the country and it was common in the area. After that, I did titers. Now, the vet I went to was a friend of the family so I never had to worry about him simply wanting to make money. In fact, I was surprised when he told me that after 30+ years of owning a vet practice, he still attends classes and seminars about all of the new findings, so to speak.

In my experience, most vets get stuck thinking in the "this is how we always did it" mentality. Or just want my money...

Anyway, what do you think?
We only get Titers now. Here is a good video. Its long but lots of info. Dr Ronald Schultz has been studying vaccines for 30 yrs.

Dr. Karen Becker and Dr. Ronald Schultz on Pet Vaccines - YouTube
 

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We only get Titers now. Here is a good video. Its long but lots of info. Dr Ronald Schultz has been studying vaccines for 30 yrs.

Dr. Karen Becker and Dr. Ronald Schultz on Pet Vaccines - YouTube
^^^ Same here:
After all the puppy shot, did one adult rabies...we only do blood titers.
10 years later my dobe, still has rabies protection, confirmed by blood test.
- Titers testing run me $250 a visit

My first dog reacted to a rabies shot, 35 years ago.
- 15 minutes after leaving the vet, she was staggering like a drunk, and could hardly walk in the house.
- obviously, a bad reaction
I believe, over vascination, not healthy for the immune system.
 

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^^^ Same here:
After all the puppy shot, did one adult rabies...we only do blood titers.
10 years later my dobe, still has rabies protection, confirmed by blood test.
- Titers testing run me $250 a visit

My first dog reacted to a rabies shot, 35 years ago.
- 15 minutes after leaving the vet, she was staggering like a drunk, and could hardly walk in the house.
- obviously, a bad reaction
I believe, over vascination, not healthy for the immune system.
I don't know if some states will accept Rabies Titers? Heck some day cares and kennels will not accept Titers for boarding. These people have to get with the times. What are they saying your dog is going to get the other dogs sick? Well those other dogs are vaccinated! Daaa
 

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Vaccination Schedule Recommendations For Dogs



Dr. Jean Dodds' Recommended Vaccination Schedule

Vaccine Initial 1st Annual Booster Re-Administration Interval Comments

Distemper (MLV)

Initial (e.g. Intervet Progard Puppy) 9 weeks, 12 weeks, 16 - 20 weeks

1st Annual Booster: At 1 year MLV Distemper/Parvovirus only

Re-Administration Interval None needed.

Duration of immunity 7.5 / 15 years by studies. Probably lifetime. Longer studies pending. Can have numerous side effects if given too young (< 8 weeks).

Parvovirus (MLV)

Initial (e.g. Intervet Progard Puppy) 9 weeks, 12 weeks, 16 - 20 weeks

1st Annual Booster At 1 year MLV Distemper/ Parvovirus only

Re-Administration Interval None needed.

Duration of immunity 7.5 years by studies. Probably lifetime. Longer studies pending. At 6 weeks of age, only 30% of puppies are protected but 100% are exposed to the virus at the vet clinic.

Rabies

(killed) 24 weeks or older At 1 year (give 3-4 weeks apart from Dist/Parvo booster)
Killed 3 year rabies vaccine 3 yr. vaccine given as required by law in California (follow your state/provincial requirements) rabid animals may infect dogs.

Vaccines Not Recommended For Dogs

Distemper & Parvo @ 6 weeks or younger Not recommended.
At this age, maternal antibodies form the mothers milk (colostrum) will neutralize the vaccine and only 30% for puppies will be protected. 100% will be exposed to the virus at the vet clinic.

Corona Not recommended.
1.) Disease only affects dogs <6 weeks of age.
2.) Rare disease: TAMU has seen only one case in seven years.
3.) Mild self-limiting disease.
4.) Efficacy of the vaccine is questionable.

Leptospirosis Not recommended
1) There are an average of 12 cases reported annually in California.
2) Side effects common.
3) Most commonly used vaccine contains the wrong serovars. (There is no cross-protection of serovars) There is a new vaccine with 2 new serovars. Two vaccinations twice per year would be required for protection.).
4) Risk outweighs benefits.
Lyme Not recommended
1) Low risk in California.
2) 85% of cases are in 9 New England states and Wisconsin.
3) Possible side effect of polyarthritis from whole cell bacterin.

Boretella
(Intranasal)
(killed) Only recommended 3 days prior to boarding when required.
Protects against 2 of the possible 8 causes of kennel cough.
Duration of immunity 6 months.
Giardia Not recommended
Efficacy of vaccine unsubstantiated by independent studies


There are two types of vaccines currently available to veterinarians: modified-live vaccines and inactivated ("killed") vaccines.

Immunization Schedules
There is a great deal of controversy and confusion surrounding the appropriate immunization schedule, especially with the availability of modified-live vaccines and breeders who have experienced postvaccinal problems when using some of these vaccines. It is also important to not begin a vaccination program while maternal antibodies are still active and present in the puppy from the mother's colostrum. The maternal antibodies identify the vaccines as infectious organisms and destroy them before they can stimulate an immune response.

Many breeders and owners have sought a safer immunization program.

Modified Live Vaccines (MLV)
Modified-live vaccines contain a weakened strain of the disease causing agent. Weakening of the agent is typically accomplished by chemical means or by genetic engineering. These vaccines replicate within the host, thus increasing the amount of material available for provoking an immune response without inducing clinical illness. This provocation primes the immune system to mount a vigorous response if the disease causing agent is ever introduced to the animal. Further, the immunity provided by a modified-live vaccine develops rather swiftly and since they mimic infection with the actual disease agent, it provides the best immune response.

Inactivated Vaccines (Killed)
Inactivated vaccines contain killed disease causing agents. Since the agent is killed, it is much more stable and has a longer shelf life, there is no possibility that they will revert to a virulent form, and they never spread from the vaccinated host to other animals. They are also safe for use in pregnant animals (a developing fetus may be susceptible to damage by some of the disease agents, even though attenuated, present in modified-live vaccines). Although more than a single dose of vaccine is always required and the duration of immunity is generally shorter, inactivated vaccines are regaining importance in this age of retrovirus and herpesvirus infections and concern about the safety of genetically modified microorganisms. Inactivated vaccines available for use in dogs include rabies, canine parvovirus, canine coronavirus, etc.




W. Jean Dodds, DVM
HEMOPET
938 Stanford Street
Santa Monica, CA 90403
310/ 828-4804
fax: 310/ 828-8251

Note: This schedule is the one I recommend and should not be interpreted to mean that other protocols recommended by a veterinarian would be less satisfactory. It's a matter of professional judgment and choice. For breeds or families of dogs susceptible to or affected with immune dysfunction, immune-mediated disease, immune-reactions associated with vaccinations, or autoimmune endocrine disease (e.g., thyroiditis, Addison's or Cushing's disease, diabetes, etc.) the above protocol is recommended.

After 1 year, annually measure serum antibody titers against specific canine infectious agents such as distemper and parvovirus. This is especially recommended for animals previously experiencing adverse vaccine reactions or breeds at higher risk for such reactions (e.g., Weimaraner, Akita, American Eskimo, Great Dane).

Another alternative to booster vaccinations is homeopathic nosodes. This option is considered an unconventional treatment that has not been scientifically proven to be efficacious. One controlled parvovirus nosode study did not adequately protect puppies under challenged conditions. However, data from Europe and clinical experience in North America support its use. If veterinarians choose to use homeopathic nosodes, their clients should be provided with an appropriate disclaimer and written informed consent should be obtained.

I use only killed 3 year rabies vaccine for adults and give it separated from other vaccines by 3-4 weeks. In some states, they may be able to give titer test result in lieu of booster.

I do NOT use Bordetella, corona virus, leptospirosis or Lyme vaccines unless these diseases are endemic in the local area pr specific kennel. Furthermore, the currently licensed leptospira bacterins do not contain the serovars causing the majority of clinical leptospirosis today.

I do NOT recommend vaccinating bitches during estrus, pregnancy or lactation.

W. Jean Dodds, DVM
HEMOPET

Printable Titers Forms and Instructions for Testing: HEMOPET.HTM
 

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I don't know if some states will accept Rabies Titers? Heck some day cares and kennels will not accept Titers for boarding. These people have to get with the times. What are they saying your dog is going to get the other dogs sick? Well those other dogs are vaccinated! Daaa
^^^^ LOL, not in my world Daaa...my dobe never gets shipped off - EVER / and I could care less about State rules, she stays North of the border.
She will never go into a Day Care or Kennel, in her entire life, is at home &/or out and about with me...while breathing on this earth.

P.S. - I bought a 1.15 acre kennel property, several years ago / and shut it down, on Day1.
- I don't cage my own adult dog...sure not going to do it to any others

Amy has 2 Vets, for several years - one stellar respected holistic & one gifted surgeon with chiropractor & acupuncture skills.

When importing a dog into another country, vet shots will not guarantee the proper vaccination antibody protection levels.
(no data point, base line numbers or pass/fail summary)
- an expensive blood titer lab analyse will, and shipping a dog into some countries...is the measure of choice
- Amy hasn't had a rabies vaccination in a decade / she still has the legal level...and tested on a legal frequency
At 11.5 y/o now, I make life-long-decisions to maximize Amy's longivity and quality of life...PERIOD / after all, she is intrusted in my forever care.
 

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^^^^ LOL, not in my world Daaa...my dobe never gets shipped off - EVER / and I could care less about State rules, she stays North of the border.
She will never go into a Day Care or Kennel, in her entire life, is at home &/or out and about with me...care.[/I]
What do you do when you go on vacation? :)

I think the US vaccine rules are over the top, and I wish the titers were acceptable everywhere, but they are not. That being said, especially with baby puppies, some ARE necessary. Socialization is critical. I don't want me and my home to be my dogs whole existence. I want them to have every expierence possible, and safely. Puppies need things like PARVO vaccines. It's not a pretty way to go...
 

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What do you do when you go on vacation? :)

I think the US vaccine rules are over the top, and I wish the titers were acceptable everywhere, but they are not. That being said, especially with baby puppies, some ARE necessary. Socialization is critical. I don't want me and my home to be my dogs whole existence. I want them to have every expierence possible, and safely. Puppies need things like PARVO vaccines. It's not a pretty way to go...
^^^ As in my earliest post...my puppy gets all the shots recommended (by Vet) and also the full boosters, etc., as a young adult...parvo included.
- so for the first few years, had all the shots, under the sun / and she is super socialized and experiences many local places and people

Been on vacation twice (flew to Japan and East Coast) in the last decade.
- Mom stayed at home with dobe Amy and Dad accompanied our son, to compete in tournaments
If we had time for a full family vacation (which we don't yet)...it would most likely be in a 5th wheel camper, towed behind my 3/4 ton 4x4 pickup.
- Amy girl included (or next pup), or we would not consider travelling together
 

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Rabies shots are required every three years in my state. I decided not to get my dogs annual shots, only every three years at the same time as the rabies.

I didn't know about "titers," I will have to look into that. Perhaps they don't even need the shots every three years, sounds like they don't. I mean, I haven't had vaccinations every three years myself, why should dogs need them!? If I could figure a way around the rabies, I would. I have a special license to have as many animals as I have and the Animal Control department in my city keeps track of their rabies vaccinations. I have to renew the license every two years... so not sure if I can avoid the rabies vaccs.
 
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