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Euro Pup
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55 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Ladies and Gents,

Any recommendations on a European Doberman breeder in Texas or near by?

I’m looking to welcome a fur baby in the next few months.

Thanks,
Sam
 

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joie de vivre
Joined
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11,197 Posts
Hi EuroTX.

I noticed that you've been a member of the forum for a while (since 2013) and you've posted a few times asking for Euro breeder recommendations.

What breeders have you been looking at? Have you reached out to any of them over the years?

Do you have any plans for a Dobe? Are you wanting a sport dog? Show? Companion only?

If you're certain you want a European bred Doberman and, in 7 years you haven't identified any breeder in the US that meets your expectations, have you considered importing from a reputable European breeder?
 

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Euro Pup
Joined
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55 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hi brw1982,

I’ve been reaching out to local Texas breeders such as: Double J Doberman, Stellar Donberman, Sullys.

I’m looking for a companion dog who I can work here an there at local working clubs.

I have considered importing so any recommendations would be great. The reason why it’s taken me so long is because there was times I felt I was a good time to bring a dobe into the family but ultimately decided not to. I just purchased my new home and I feel I’m finally at the perfect time to add a fur baby to the family.
 

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Super Moderator
Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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24,830 Posts
Double J is advertising a litter of puppies planned for August. The sire is 110 POUNDS!! I don't know who the dam is, but they show one of their females as being 102 pounds and another at 87 pounds.

These are grossly oversized dobermans, and are unlikely to be suitable as working dogs. That's not a kennel you should patronize.
 

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joie de vivre
Joined
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11,197 Posts
Hi brw1982,

I’ve been reaching out to local Texas breeders such as: Double J Doberman, Stellar Donberman, Sullys.

I’m looking for a companion dog who I can work here an there at local working clubs.

I have considered importing so any recommendations would be great. The reason why it’s taken me so long is because there was times I felt I was a good time to bring a dobe into the family but ultimately decided not to. I just purchased my new home and I feel I’m finally at the perfect time to add a fur baby to the family.
I totally understand wanting to wait until the right time to bring home a pup. Nothing wrong with planning and being careful.

I've only briefly glanced over the sites of those breeders. Most of the dogs look bulky, they appear to be mostly untitled (there are some IABCA titles, which honestly aren't worth anything), and the health testing ranges from okay on some dogs, to spotty, to non-existent.

For me, personally, health testing is a major sticking point. There are some serious health problems in the Doberman breed. If I'm going to give someone money for a dog, I expect full and current health testing. Its not a guarantee of anything, but it does tell me the breeder is at least aware of health issues in the breed and they're trying to be transparent with puppy buyers about what's in their lines and what they're producing.

Also, I think if you want a Dobe who is primarily a companion but who you can dabble in IGP with, you can certainly find what you're looking for in the US. Really, for most of us who are primarily pet homes but involved in competitive sports with our dogs, we can find a good Doberman here in the US.

I've glanced over the breeders' sites you mentioned and I'm curious why you've picked those three breeders specifically. What are their strengths? What do they offer that check the right boxes for you?

Are they working and titling their dogs in sports? That's something I would be looking for if I wanted a potential sport prospect. Even if I just wanted a pup/dog to learn with, I would want to see a pedigree with dogs who have achieved titles in areas of interest to me.

IGP is a challenging sport. It really isn't enough just for a dog to be a Doberman. You'll want a pup out of proven parents and pedigrees. And the parents and pedigrees will be "proven" through the titles on the breeding dogs. Even if you think you want to dabble, I would encourage you to get a pup from proven parents / lines. Honestly, its not much fun to dabble in a sport with a dog who can't handle it. The only thing you will learn from that experience is that you need a dog who has some aptitude even just to dabble. You don't need a guaranteed podium dog but you will want a dog with some kind of potential to try it out and learn with them.

I would also encourage you to reach out to your local working club(s) and meet people first. Go to some training events if you can. See how they work the dogs. Start learning now. Its fine to dabble and many clubs will accommodate that but some are less accommodating.

Also, by getting familiar with the sport and a specific club in advance of having a pup, it might help you better estimate how involved you might end up wanting to be in the sport. Because if you find a club you like and you really like the sport, that might change your "wants" in a pup. You might end up wanting a more promising sport dog rather than a dabbling dog, which might narrow your search to a more specific subset of breeders. Or you might realize you're not that into sport and then that will open up more possibilities of lines and breeders for you to consider.

Picking a breeder is a personal decision. There are things that I might really care about that you don't, and vice versa. That's fine. But I do think its important to carefully consider what you want and how the breeders and lines match up to that. It would suck to have waited for so long to get the dog you want, and then to end up with a dog who isn't a good fit and/or from a breeder who turns out to be a snake oil salesman.

For more targeted feedback on trustworthy breeders producing Dobes who can dabble in working sport, you might want to reach out to Artemis or Rosamburg here on the forum. I don't think Rosamburg is on much but I know Artemis pops on every now and then. You might send them each a PM and ask for some breeder recommendations. I'd trust either one of their recommendations.
 

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Super Moderator
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21,134 Posts
I totally understand wanting to wait until the right time to bring home a pup. Nothing wrong with planning and being careful.

I've only briefly glanced over the sites of those breeders. Most of the dogs look bulky, they appear to be mostly untitled (there are some IABCA titles, which honestly aren't worth anything), and the health testing ranges from okay on some dogs, to spotty, to non-existent.

For me, personally, health testing is a major sticking point. There are some serious health problems in the Doberman breed. If I'm going to give someone money for a dog, I expect full and current health testing. Its not a guarantee of anything, but it does tell me the breeder is at least aware of health issues in the breed and they're trying to be transparent with puppy buyers about what's in their lines and what they're producing.

Also, I think if you want a Dobe who is primarily a companion but who you can dabble in IGP with, you can certainly find what you're looking for in the US. Really, for most of us who are primarily pet homes but involved in competitive sports with our dogs, we can find a good Doberman here in the US.

I've glanced over the breeders' sites you mentioned and I'm curious why you've picked those three breeders specifically. What are their strengths? What do they offer that check the right boxes for you?

Are they working and titling their dogs in sports? That's something I would be looking for if I wanted a potential sport prospect. Even if I just wanted a pup/dog to learn with, I would want to see a pedigree with dogs who have achieved titles in areas of interest to me.

IGP is a challenging sport. It really isn't enough just for a dog to be a Doberman. You'll want a pup out of proven parents and pedigrees. And the parents and pedigrees will be "proven" through the titles on the breeding dogs. Even if you think you want to dabble, I would encourage you to get a pup from proven parents / lines. Honestly, its not much fun to dabble in a sport with a dog who can't handle it. The only thing you will learn from that experience is that you need a dog who has some aptitude even just to dabble. You don't need a guaranteed podium dog but you will want a dog with some kind of potential to try it out and learn with them.

I would also encourage you to reach out to your local working club(s) and meet people first. Go to some training events if you can. See how they work the dogs. Start learning now. Its fine to dabble and many clubs will accommodate that but some are less accommodating.

Also, by getting familiar with the sport and a specific club in advance of having a pup, it might help you better estimate how involved you might end up wanting to be in the sport. Because if you find a club you like and you really like the sport, that might change your "wants" in a pup. You might end up wanting a more promising sport dog rather than a dabbling dog, which might narrow your search to a more specific subset of breeders. Or you might realize you're not that into sport and then that will open up more possibilities of lines and breeders for you to consider.

Picking a breeder is a personal decision. There are things that I might really care about that you don't, and vice versa. That's fine. But I do think its important to carefully consider what you want and how the breeders and lines match up to that. It would suck to have waited for so long to get the dog you want, and then to end up with a dog who isn't a good fit and/or from a breeder who turns out to be a snake oil salesman.

For more targeted feedback on trustworthy breeders producing Dobes who can dabble in working sport, you might want to reach out to Artemis or Rosamburg here on the forum. I don't think Rosamburg is on much but I know Artemis pops on every now and then. You might send them each a PM and ask for some breeder recommendations. I'd trust either one of their recommendations.
Quoting so you reread this! Brigette is spot-on.
 

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Euro Pup
Joined
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55 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I totally understand wanting to wait until the right time to bring home a pup. Nothing wrong with planning and being careful.

I've only briefly glanced over the sites of those breeders. Most of the dogs look bulky, they appear to be mostly untitled (there are some IABCA titles, which honestly aren't worth anything), and the health testing ranges from okay on some dogs, to spotty, to non-existent.

For me, personally, health testing is a major sticking point. There are some serious health problems in the Doberman breed. If I'm going to give someone money for a dog, I expect full and current health testing. Its not a guarantee of anything, but it does tell me the breeder is at least aware of health issues in the breed and they're trying to be transparent with puppy buyers about what's in their lines and what they're producing.

Also, I think if you want a Dobe who is primarily a companion but who you can dabble in IGP with, you can certainly find what you're looking for in the US. Really, for most of us who are primarily pet homes but involved in competitive sports with our dogs, we can find a good Doberman here in the US.

I've glanced over the breeders' sites you mentioned and I'm curious why you've picked those three breeders specifically. What are their strengths? What do they offer that check the right boxes for you?

Are they working and titling their dogs in sports? That's something I would be looking for if I wanted a potential sport prospect. Even if I just wanted a pup/dog to learn with, I would want to see a pedigree with dogs who have achieved titles in areas of interest to me.

IGP is a challenging sport. It really isn't enough just for a dog to be a Doberman. You'll want a pup out of proven parents and pedigrees. And the parents and pedigrees will be "proven" through the titles on the breeding dogs. Even if you think you want to dabble, I would encourage you to get a pup from proven parents / lines. Honestly, its not much fun to dabble in a sport with a dog who can't handle it. The only thing you will learn from that experience is that you need a dog who has some aptitude even just to dabble. You don't need a guaranteed podium dog but you will want a dog with some kind of potential to try it out and learn with them.

I would also encourage you to reach out to your local working club(s) and meet people first. Go to some training events if you can. See how they work the dogs. Start learning now. Its fine to dabble and many clubs will accommodate that but some are less accommodating.

Also, by getting familiar with the sport and a specific club in advance of having a pup, it might help you better estimate how involved you might end up wanting to be in the sport. Because if you find a club you like and you really like the sport, that might change your "wants" in a pup. You might end up wanting a more promising sport dog rather than a dabbling dog, which might narrow your search to a more specific subset of breeders. Or you might realize you're not that into sport and then that will open up more possibilities of lines and breeders for you to consider.

Picking a breeder is a personal decision. There are things that I might really care about that you don't, and vice versa. That's fine. But I do think its important to carefully consider what you want and how the breeders and lines match up to that. It would suck to have waited for so long to get the dog you want, and then to end up with a dog who isn't a good fit and/or from a breeder who turns out to be a snake oil salesman.

For more targeted feedback on trustworthy breeders producing Dobes who can dabble in working sport, you might want to reach out to Artemis or Rosamburg here on the forum. I don't think Rosamburg is on much but I know Artemis pops on every now and then. You might send them each a PM and ask for some breeder recommendations. I'd trust either one of their recommendations.

Such great advice and awesome reply! :)

I completely agree with your approach on the topic. I definitely don’t want to dabble and not have the adequate pup to do so.
 

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I do not know Double J but here are some concerns. I don't see many testing of the hips, I didn't see any echos, I didn't see holter testing on most of the dogs, or thyroid or full blood panels.

My biggest concern was that their oldest dog is 4 years old. Perhaps they haven't been breeding long? Or are their dogs dying young? I don't love the pedigrees of most of them. I would suggest finding out who the breeding pair is and then looking up how each dog died and at what age via google.

This is my same request no matter what breeder your decide with. See copies of health testing and research the pedigrees.
 

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Big Lil pup
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6,120 Posts
My youngest was sired by Cambria's Highly Regarded "Rayden" It was conception via AI, so I never dealt with Cambria, only Foxfire, the breeder of McCoy's dam. (As well as our last 2 boys)

However, I can tell you, having owned several Dobermans over the years, that my boy is everything I look for in a Dobe. He is handsome and healthy with a wonderful temperament. At pushing 6, he has never been sick. He passed his last full cardio workup with flying colors.

That being said, i should tell you that all of my boys have been purchased as family pet/companions never for true completion in any venue.

John Lichtwardt
Portland OR
 

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Does anyone have experience with Cambria Dobermans?

https://www.cambriadobes.com/bitches.php
If you are seriously looking for an IPO or IPG or whatever it's called these days you should know that Cambria, while they've bred some pretty remarkable dogs is pretty strictly a show (as in conformation) breeder.

I know a few Cambria dogs who have had the kind of temperament that would be suitable for a dog that you wanted for more than just dilly dallying with--and I doubt that Cambria would have that kind of dog often.

If you want further information about Cambria and Jim White please send me a pm.

dobebug
 

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Super Moderator
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Such great advice and awesome reply! :)

I completely agree with your approach on the topic. I definitely don’t want to dabble and not have the adequate pup to do so.
If you're looking for a dog to do sports, you really, really need to look at breeders who have dogs titled in those sports. Just my opinion, but I think you'll be disappointed if your dog isn't capable of doing the sports you want.

I suggest you contact breeders through the United Doberman Club (https://uniteddobermanclub.com/) (https://www.facebook.com/uniteddobermanclub/).

Be honest about what you're looking for - a dog capable of learning with, doing some intro level/basic competition, family companion. A good sports breeder can match you with a fun, first level competition dog.

There's nothing worse for people than getting into a sport and being frustrated with a dog that simply isn't cut out for it. There are GREAT breeders in the UDC. Be willing to look a bit farther away from your immediate location. Get on their Facebook page and make an intro post like you did here, but state that you're looking for a first sport dog, new to sports, but really want a great first dog to try things out. There are good, supportive breeders who will help you out. You've been this patient, so I'm betting you'll be willing to be patient enough to wait a bit longer for them to help connect you to the right person. The UDC FB page also has members who are competing with their dogs, and they can give you feedback, too.

I'd also connect with the club you're going to be training at, see if any of them have Dobermans, can give you feedback on breeders.
 

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I think you should get involved with a club before getting a puppy. Some people really don't want a person who's just willing to dabble, as you say, training with them. They want a serious commitment. If you want a companion you could do obedience, agility, scent work, dock diving etc. I don't see why a show bred dog wouldn't fit that bill. If you were looking for a show dog I think the whites could have something for you but a companion/working prospect probably not the best choice.
 

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ZuriBug
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184 Posts
We got our first doberman from Jim and Ann, Cambria Dobermans in 2012. She was a companion but she was very well tempered and beautiful. I did see recently, Jim posted needing a companion home for a male pup but wanted him to compete in agility or obedience I think. It's best to reach them by phone. Emails are hit or miss.
 
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