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:cry:

Ace ran to greet someone yesterday. The lady had a puppy and she got scared and hurried out of the field before my partner could get there.
He obviously wanted to play and was doing his vocal play voice. Which someone may mistake for a growl.
Scott (my partner)was very apologetic when he saw her later on in the day. She said it was ok it just scared her because her ppupy is young and ace was barking and growling.

then on facebook she puts to me on a friends status @I suggest you put him on a lead because he went for me and my puppy, next time i will report you'

I have never been so angry EVER. Yes we no that its our fault he ran to them and yes it would be scary for some. but to say my dog "went" for them???
If he wanted them im sure someone would of got bit. He has never growled or showed any aggression to any one else we've met or anyone i our home. I find it very insulting that she would say one thing to scott and a different thing on a social networking site and probably to most of our community.

Ace will now be let off in small fields where he can't run too far away. and a long line for bigger areas. Also training will step up.

Are your Dobies noisy players? Ace likes to nudge and nose and barks etc when he plays. Not all the time tho.
 

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When you own a breed like this, it's incumbent upon you to never give anyone a reason to fear your dog. They have a reputation as it is, and many people are and will be scared of your dog no matter how well trained it is. To allow your dog the opportunity to run up to another off leash is very irresponsible dog ownership no matter the breed, not to mention just inconsiderate of others.

You may not like the terminology, but yes, your dog did go for hers--in order play most likely, but that's not something that someone should have to wonder about. This breed is very physical and very vocal and most other dogs really do not enjoy their type of play.

No one enjoys being rushed by off-leash dogs. Hell, I own a Doberman and wouldn't want to be run-at by a strange off leash one. What if her dog had bitten yours in self-defense? You can bet that it's your dog that would be to blame no matter who actually bit. Don't ever put your dog in that situation again, for his own sake if nothing else.

If you know he's not trustworthy off leash, then keep a long line on him, and/or only go to fenced in areas to let him off leash. This breed doesn't need anymore poor publicity.

And speaking as someone who has owned both a very shy dog, and a very assertive dog, I can understand why she was very upset with you, and might not have wanted to continue with a confrontation then. Take what she said to heart and don't give her a reason to report you or your dog.
 

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When you own a breed like this, it's incumbent upon you to never give anyone a reason to fear your dog. They have a reputation as it is, and many people are and will be scared of your dog no matter how well trained it is. To allow your dog the opportunity to run up to another off leash is very irresponsible dog ownership no matter the breed, not to mention just inconsiderate of others.

You may not like the terminology, but yes, your dog did go for hers--in order play most likely, but that's not something that someone should have to wonder about. This breed is very physical and very vocal and most other dogs really do not enjoy their type of play.

No one enjoys being rushed by off-leash dogs. Hell, I own a Doberman and wouldn't want to be run-at by a strange off leash one. What if her dog had bitten yours in self-defense? You can bet that it's your dog that would be to blame no matter who actually bit. Don't ever put your dog in that situation again, for his own sake if nothing else.

If you know he's not trustworthy off leash, then keep a long line on him, and/or only go to fenced in areas to let him off leash. This breed doesn't need anymore poor publicity.

And speaking as someone who has owned both a very shy dog, and a very assertive dog, I can understand why she was very upset with you, and might not have wanted to continue with a confrontation then. Take what she said to heart and don't give her a reason to report you or your dog.
He's always been trustworthy before. Its only been this past week that he's been "playing up" with his recalls.
I understand that she was upset, that wasn't the problem. Its the fact she said one thing to my partner and another on facebook.

We were in the process of looking at long leads to help retrain his recall.
Believe me i have taken it all to heart, i've been on the verge of tears all day.
My boy means the world to me, my partner and my 2 children.

He's been off lead ever since he was allowed out. The route my partner took is one he goes on everyday and he has met lots of other dogs and people and everyone always comments on how lovely he is.

I can assure you that myself and partner care about how Dobermans are percieved. And want our dog to be a balanced dog that makes the breed proud.

He is only 15 months old and from what i've read they tend to go through moments of not listening and testing boundaries.
 

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He's always been trustworthy before. Its only been this past week that he's been "playing up" with his recalls.

The route my partner took is one he goes on everyday and he has met lots of other dogs and people and everyone always comments on how lovely he is.
Does this mean that he is often off-leash and runs up to others? If so, then I think you're lucky to have made it to 15 months without someone getting really upset with you.

Bottom line is that if it's not a leash-free area, don't let your dog off-leash. People who are following the law and have leashed their dogs (or who don't have a dog and perhaps don't like them or are afraid) should not have to worry that off-leash dogs are going to charge them randomly. I used to be VERY upset with people who let their dog run up to my very shy--and later in life physically unstable--Dobe. He did not enjoy meeting dogs that way, and could have seriously been hurt by people who thought their dog was friendly so of course mine wanted to meet it. My current dog would very likely put your dog in his place very fast if it were to charge us--and no one would enjoy that.

I understand that she was upset, that wasn't the problem. Its the fact she said one thing to my partner and another on facebook.
Would you have been happier if she had blasted you verbally then as well as on facebook?

I'm glad that you're looking into long lines and such. Have a look at the video below as well for the perspective of the other person.
Off leash dog compassion- dog training - YouTube
 

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And it sounds like he may have reached his teenager time--which may last until he's 24 months or even longer.

He may also be starting a more adult pattern of being interested in other dogs--is he neutered? If not, he probably should be. Neutering won't stop all of his interest in other dogs, but it should make it easier for you to deal with him and train him to behave properly around other dogs.

In a 15 month old, you may see a big change in his personality and behavior--he is not totally mature yet and may be starting to show what his adult behavior will be like.

Time spent training and a long leash are your two best friends to get you through the next few months.
 

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Does this mean that he is often off-leash and runs up to others? If so, then I think you're lucky to have made it to 15 months without someone getting really upset with you.

Bottom line is that if it's not a leash-free area, don't let your dog off-leash. People who are following the law and have leashed their dogs (or who don't have a dog and perhaps don't like them or are afraid) should not have to worry that off-leash dogs are going to charge them randomly. I used to be VERY upset with people who let their dog run up to my very shy--and later in life physically unstable--Dobe. He did not enjoy meeting dogs that way, and could have seriously been hurt by people who thought their dog was friendly so of course mine wanted to meet it. My current dog would very likely put your dog in his place very fast if it were to charge us--and no one would enjoy that.


Would you have been happier if she had blasted you verbally then as well as on facebook?

I'm glad that you're looking into long lines and such. Have a look at the video below as well for the perspective of the other person.
Off leash dog compassion- dog training - YouTube
It was a leash free area. Its farm land we are allowed on. Everyone lets there dogs off there. But not many people use it. Thats why its always been a nice off leash walk for Ace.
He doesn't normally Charge Dogs, he usually smells and play either intitiates or it doesn't.

When my partner spoke to her it was later in the evening in a shop> He went up to her and apoligised and she laughed and smiled and said it was ok but she was just scared.
Its the saying one thing to our face hours after the incident and then something different through the internet the day after that i didnt like.
I'm sure we will meet herself and puppy again and i can hopefully show her that Ace isn't aggressive. I hope you don't think i am saying she had no right to be upset? I just don't think my dog would go to bite her or her puppy who is just able to go outdoors. And i would rather her of said to us how she felt rather than save for a social networking site.

Thank you for the link. I will look at it and assure you i will put it to use :)
 

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And it sounds like he may have reached his teenager time--which may last until he's 24 months or even longer.

He may also be starting a more adult pattern of being interested in other dogs--is he neutered? If not, he probably should be. Neutering won't stop all of his interest in other dogs, but it should make it easier for you to deal with him and train him to behave properly around other dogs.

In a 15 month old, you may see a big change in his personality and behavior--he is not totally mature yet and may be starting to show what his adult behavior will be like.

Time spent training and a long leash are your two best friends to get you through the next few months.
He has been neutered and luckily never reached the humping or marking stage before we did it lol.
He's always been very much puppy like. So maybe he's only just maturing and starting to try and be independent?

I have 2 young children aged 3 and 7 so i can assure you i take all his behaviour seriously. I tried to sociallise him as much as possible from a young age. We went to training classes and i've always kept rules and boundaries. He has no food or toy aggression and plays well with dogs.
LOVES people he just wants to kiss them. Although he is a jumper but that only happens to people who excitedly pet him.
 

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It was a leash free area. Its farm land we are allowed on. Everyone lets there dogs off there. But not many people use it. That's why its always been a nice off leash walk for Ace.

Hmm--if this was a leash-free area, then I apologize for my previous post. If the lady was aware that this was a leash-free area then I do wonder why she was going there with a puppy on leash? What a terrible way to socialize her pup; the poor thing is going to get a lot of this sort of interaction which isn't ideal.

I do wonder about the legality of the situation though. In true leash-free parks I believe there are signs posted about waiving legalities regarding bites/injuries on the property. She's threatening to report your dog and technically it is off leash...if something were to happen I can't help but think you'd still be at fault. Also, I'm sure you realize this, but leashing your dog (long leash or short) and then taking it to this area is not a good idea, and is a very good way for him/someone else to get hurt. Many people find that dog parks aren't great fits for their Doberman's, especially as they mature.

I would be following your initial plan of long line in more secure areas as well as increased training as your dog hits adolescence.
 
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