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^ Hilarious!
 
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Leo, Lily, and Simon
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There is a class running this session on handling reactive dogs, taught by Amy Cook. Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - BH150: Management for Reactive Dogs It's a different technique than Denise uses, but just about everyone I've talked to that's taken it has seen improvement.

And to help you with the play skills used in the class, Denise is teaching a personal play workshop starting on Sunday. Fenzi Dog Sports Academy - WW239: June 6- Personal Play: just you and your dog! (REPEAT) The little fluff-bucket and I have a working spot in this one. :)

And MeadowCat's suggestion to join The High Drive Dog - Training with Denise Fenzi is a good one. Denise calls it "method agnostic", meaning that while she chooses to train without aversives, people using any training method (barring outright abuse) are welcome.
 

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I would try approaching the dog and stopping as soon as your dog tenses up bu before it starts vocalizing, here i would just stand chilling until the dog shows signs of redirecting attention and calming. At this point i would praise the dog and walk away from the stresser.

I would keep doing this trying to get closer and have the pet become used to the routine of settling down to make the stressful situation go away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
UPDATE:
I found a trainer who works with high-drive working dogs and we had our first class near other dogs (GSD, Malinois, a Doberman, a few Border Collies, and a lurcher (can someone edify me? what is that - it looked like a pit bull blend)).

During our consultation, I was happy that they were able to tell me all manner of Doberman-specific things on which YOU, the experts have all ready, have already educated me. They seem to understand the breed, which was such a relief since none of the other trainers I’ve found in DC seem to know or even appreciate them. Best of all, they stated that Beau needs to be in class with other dogs (which is what I’ve thought for months) despite any noise he may make. It is the first place that actually welcomed, and seemed enthused to have, a Doberman in class and were surprised at everything he knows how to do.

For our first session, As expected, Beau was SUPER vocal and bouncy and wanted to play with everyone. After only 5 minutes of pulling, screaming and begging to get to the other dogs, he gave up and was able to put his focus back on me for the most part. Huzzah!!! He was pretty good on heeling drills past the other dogs but would give a pitiful yodel everytime we went by a female Mal and go into a play bow, as much as possible when in motion. She was unimpressed. Everything else he did like a champ and was the only pup who held a stay longer than 2 minutes, even around the other dogs.

I am pleased that their approach isn’t cookie cutter, it is tailored to Beau, to me, and to our short-, near-, and long-term goals. There is no set number of sessions, more of a “it takes what it takes” to get where we want to be AND (and the nerd in me loves this…) we have to pass a test before we can move ahead. Once we get through 101 and 201, we can move to CGC prep, off-leash, intro SAR, or other disciplines should we so choose.

My id and my ego are a bit bruised that we didn’t place into 201, but my superego is okay with it and looking forward to our next class.

Here is my little weirdo when we got home after class.
139572
 

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Neo Puppy, Lanah Chi-Cairn X 6 y/o, RIP Eva HADR Rescue Dobe, Sunking's Spock, Lillah Chi-Terrier X
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MMC - Congrats on finding a good trainer and making good progress with Beau!


However, you forgot the caption on that cheesecake pic of Beau....

"Dad, Should I Instagram This Pic to that Mali Babe?" 😊

139573
 

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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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Lurchers are cross-bred (sighthound with something else), more or less hunting dogs--generally big, sighthoundish but variable according to the specific breeds in their ancestry.

I associate the name and "breed" with English country estate dogs somehow--probably because the first time I saw the name, I was reading a book set in the early 1800's.
 

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So glad you had a great class! You know I'm a fan of group classes and I'm thrilled you found one that will work for you!
 

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UPDATE:
I found a trainer who works with high-drive working dogs and we had our first class near other dogs (GSD, Malinois, a Doberman, a few Border Collies, and a lurcher (can someone edify me? what is that - it looked like a pit bull blend)).

During our consultation, I was happy that they were able to tell me all manner of Doberman-specific things on which YOU, the experts have all ready, have already educated me. They seem to understand the breed, which was such a relief since none of the other trainers I’ve found in DC seem to know or even appreciate them. Best of all, they stated that Beau needs to be in class with other dogs (which is what I’ve thought for months) despite any noise he may make. It is the first place that actually welcomed, and seemed enthused to have, a Doberman in class and were surprised at everything he knows how to do.

For our first session, As expected, Beau was SUPER vocal and bouncy and wanted to play with everyone. After only 5 minutes of pulling, screaming and begging to get to the other dogs, he gave up and was able to put his focus back on me for the most part. Huzzah!!! He was pretty good on heeling drills past the other dogs but would give a pitiful yodel everytime we went by a female Mal and go into a play bow, as much as possible when in motion. She was unimpressed. Everything else he did like a champ and was the only pup who held a stay longer than 2 minutes, even around the other dogs.

I am pleased that their approach isn’t cookie cutter, it is tailored to Beau, to me, and to our short-, near-, and long-term goals. There is no set number of sessions, more of a “it takes what it takes” to get where we want to be AND (and the nerd in me loves this…) we have to pass a test before we can move ahead. Once we get through 101 and 201, we can move to CGC prep, off-leash, intro SAR, or other disciplines should we so choose.

My id and my ego are a bit bruised that we didn’t place into 201, but my superego is okay with it and looking forward to our next class.

Here is my little weirdo when we go home after class.
View attachment 139572

I spit coffee over this PIC !!!! LOL
 

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Lurchers are cross-bred (sighthound with something else), more or less hunting dogs--generally big, sighthoundish but variable according to the specific breeds in their ancestry.

I associate the name and "breed" with English country estate dogs somehow--probably because the first time I saw the name, I was reading a book set in the early 1800's.
I thought they were sighthound crossed with things like Labs but wiki says that typically they are sighthound crossed with either herding or terrier types.

dobebug/ABTLH
 

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Yeah, I always pictured them as looking more "serious", rather than greyhoundy--more like a sorta coarse Rhodesian Ridgeback or something. But the internet never lies 😉 so I guess it's got it right.
 

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Leo, Lily, and Simon
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Yes, lurchers are typically a herding or terrier breed crossed with either Greyhound or Whippet, depending on the desired size and function of the cross.

A longdog is a cross between two or more sighthound breeds.
 
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