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First off I’d like to say this forum is amazing! I’ve learned so much here it’s overwhelming! I don’t post much but I’ve been lurking for a while.
I have a 9 month old male that I adopted two months ago. Since day 1 he’s had Cow Pattie stool. I’ve sent samples to the Vet 3-4 times and everything comes back ok. The food is Chicken Based and is 25/14. I’ve added Pumpkin and Probiotics but the issue remains. He is gaining weight and looks great! I guess I am to assume he has a sensitive stomach. If I switch to Pro Plan Sensitive, should I switch to Large Breed Puppy, Large Breed Adult or Adult? If not Pro Plan, is there any other sensitive stomach brand you would suggest?

Thanks in advance!
 

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At 9 months he doesn't need a puppy food--feed the adult and not the "shredded blend"--the one they used to call Focus is now labeled Special (or maybe Specialized). Geeze, I thought I paid a lot of attention to Purina's attempt to describe the food that they market--now there's a Large Breed Adult? Well, in theory at least Dobes are a medium breed so just get the regular Adult.

This is the one I've fed for years very successfully. The fact that he's had cow pie stools right along and has been checked (pumpkin really only works well where a dog need added fiber so I don't add it unless the diarrhea or soft stools are a sudden development) Try feeding him a little less food--particularly with puppies the very common problem that creates soft stools or frank diarrhea is overfeeding. Most puppies will eat everything and overeat if they can. The fact that he seems to be in good health and gaining weight is kind of suggestive that he might be getting too much food.

I don't know whose chicken formula you've been feeding but I've also fed the ProPlan Chicken and Rice--and had no problems with that but I really like the salmon based one--most of my dogs have loved it, ate it like it was the best thing ever and had firm fairly small stools and energy to burn as well as shiny coats.

Hills does have a sensitive stomach formula in their line and a friend who has Bullmastiffs and has had endless problems with soft stools (cow pie to mush) tried that several years ago and has had very good success with it. Just something else to try--not all dogs need the same food and some do better on some formulas.

Good luck if you choose try the change.

dobebug
 

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If and when you change take it real slow .......little bit ...little bit......nothing fires up the pooper faster than a quick change In diet.

No other stuff just the current food with the new food your introducing.

By not adding the extras... YET......if problems arise during this transition you will only have 2 products that your dog is ingesting....thus less guess work.

Trust me I learned this lesson the hard way years ago......LOL
 

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Hi There! I just came across your post and wanted to give you some info on my experience with Pro Plan Sensitive Large Breed. My 10 month old female (now 1 1/2 years old) was scratching all the time and my vet determined that she had a chicken allergy. The vet recommended that we switch from Pro Plan Large Breed to Pro Plan Sensitive Large Breed (which is salmon and rice). Within about a week she stopped scratching and her stool was noticeably firmer. It is the only food we use and have been very happy with it. To answer your original question, yes, you should be getting the large breed version of the Pro Plan Sensitive. It has additional ingredients for bone and joint health that is especially important for large breed dogs.
 

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First off I’d like to say this forum is amazing! I’ve learned so much here it’s overwhelming! I don’t post much but I’ve been lurking for a while.
I have a 9 month old male that I adopted two months ago. Since day 1 he’s had Cow Pattie stool. I’ve sent samples to the Vet 3-4 times and everything comes back ok. The food is Chicken Based and is 25/14. I’ve added Pumpkin and Probiotics but the issue remains. He is gaining weight and looks great! I guess I am to assume he has a sensitive stomach. If I switch to Pro Plan Sensitive, should I switch to Large Breed Puppy, Large Breed Adult or Adult? If not Pro Plan, is there any other sensitive stomach brand you would suggest?

Thanks in advance!
Hello Lady D
My first post on this forum. We have a 7 month old male Dobie since he was 8 months old. Breeder fed him Purina Large breed puppy, Vet agreed this was a good brand. Well his stools were pudding like for months. We let him eat on demand, he ate slow and often. Also, we used freeze dried liver treats for training purpose. All was fine until our pup was 5 months old, and he started to have diarrhea.
Brought him to the vet. All the parasite tests were run and he was clear. Vet put him on antibiotics and probiotics and we started him on psyllium husk. During this time we fed him rice, turkey and pumpkin. Stools got better, and on the 8th day we introduced him to the Proplan for sensitive stomach, and the diarrhea came back. Vet prescribed the Purina HA, his diarrhea got worse. I felt our pup may have a corn sensitivity, so we moved to a Designor food for now, Farmina. Well, after 4 days of two feedings, which included psyllium husk eat feeding and no treats, he is back to pudding / firmer stools.
This is a work in progress but wanted to share our story.
 

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I do not let any of my dogs, puppies or adult feed on demand...for one thing it deprives you, the owner of an early warning of something going wrong when a dog that normally eats well suddenly doesn't want to eat.

Secondly puppies in particular will almost always overeat when fed this way. Even when feeding meals and not "pm demand" a lot of puppies act so starved that the owners end up feeding too much and guess what happens--soft stools, pudding poop and diarrhea.

The first thing I'd try is feeding meals instead of on demand so that you actually know how much the puppy is eating. At 7 months food allergies would be rare and even sensitivities would be rare. Corn as a part of the content of most kibbles gets an undeserved bad name and frankly according to a nutritionist I know is very rarely found to be the cause of a suspected allergy.

What you've described really sounds more like plain overfeeding. If the dog is getting more food than is needed increased fecal output is predictable. Have you told your vet that you are not feeding meal but "on demand"? Have you tried measuring how much the puppy is eating by keeping track of how much food you put in his bowl on a daily basis?

dobebug
 

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I have to add a Plus 1 to what @dobebug wrote but did want to mention (based on my experience) that even if the vet ran a fecal panel, they may not have tested for giardia. This was something I had to keep harping on until they ran it on my boy and, sure enough, it came back positive. Once his giardia cleared up, his poop solidified.

This does not take away from the issue of free feeding a puppy (a recipe for soft poop, overeating, and unpredictable elimination), but worthy of a mention.

If you are 100% sure your vet tested for giardia, ignore me.
Good luck!
 

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I have to add a Plus 1 to what @dobebug wrote but did want to mention (based on my experience) that even if the vet ran a fecal panel, they may not have tested for giardia. This was something I had to keep harping on until they ran it on my boy and, sure enough, it came back positive. Once his giardia cleared up, his poop solidified.

This does not take away from the issue of free feeding a puppy (a recipe for soft poop, overeating, and unpredictable elimination), but worthy of a mention.

If you are 100% sure your vet tested for giardia, ignore me.
Good luck!
Portland is practically the only place you don't have to beg on bended knee to get your vets to do either giardia or coccidia tests.

I've always figured it's because Oregon (at least the west side of the state) is giardia paradise--giardia is the official state parasite. I've told this story before--when I was teaching my dog to track, for 3 or 4 years I spend every Wednesday in or around Salem--often in grass fields, orchards or big parks--all great places to have your dog pick up giardia. After about six months of me bringing in stool samples because my best tracker came up with a new case of giardia on average every 3 or 4 months, his vet gave me an endless refill prescription for metronidazole (the most common med to get rid of giardia). There is no earthly way of keeping a dog who is at the end of a 40 foot leash to not drink out of farm ponds, little creeks and drainage ditches in the fields, orchards and parks.

dobebug/ABTLH
 
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