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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When people say sweet potato's, are "they" using it interchangeably w/ yams? Are sweet potato's also good for diarrhea as pumpkin? And how about pumpkin vs say hubbard squash or other hard/orange squashes?
 

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kopfgeschlagen
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Pumpkin is great for firming up your dog's poops. Elke has a sensitive stomach so I always keep pumpkin around to mix in with her food if she is having a little trouble (2 tbsp approx).

The names sweet potatoes and yams are used interchangeably and mixed up by the food producers and grocery stores but I think they are both fine (someone correct me if I'm wrong). I don't buy them because I'm personally allergic, but Elke has has sweet potato treats before and really likes them. I am not sure about how they are on the tummy, someone else will have to chime in.

She also loves carrots, but again I don't know if they have an effect on the digestion. I have not tried other squash.
 

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I'm thinking canned yams have a lot of sugar--is that a problem.

Pumpkin straight from the can is just pumpkin--I would think that however you serve yams or sweet potatoes you would have to make sure that all the dog is getting is the potato. Maybe cook them yourself or serve them raw??

This comment is probably pretty obvious--sorry :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
i guess I wondered if the sweet potato/or yams had same property's for firming dogs poo as the pumpkin....as well as other squashes, or should it just be pumpkin as a 'firming agent" :*)
I wouldn't want to give my boy anything I shouldn't!
 

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Clarification: I didn't mean you should have already known the answer I gave when I said it was obvious--I meant that perhaps I was sharing this great wonderful tip, bragging about my knowledge sorta, but everyone already knew it.
 

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Botany lesson: Yams and sweet potatoes are not the same thing. Sweet potatoes are indigenous to the Americas, and are what you buy in the grocery stores inthe US, even if the are labeled yams. True yams are indigenous to Africa, Inda and SE Asia. Many varieties of true yams are actually inedible, but are used in making drugs such as cortizone. Sweet potatoes and true yams belong to different botanical families. Pumpkins are members of the gourd family.


Just so I don't come across as a know-it-all, a goodly chunk of the above information came from the set of World Book Encyclopedias that are sitting on my dining room table. :)
 

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What you are after is fiber.

Pumpkins, most kinds of edible winter squash, sweet potatoes/yams will all work. It would be better to give without sugar, iow, buy and microwave or buy unsweetened canned varieties, however, you can give canned sweetened pumpkin pie filling or sweet potatoes/yams as they will also work. The sugar won't hurt them as long as they don't have a medical condition forbiding or limiting sugars.

Thinking about it, I would bet canned pinto beans or home cooked pintos would work well, too. You would probably have to mash them up, but they would firm up a stool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
aha... LindaH & Rosemary..info I was looking for. I knew the yams & sweet potato's are different...they taste different (I like yams most) But I was wondering on the property that was the "help"...thank you so much!!!
 

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aha... LindaH & Rosemary..info I was looking for. I knew the yams & sweet potato's are different...they taste different (I like yams most) But I was wondering on the property that was the "help"...thank you so much!!!
Unless you have an ethnic market that imports them in your neighborhood, you probably don't get true yams, because they don't grow well in the US. Canned and fresh "yams" in the grocery store are actually sweet potatoes. But yes, the property in sweet potatoes and pumpkin that helps keep stools consistant is fiber. Beans also have fiber, so using them would probably work too, just try to find lower sodium varieties.
 

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Not to hijack the thread, but is the canned pumpkin labelled "100% Pure Pumpkin" generally alright? I know the Libby's stuff is available in most grocery stores. Is that a product I/we should stay away from? Thanks in advance!
 

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kopfgeschlagen
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Not to hijack the thread, but is the canned pumpkin labelled "100% Pure Pumpkin" generally alright? I know the Libby's stuff is available in most grocery stores. Is that a product I/we should stay away from? Thanks in advance!
That's what I buy. The 100% pumpkin is preferable, but you can also use the sweetened pumpkin pie filling if necessary, as stated above.
 

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Not to hijack the thread, but is the canned pumpkin labelled "100% Pure Pumpkin" generally alright? I know the Libby's stuff is available in most grocery stores. Is that a product I/we should stay away from? Thanks in advance!
That's the stuff you want. What you don't want is "pumpkin pie filling". The pie filling has sugar and spices added to it.
 

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Ameteur Houdini
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Er, portion sizes, I see you guys feed about a tablespoon of pumpkin with each meal. You are feeding doberman size meals! For my Dachshund though, she has 2/3 cups of dry food each day (fed morning and night). Should I feed her smaller than a *teaspoon* of pumpkin, which is what I'm doing now? I'm just worried about giving her too much. She loves it, so I could feed it to her on a spoon if I wanted!
 

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Sorry, I don't know the serving amount, just the botany. I think someone mentioned giving their Dobe 2 tablespoons. Maybe for a Doxie, start with half a teaspoon, and adjust up or down as you go along? I would probably freeze most of the can in a few smaller portions, and defrost them as needed, rather than letting the can just sit in the fridge until it was gone.
 

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I definitely have it all in plastic containers, some frozen, some not. Thanks for all the botany information, by the way. It is fascinating.
 

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Why are you feeding these foods? Is your dog having problems? I feed raw and since switching to that diet 5 years ago, have never needed to use pumpkin.
 

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Pumpkin is high in soluble fiber and can help with both diarrhea and constipation. Soluble fiber slows digestion and draws water in to stool which can bulk up stool and make it firmer which is beneficial when you are dealing with loose stool. Also, by drawing water in to stool it can soften hard stool and help with constipation. Sweet potatoes and yams are a good source of soluble fiber as well.

Insoluble fiber speeds up digestion so if you have a dog or cat prone to constipation you'd want to use a little of both soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber to draw water in to the stool and help keep it softer, and insoluble since it moves things through quicker. But if you use too much insoluble fiber it can actually cause loose stool as it will move food through their system pretty quickly.

I make my cats raw diet and I use plain canned pumpkin as the fiber source. I use 1 TBSP per pound of meat. I also give a spoonful of plain canned pumpkin to the dogs a few times a week since they go gaga over it.
 
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