Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

I have been "watching from the shadows" for quite some time on DT and I believe the group here could help me with my questions. I have never owned a dog before. Many people have said online that I should "avoid" the Doberman breed because of this. I really don't think I could see myself owning a different dog. I look for the loyal loving goofball many of you DT'ers talk about in your lives on a daily basis. I own a few training books, manuals, bibles etc. about dogs, and I will end up buying much more before I eventually make that choice in actually purchasing a dog. I am wondering if you guys think it is possible for me to own a Doberman as a first dog breed. I want to look out for whats best for me, and the dog as well. Some questions I am looking to have answered if people think it would be okay would be:

DoberBoy or DoberGirl?
European or American?
Adopt or purchase from a reputable breeder, not some BYB?

Any other advise would be greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,193 Posts
I think as long as you have researched and know what you are getting into then you should be fine. I have a male and he is wonderful..he is my first dobe so I can't compare. I got Zac from a breeder and thought that it was a good choice for my first doberdog. If you get a rescue make sure it is a good one who will be willing to help you and a reputable breeder will be willing to help you with questions along with everyone here! They are a great breed! :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
If you really want a doberman and it is your first dog, I would adopt an older dog from a reputable rescue. By older, I'm thinking 5 years old or older. Reason being - They are settled. By adopting from a rescue, they will be able to steer you in the right direction on which dog would be a better fit for you and your lifestyle.

Good luck in your search!
 

·
Eat Poo and Die
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
I think that going with a reputable breeder who has the time to advise you and hopefully work with you would be a great route if possible. Also nice would be an older rescue that has hopefully gone through their doberteens. As long as you're in it for the long haul, I don't see why having a Doberman as a starter dog is a bad thing. My starter dog was an 8 month old, untrained, and MAJORLY leash reactive, unsocialized boy from a shelter that we adopted because he looked so pitiful starving in the shelter. My SO had not had a dog for nearly ten years, and his previous dog was a super friendly Golden. In the beginning, people told me to return my dog to the shelter as he deserved a better home. Now, I think that we're a pretty decent home for him, and I've quickly learned to be a decent pet owner. He's gotten his CGC, went from trying to attack other dogs from a block away to being able to walk right by them on the street whilst controlling himself with a solid leave-it. He's in agility classes, and is an absolute star pupil--he's never the dog in trouble.

At least you're doing your research before bringing the dog home! :goodidea:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
There are a lot more factors to look at here. Did you have dogs in the home when you were a child/teenager? Have you dog sat for friends and family? Are you familiar with all the different dog training methods? Are you planning on enrolling your dog in training classes (more than just puppy kindergarten)? If most of these answers are "yes", then I think raising a Doberman could be a definite possibility. My husband and I will be first time Doberman owners soon (hopefully), and this will technically be our "first dog" together. However we both grew up in med/large breed households, we have dog sat for many of our friends dogs (Aussies, GSD's, Boxers...), because they trust us the most with them. I also work at a dog boarding facility, so I have experience with just about every breed known to man, and I am very comfortable reading dog body language. I think having a Dobe as our first dog is going to go wonderfully, and I'm not even interested in any other breeds.
So I think it depends on your overall life experience with dogs.
Do lots and lots and lots of research, and see how you feel about it then.
 

·
Paralibrarian
Joined
·
6,168 Posts
It's funny, I in fact had no idea that the Doberman isn't for a first time owner. Elka is my first dog, and my first Doberman.

As a result, I'm a member of Doberman Talk and 3 other Doberman forums. I've read 100 or so books on dogs, dog behavior, and dog training. I've occasionally had to work like heck with Elka, because she was so good at some things immediately, that I slacked off on others. She's a smart, smart dog, and that can "get her in trouble" sometimes. When she's bored, she's bored like a little kid. When she needs to get rid of energy, she's high strung and "acts bad", if you don't know what's going on. Has it been easy? No. Do I regret it? Not really.

But, if you aren't prepared to put in the work, or find a trainer, and find your dog a job, then maybe the Doberman isn't a good first dog for you. Or, adopt an adult, as many have suggested. That way, you get to skip over the (extremely frustrating at times) puppy-young adult spasticity and just good clean Doberman quality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the advice everyone!!!!

Do you all think it would matter if I went either with a boy or girl, or an American or European line?

I know the whole American or European debate can get pretty heated on here, not trying to start an argument.

Also I have heard that boys act differently than girls. Don't know if it is true or not, please correct me if I am wrong.

Thanks Again!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Also, My girlfriend of forever has grown up with many different dogs over her life and I dog sit for their family often. So, I would not say were the most experienced, but we by far are not the least.
 

·
sufferin succotash
Joined
·
9,168 Posts
Welcome to DT :)

Before even considering a boy, girl, Euro, American, I would consider these questions:

-What club will you train at? (puppy kindergarten, obedience training)
-Does your schedule allow sufficient time for physical/mental exercise everyday?
-How will you socialize your dog?
-what training method will you use?


Some questions I am looking to have answered if people think it would be okay would be:

DoberBoy or DoberGirl?
European or American?
Adopt or purchase from a reputable breeder, not some BYB?

Any other advise would be greatly appreciated.
 

·
u mad?
Joined
·
6,476 Posts
GREAT responses have been made here, please keep them in mind.

Dreizehn is my first dog and my first doberman. There are many breeds that probably wqould be much easier but I LOVE him and do not regret it. I have, however, put in a lot of time with training and plenty of money (training, a good breeder, etc) to make it go as smoothly as possible. An older rescue is a GREAT idea. However, if you really want a puppy make sure that you go with a reputable breeder who is going to be there for you for the life of the puppy. I can't stress the importance of this enough. Yes, a puppy from a reputable, ethical breeder will cost more initially but it will work out in the long run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Welcome to DT :)

Before even considering a boy, girl, Euro, American, I would consider these questions:

-What club will you train at? (puppy kindergarten, obedience training)
-Does your schedule allow sufficient time for physical/mental exercise everyday?
-How will you socialize your dog?
-what training method will you use?

I would need to talk to some people on the forum about these topics as well. I would probably go to at least two obedience classes and use the clicker exercises. I know there are many different things that go along with owning this breed besides just buying it, and that it is a high intensive breed. I am not in that stage yet where I am going to purchase a dog soon, I just want to know the general information on differences so I can progress and know what I am looking for when I decide to make that decision.

Thanks again for the post!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Yes, a puppy from a reputable, ethical breeder will cost more initially but it will work out in the long run.
If I decide to go that route, I would be willing to pay anything for a good reliable dog from a healthy line, and cost would not affect my decision in the least bit.
 

·
Living la Vida Loca!
Joined
·
2,580 Posts
Coco is my first dobe. We had a few mixes when I was a kid but I was not the primary caregiver. It is a lot of work and I have learned a lot along the way. Made some mistakes but we have both survived!! I went to petsmart puppy class for 8 weeks which turned out to be the best experience and time of my life for Coco and I to bond and for me to learn what the hell I was supposed to do as an owner. I did a lot of research and joined this wonderful forum. It can be a little rocky at times when they are younger but it is so worth it and rewarding!! Good luck!! :butfly:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,437 Posts
When you find a breeder, let them choose the right puppy for you based on their experience with the litter. It might be a male or a female that is the best pup for a first time owner and your breeder should be able to recognize that. I think for the most part it is a matter of preference.

Just be aware that if you were to get a male Doberman they are prone to male-male aggression so any other dog you bring into your home should be a female.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,279 Posts
Hello Barkz! I'm new here too.

Elza is our first time DOG literaly!

Living with a dog was our dream so we studied a lot as you do.
We researched many breeders nationwide and luckily found a reputable breeder.
We repeatedly emphasized that we're the first time dog owner, looking for a good temperate and people friendly as here's the residential area. A sociable dobe is a must.
We talked a lot over the phone and decided.
Because we didn't choose Elza from the puppies, the breeder!

Then Elza traveled alone by plane.
I'm 100% satisfied with Elza so to my breeder!

Finding the good breeder is essential! Ask the breeder many questions including the pup's parent/grandparent dogs. If the breeder is confident and professional, he/she will be happy to give you a lot more info.

Good luck!!
 

·
Kano's personal couch
Joined
·
275 Posts
I didn't read all the comments so if it's been said, ignore me. :)

I would recommend finding a local Doberman rescue and maybe fostering a dobie to make SURE it's the right breed for you. The reason people say they aren't for first time dog owners (most of the time) is because they're a high energy, drivey, intelligent, working breed. This is something that's hard to understand until you actually have one running laps around your house at 6am. Fostering a dobie might give you an idea of what people mean when they say that.

I think either a rescue or a young pup from a good breeder is fine...either will give you life long support if they're reputable, and male vs female is 6 in one half a dozen in the other in my opinion. I've heard the bitches are more stubborn/tricky/devious lol. I'll say Kano sure is, but I don't know if she's the norm, haha.

Kano is not my first dog, but she IS my first doberman. I'll say that not all the reading in the world can prepare you for the life-changing whirlwind that may enter your home should you choose to get one. I had a Springer Spaniel growing up, so I already knew ALL ABOUT high energy, and my mutt is still one of the smartest dogs I've yet to meet, so I was prepared for the intelligence. Even so, Kano came in and turned my world upside down lol. Those of us here wouldn't have it any other way, but not everyone wants what we have, even though sometimes they think they do.

Just food for thought :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
so I would just ask a breeder which dog they believed was right for me? sounds easy enough, now I don't have to make a tough decision lol...So which line would be right for a first time Doberowner? and if I choose to adopt, which most of you are saying, would the line be known or even at that point matter?

Thanks again all for all the feedback and advice everyone. You guys make this process a lot less stressful for people like me when I know there are a bunch of knowledgeable people there to help and guide me along the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
I think it is totally do-able. The most important thing is be honest with yourself about the dog you want. By that I mean get a dog that compliments your ability to train and your working ability. If you are wanting a couch potato who knows a couple party tricks, or if you want a bite sport prospect, it doesn't matter. Just be honest with yourself and the breeder you choose. Their is a VERY wide range of drive/temperment/ect within this breed, do you homework on breeders and I am sure you will find one hwo can match you up to the perfect dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Yes, if you buy from a reputable breeder, they will be able to choose a puppy that fits you best. As for American vs. Euro, it just depends on what you like. I very much prefer the look of Dobes from American lines. Some people prefer Euro. Look at picture threads on here to decide what look you like best. Whichever you pick, go with show lines, not working lines. You don't want a high drive Dobe as your first dog. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
so I would just ask a breeder which dog they believed was right for me? sounds easy enough, now I don't have to make a tough decision lol...So which line would be right for a first time Doberowner? and if I choose to adopt, which most of you are saying, would the line be known or even at that point matter?

Thanks again all for all the feedback and advice everyone. You guys make this process a lot less stressful for people like me when I know there are a bunch of knowledgeable people there to help and guide me along the way.
If you are going to go with a breeder find one who produces dogs you like, I'm guessing dog sports are not in your future plans so most any reputable show breeder would be able to set you up with a dog to your liking. Any reputable breeder(working or show) should know their lines and individual dogs enough to be able to make a match up to your needs. If they don't think they are producing a dog that would fit your lifestyle the will honestly express that. They are best at setting you up with a puppy, as they have spent the first 8-12 weeks with the dogs and know them on an individual basis.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Barkz
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top