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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend of mine was asking a few questions to me about why I am
Going thru the process of getting a puppy. He couldn't get his head round
Why I'm paying this amount for a puppy & quite bluntly said it can't matter
About breeding temperament etc because it's all about how you train your dog
To weather it has a good temperament or bad.
I couldn't get my point across what so ever and I got so frustrated!

Was just wondering what the best way of explaining the way temperament is
Important. I know that it's important obviously lol :) The way he was saying about its all in the training not the breeding really thru me off because I was getting frustrated! So I thought I'd rant and ask here!

:confused:
 

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A simple way for me to describe genetics is using some kind of herding or hunting dog. I can take my Vizsla and put it in a field and it should hunt and find birds. That's all genetics. It's pretty easy for people to "see" or picture that. Temperament is also based on genetics. Puppies are not a blank slate. They have a set of genetics that can determine temperament and there are some things that CANNOT be fixed.

Why do most Dobes behave similarly? As most BCs? And most Vizslas? And most rotties, etc.? Genetics.
 

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I always use the Marley & Me movie as an example. I asked if they watched it and explain to them the reason why they couldn't even get a trainer to help them is because his temperament was bred into him by the father of Marley. In the book and movie they described the dog to almost wild.
 

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I would also like to point out, in addition to temperament having genetic components, that the first 7-9 weeks of life are CRUCIAL in how a dog will behave, later in life. They learn a lot from both the environment they are raised in, the people who are around them, and also from their mother. If the mother of the pups has a bad temperament, the pups will see this at a very sensitive age, and most likely display similar behavior in the future (such as fear, reactivity, and aggression). This is called maternal learning and has been documented in several different studies with both balanced mothers all the way to aggressive mothers.

Also you could look up the studies done on "anxious Pointer dogs" essentially they breed the most fearful dogs to each other and the most confident dogs to each other and then raised them all the same and noted many, significant, behavioral differences. For one, the dogs who were of the anxious group were incredibly fearful of people and novel stimuli, and had a higher chance of deafness, even.

Also, on the note of critical periods that take place while the pup is at the breeders, If the pup isnt properly handled and exposed to novel stimuli in the right way, then this could really hinder their future development as adult dogs. That is another reason it is important to find a really good breeder.
 

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I always use the Marley & Me movie as an example. I asked if they watched it and explain to them the reason why they couldn't even get a trainer to help them is because his temperament was bred into him by the father of Marley. In the book and movie they described the dog to almost wild.
That's a really good and simple example, I'll have to remember that one the next time someone asks me about breeders and temperament.
 

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Its similar with horses.
I am blessed to live with Dobermans & horses.

My Quarterhorse is extremly well bred.
Scotch Bay Time (Scotch Bar Time) for any other horse Moms here.
His breeding and genetics contribute a significant amount to his potential, mindset and trainability. Those were key factors in choosing him as a young horse.

Of course, I never tell anyone how much I pay for a horse (especially my husband). :)
 

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Training's very important, but so are genetics. If you have a dog whose parents are genetic nightmares, guess what the puppies will inherit?

I usually do the border collie/ herding, and Lab/ retrieving example when people ask about training vs. genetic temperament, but I'll remember to use Marley and Me the next time. I get a lot of questions when I talk about finding my SAR dog puppy in a few years, and why I'm having a look at breeders now, instead of just buying a dog out of the newspaper when I'm ready.

A good breeder who health tests and breeds sound, confident Dobermans will have the best puppies. It's worth the extra money. You can always take your cash to a BYB breeder for a cheaper dog, but if you wind up with temperament or health problems from poor breeding, you'll be spending hundreds or thousands more in the end. For those of us who want solid, healthy pets and working dogs, a good breeder is the best answer. For me, it's the only answer.

And don't overlook rescues too- there's plenty of good, well-bred dogs there that get dumped for some reason. Anything from 'we're moving' to 'having a baby' to 'the dog didn't match our new furniture.' I really wish I was kidding on the last reason, but it happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ahh perfect! Thank you!
I think its similar with alot of things,
He did say he would only ever buy a purebred. But this is where we argued a bit,
As i said how do you know about it being purebred etc if ur not willing to research.
Pay and wait for the right dog. He said i was going into great depth just for a dog.
So that how we started lol.

Cheers for the info!
:D
 

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Ask if he knows anything about the history of European royalty.
 
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