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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I have started to work sit stay with my puppy. He has been doing well but likes to slide backwards intentionally. What would be the best way to correct this? He doesnt slide into a down, just straight backwards. Right now I am moving him forward to the orignal spot that he sat at as a "correction". I was wondering if anyone had done something different (better) in the past with good results before I continued this way.

Thank you,
Kayla
 

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I have been working with a puppy who when doing fronts will come sit right in front of me, but when not released soon enough he would slide back very quickly up to 6' away from the 'front position' and still remain sitting. His was due to excitement, and did not happen if I did not 'watch him'.

The way I curbed this was going back to having him sit with a wall behind him. He would never deviate from the sit position any other direction other than to shoot backwards, so I stayed on the wall, reinforced, reinforced for staying in position while he could not go backwards.

I might try making him 'sit stay' with a wall behind his bum and reinforce more for sitting. If he stays in a sit position for half a second, give a treat, next if he stays in position for 1 second, give a treat, and continue rewarding while he stays in position without backing up.

The problem is probably due to 'too much too soon' as he does not understand to stay in place, he only understands "stay sitting". Start back and reward much sooner, before he gets the chance to start backing up.

Do not even let him be in the position to back up as this can cause a bad habit. Start back from the basics, and only ask for small amounts at a time until perfect.
 

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I have been working with a puppy who when doing fronts will come sit right in front of me, but when not released soon enough he would slide back very quickly up to 6' away from the 'front position' and still remain sitting. His was due to excitement, and did not happen if I did not 'watch him'.

The way I curbed this was going back to having him sit with a wall behind him. He would never deviate from the sit position any other direction other than to shoot backwards, so I stayed on the wall, reinforced, reinforced for staying in position while he could not go backwards.

I might try making him 'sit stay' with a wall behind his bum and reinforce more for sitting. If he stays in a sit position for half a second, give a treat, next if he stays in position for 1 second, give a treat, and continue rewarding while he stays in position without backing up.

The problem is probably due to 'too much too soon' as he does not understand to stay in place, he only understands "stay sitting". Start back and reward much sooner, before he gets the chance to start backing up.

Do not even let him be in the position to back up as this can cause a bad habit. Start back from the basics, and only ask for small amounts at a time until perfect.
I was going to suggest this, have him sit against a wall!
 

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Is this puppy really only 12 weeks?

Remember he has the attention span of a gnat at this age.... I'd do stays no longer than about 20-30 seconds, use a wall or cabinet, etc. and stay in front of him "nose to knees".

I actually do not do stays at this young age.
 

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I have a 14 week old and we incorporated 'stay' as a part of either sit or down. She's not to move from the position until I say "release!". It makes it far more simple than separating the commands.

I agree with ellenm, though. They just don't have the attention span at this point. The longest I have made her wait is around 30 seconds, and I only walked about 10-12' away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all,

Yes he is young. However he is good at sit, down, and "here" (I do not want to teach a formal obedience come yet, I use "here" as an informal "get by me" sort of command). I wanted to continue to challenge him and keep him interested in training.

Longshot4me - I am trying the same tactic. I am teaching him that if I tell you to sit (or down) you do not move until I tell you otherwise. I do not expect him to last more than seconds at this point. I was looking for input on how to nip this backing up in the bud before I let him learn that it was ok.

I appreciate all the input!
 

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I have a 14 week old and we incorporated 'stay' as a part of either sit or down. She's not to move from the position until I say "release!". It makes it far more simple than separating the commands.

I agree with ellenm, though. They just don't have the attention span at this point. The longest I have made her wait is around 30 seconds, and I only walked about 10-12' away.
^^^^ same here.

I teach SIT first and then SIT/STAY is built in...once we have it, then I teach DOWN, followed by DOWN/STAY.
- so technically, I am teaching 1 thing or 1 task word, at a time
My release move is OK, followed by "gegege" praise.
^^^^ after this sinks in, I work on the COME command...and I always use my dogs name, in a 2 word command...like AMY SIT or AMY STAY or AMY DOWN or AMY COME...keeping everything simple, and learning one thing well, before moving on to much.
 

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Thanks all,

Yes he is young. However he is good at sit, down, and "here" (I do not want to teach a formal obedience come yet, I use "here" as an informal "get by me" sort of command). I wanted to continue to challenge him and keep him interested in training.

Longshot4me - I am trying the same tactic. I am teaching him that if I tell you to sit (or down) you do not move until I tell you otherwise. I do not expect him to last more than seconds at this point. I was looking for input on how to nip this backing up in the bud before I let him learn that it was ok.

I appreciate all the input!
Not sure what your plans are with him, but at this age, I would be doing mostly play and drive building work. The most important thing is to build the relationship with the dog. Look up some puppy drive building exercises. It is good for both the relationship with you and the dog as well as his brain. Along with that it helps reinforce the idea of 'training is fun and exciting!'

The one thing I wish I didn't do was teach my boy so many commands so quickly. We missed out on the foundation and now am struggling to rebuild it. There is a German Shepherd of a similar age in my training group now, and is expected very little. His work revolves around becoming familiar with the training environment, familiar with walking on a leash, and most importantly listening to the owner. The dog knows basic 'sit' and 'down' and that he's supposed to stay to the left side, but they mainly work on building focus and drive.

Might be something to look into instead of simply more commands etc
 
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