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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have any experience with raising two sisters from the same litter? Pro's Con's. Sibbling rivalry, that sort of thing?

 

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This was discussed in another thread recently. I as a breeder will not sell siblings together, nor would I ever keep siblings. I think you miss out on a very important developmental phase by keeping siblings together. Once they are old enough to leave the litter they really need to finish growing up into adulthood with their own identity and bond with people and adult dogs. There is nothing wrong with having fun playdates with other puppies, but I don't think they should be living together. It's much more difficult to form a strong bond and obedient puppy when you have two chewing on each other. Two puppies equal a LOT more than twice the trouble.
 

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I have to agree with Julie.

I recently brough home two sisters. Though, I needed the both of them, and one is hubbys, it's been total kaos. The bonding IS effected. The girls seem to only want to play with each other, and don't come over to people for any type of contact. It really makes them what I call "Doggy".

We have since been seperating them. Meals seperate, outside time alone, crated seperatly. We don't let them play much together. It really sucks to have a dog segragated home. It's simplly a pain in the ass. Training, is also harder. As you have to seek a place to train away from the sibling. Though this would be the case also if you have multiple dogs anyway.

The pro's I can see to this would be few. But in my case, my husband and I get to compete for fun with our new dogs, and do alot together involving them. He trains his, and I train mine. Together we are going to puppy classes. My husband wants to do search and rescue and later on cadaver work with his. I want to explore bite work with mine and if not, then obedieance.

After a tramatic stroke that left my face paralised and disfigured at 26 years old, I had hid in my house for 3 years only leaving for short times while waring sunglasses. As a effect of this I gained too much weight, my health was compermised. My doctor asked me what I would like to do as a hobby to get me out and exersicing. I said a new puppy! So this is where I hope to restart some of my life. My husband was bound to do this with me, for me... So a breeder who sold me the two litter mates was a great save in my life.

I think it can be done with LOTS of work and comitment. Anything can happen if you want it bad enough. I also do not work at all right now, and have the time. My husband makes good money so we also have the funds for two at a time. I would think everything through.
 

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I want to explore bite work with mine and if not, then obedieance.
I know my response is off-topic to the original post, but I thought it was important to mention. "Bite work" is not a discipline in and of itself to teach a dog. Bite work is just one part of a much larger and more involved discipline where obedience training is PARAMOUNT. It's not one or the other.
 

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Yup, as Schuzthund is 80% obedience. But I mean as pursing it at all, or just going for just Obedience. Does that make sence? I Will be talking to a few trainers and see what they think, and what I am up for.
 

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You've now heard this from several people--getting and raising two puppies of similar ages together is NOT a good idea. It doesn't make any difference whether they are siblings or puppies from different litters that are close in age--it doesn't even really make any difference if they are the same breed.

Without going to extremes in keeping them segregated you will end up with puppies bonded more to each other than to the people in their lives. You'll short change both of them when it comes to attention and training. Two puppies are much, much more than twice the work of one puppy and two puppies can think up much more stuff to get into trouble with than a single puppy.

I've had multiple dogs most of the time that I've owned dogs but I keep a minimum split in ages of two years. Right now I've got a nearly 9 year old dog, a nearly 4 year old dog and a 16 month old dog. I raised a puppy for a breeder friend who is now nearly 6 and who was in the gap between the 9 and 4 year olds of mine. But all of these dogs, as puppies had ample time spent on them and only on them.

All of my dogs have come from the same breeder and I often baby sit puppies for her and have raised a few until they are six month while she was making a final decision about which dog she would keep--she does not let two puppies the same age (same litter) grow up together--she farms them out to people like me so that they do get the concentrated attention that a puppy should get--and they have the advantage of learning behavior from my older dogs.

I can't think of any particular advantages to getting two puppies at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Let me back up a bit here and define what I am talking about. This is not a situation where we are bringing in two 10-12 week olds. These girls will be over 6 months old and will be ready to take their CD. We took them both to the park on Saturday and they both handled the same whether my wife and I were walking them side by side or if we were on other ends of the park. While laying on their bed chewing bones they would come most of the time when called and would randomly get up and come seek attention. So I really did not get a feel for any of the problems Mandy has encountered.

Don't get me wrong, I realize at 6+ months they are still pups, but I would think that there is a distinct difference starting at this point verses starting at say 10 weeks of age.
 

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Let me back up a bit here and define what I am talking about. This is not a situation where we are bringing in two 10-12 week olds. These girls will be over 6 months old and will be ready to take their CD. We took them both to the park on Saturday and they both handled the same whether my wife and I were walking them side by side or if we were on other ends of the park. While laying on their bed chewing bones they would come most of the time when called and would randomly get up and come seek attention. So I really did not get a feel for any of the problems Mandy has encountered.

Don't get me wrong, I realize at 6+ months they are still pups, but I would think that there is a distinct difference starting at this point verses starting at say 10 weeks of age.
There's an increased risk of fighting when littermates live together, far more likely than with two non related dogs. With same sex littermates, that risk becomes even higher.
 

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There's an increased risk of fighting when littermates live together, far more likely than with two non related dogs. With same sex littermates, that risk becomes even higher.
I wonder why it is that way with littermates. I have heard of this happening. Even if they seem fine for years. All of a sudden, they can start fighting. Is it because they are siblings or is it because they are the same age and gender?
 

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Very true. There is definitely a greater risk of aggression with two littermates raised together. And at 6 months it's too early to see it in a lot of cases.
 

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I wonder why it is that way with littermates. I have heard of this happening. Even if they seem fine for years. All of a sudden, they can start fighting. Is it because they are siblings or is it because they are the same age and gender?
I think it probably has something to do with pack instinct, but that's just my best guess. I've definitely seen it to be true in more than one situation.
 

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We kept 2 sisters from our first litter. Living with Dionne and Henna was like a tornado flying through the house. They spent the whole day just blowing me off. Rough housing, play fighting, running, playing, tables getting overturned, lamps flying ... They didn't give a darn about anything I was saying - they were far too wrapped up in each other to even hear me. They were adorable when they were asleep and all curled up into each other, and holy terrors while they were awake. Eventually, both were spayed and placed into other homes (didn't turn out the way we had hoped conformationally), Dionne when she was about 16 months old and Henna when she was 3.

We then kept a brother / sister from our second litter. That went better. I'm still not saying it was easy but it was definitely better. For whatever reason, they just weren't as wrapped up in each other. As I mentioned in another thread a minute ago, we lost Wonder last summer to lymphoma. Now Wish has osteosarcoma.

I have 2 sisters from my third litter who will be 8 in May. However, they weren't raised together. Rory went to the stud dog owner at about 10 weeks of age and lived there for 2 years. I raised Karma. Rory came back when she was 2 to be shown in the area and to get her health testing done here where it is more readily available. The owner was ill at the time and ended up asking if Rory could stay, and she did. They don't exhibit any of the sister stuff that Henna and Dee did.

I have another brother / sister combo, but the male is from our 5th litter and is 2 years older than the female who is from our 7th litter 2 years later. So, obviously there is none of the sibling rivalry going on with them.
 

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I think it really depends on the dogs and their personalities.

I have two maltese sisters from the same litter. They were the only pups in the litter in fact. They do have a bond with each other and love each other but they also love being away from each other and bonding with us. Most of the time they don't care whether they are together or not. But I believe that has to do with their personalities. They both have strong independent personalities.
It wasn't all fun and games though. When we first got them, they were together alot and they were twin terrors. And they were rather attached to each other and didn't like being separated from each other. But I realized that we were treating them as a pair and not as individual dogs. Once we started treating them like individuals things changed. Now they are fine whether they are together or apart.
But it doesn't always work out this way. I have a friend who got two lab puppies from the same litter. They ended up bonding strong with each other and hated to be separated and never really bonded with their owners. This happens alot.

So it can go either way. But it is a lot of hard work having two pups from the same litter so make sure you are fully capable of handling the challenge before you think about getting two pups from the same litter. Make sure you pay close attention to their personalities and how they interact with each other and with you. It is a risk to take only if you are willing and capable of taking it.
 

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You know I was just braking up a fight between my two boys who are only 18 months apart. My grandmother always told me that when Children are close in age they will be more apt to spar. Of course with children there are alot more Pro's to growing up close in age I think. But this is one of the cons for sure. The constant bickering!!! ~cries~

I just thought it was funny that the same was true for humane sibblings. Has anyone seen the same with thier kids?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
But I realized that we were treating them as a pair and not as individual dogs. Once we started treating them like individuals things changed.
Trixie thank you for your reply. There is a lot of insight there. I had not really given it much thought as in treating them as individuals. My thoughts were more along the "the girls" line. We took them to the park and traded them back and forth, walked together and walked seperate. One is definately more beta than the other and seems to accept that at this early point, but I realize that can change.

Thanks again, if we do this your experience might give us a leg up.
 

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Let me back up a bit here and define what I am talking about. This is not a situation where we are bringing in two 10-12 week olds. These girls will be over 6 months old and will be ready to take their CD. We took them both to the park on Saturday and they both handled the same whether my wife and I were walking them side by side or if we were on other ends of the park. While laying on their bed chewing bones they would come most of the time when called and would randomly get up and come seek attention. So I really did not get a feel for any of the problems Mandy has encountered.

Don't get me wrong, I realize at 6+ months they are still pups, but I would think that there is a distinct difference starting at this point verses starting at say 10 weeks of age.
I am confused - don't you already have a young female pup? Would this make three? What is the situation in which you would be taking these two - why are they being rehomed, and why together?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I am confused - don't you already have a young female pup? Would this make three? What is the situation in which you would be taking these two - why are they being rehomed, and why together?

No we do not have the first pup home yet, the second pup is the litter mate, making just two. They will be preteens at just over six months if we get both. One is a definate. Our previous Dobes crossed the Rainbow Bridge six and four years ago.:emo10:
 
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