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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where did you trainer go to school? After i finish my Schooling for being a basic obedience dog trainer I want to specialize in Shutzhund and maybe agility later I think I know where I would like to do my schooling but im curious as to where you and or your trainer(s) went and what you thought about there teaching methods and how they felt about there schooling if you know.
 

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As far as I know my agility trainers have no formal training. They all went to college for one thing or another. One was an engineer of some sort. They all have been training and competing for a long, long time. I know they attend seminars and such.

Not sure how the shutzhund world works.
 

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All my trainers learned by experience. I am not sure if there is a school for SchH training. Helpers learn from other helpers, handlers learn from other handlers or by training their own dogs and going to seminars. The only one that comes to mind is Ivan B. He may do some kind of a school thing, but I am not sure.
 

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It would be called the school of experience. I know one can take courses for basic pet training and have some people actually pay you for that service BUT...you will NEVER find someone willing to pay you for agility or IPO training if you don't actually have advanced titles in either sport. And don't forget a very real presence in those sports. Sorry but you are getting way ahead(think years) of yourself. :)
 

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All my trainers learned by experience. I am not sure if there is a school for SchH training. Helpers learn from other helpers, handlers learn from other handlers or by training their own dogs and going to seminars. The only one that comes to mind is Ivan B. He may do some kind of a school thing, but I am not sure.
This. We have s young fellow training under Armin at my club..

Tperkins is "studying" to be a helper. Maybe talk to him.

What do you want to specialize in? Like actually being a helper? I'd love to do that but I'm so tiny and you run into all sorts of dogs if you're at a "general" (no breed base) club.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have found quite a few schools that teach you to do it one is not far from me and I didnt want people to pay me to teach there dogs I want to start a kennel when I am older and get on my feet in the next 10 years or so
 

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The good trainers have experience. You have had to train many dogs and your own. With ScH. usually people begin by titling their dog. I titled one dog with a ScH I, certainly doesn't make me capable of teaching others! The trainers I most admire have been doing it for years and have an understanding of dogs and dog body language that is phenomenal.
 

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Everyone hit the nail on the head. Working dogs in protection is an art that is learned primarily through hands on experience through a mentor. I read lots of stuff and watch videos from many different trainers using different schools of thought. One thing I have come to realize is when reading techniques and methods they make perfect sense. The problem is making them make perfect sense to the dog your working with. The person I am working with was mentored through an older gentleman in a prior club that has sense dis-banded. Though he still stays up to date on all things dog, not only in bite sports but in all realms of dog sports. He tells me dog training is an ever evolving thing and to think you don't need to gain more experience is Novice and arrogant. (this is not directed at anyone just something he told me)

The next thing is to be one of the greats in working dogs in protection sports, you need to see things from both sides of the sleeve. You need to understand what is happening or needs to happen from the helpers point of view as well as the handlers point of view.

You have to realize the different types of helpers, you have trial helpers, you have training helpers, you have helpers who can be both, and you have helpers who can train other helpers. At this point my main focus is as a training helper, due to the fact me and my mentor are the only ones working dogs at this point and my goal is getting our club off the ground. Though he does point out the differences in my actions if I were to have done that exercise at a trial.

Another thing is that an inexperience helper can hurt a dog both physically and mentally. I did most of my stuff initially on a retired SchI GSD. She actually taught me how to be a helper in the beginning. She knew what was expected of her, and did exactly that. I now am working with dogs who have had a fair amount of training already. I do have one dog I have been allowed to start from the beginning with and it is such a joy. My mentor will not allow me to work with a dog who has any issues that need to be worked out, at this point he is at my side telling me what I need to do. He gives me the direction i need to go, and tells me why I am doing whatever i am doing. Point being people will often be very reluctant to let a novice helper work their dogs.


I'm not sure what type of schooling your going to for dog training but I have to ask how much of it is hands on with a dog. Books and videos are great tools but far from coming close to working with dogs. Even working with ones own dog is nothing close to being enough. I learned this when I started working with the dogs in rescue, boy did I have alot to learn about motivating dogs of different temperments and drives. Club dogs are easy to work with they want to work.

You need to find a club to work with. You might start off with an obedience club to gain experience working with dogs of different breeds/drives/temperment. I can honestly say you its not a common occurence for an experienced protection trainer to ask you to come train with them.

I was very fortunate that i hooked up with my mentor through his obedience classes, and from their forged a solid relationship with him through the months of doing my dogs obedience. He noticed my eagerness to learn and how seriously i took training my dog. We grew in our relationship and he has become one of my best friends. I was also fortunate he was in the process of trying to get a club going. I look forward to the things to come for us and our club.

Dog training is a very hard niche to fit into and be successful, though success is a broad term depending on the individual. My mentor by profession is a dog obedience trainer. He has no formal training, he has tons of hands on experience working with dogs. Aside from training you have to think to, will this be a career or a hobby. By you going to school for it I'm assuming it is to be your profession. Going with the thought it will be a profession, that brings on much more. You have to run a business as well as train dogs. People skills are just as important to a professional dog trainer as is the actual dog training ability.

Sorry for the novel but I am very enthusiastic about dog training, learning more, helping others, the dogs, and the bonds and relationships I have built through these things. It can be a very rewarding thing but it is not something that happens fast. It is a lifelong learning experience. None of the greats of dog training learned it from school, or a book, or a video, or working with a particular dog, or breed. It is all of them combined with time and experience that make them great dog trainers.

Good luck with your pursuit I hope the best for you!

ETA: spelling is Schutzhund*
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The school I would like to go to offers 75% hands on 25% classroom requires you to bring you own dog to train and asigns you a school dog to work with
 

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There is a possibility of running into some problems with that arrangment.

1. training one dog teaches you how to train that dog. You will learn to deal with the dogs particular issues but they will be specific to that dog. If the school gives you a dog, which is sort of confusing to me. Will this be a dog with no prior training, or what?

2. If your dog is to be trained(or theres for that matter) you will be limited by your dogs natural ability as to how advanced you can go. Now I don't mean that in the sense that some dogs cant learn things(though it is true in certain situations).

3. School environment regardless of the subject are set up with time lines and set schedules for the curriculum. The is the exact opposite of how a dog learns. Some learn fast some learn slow. Its all relative to the specific dog. Point being there are some things that have taken me months to teach a dog.(not talking about advanced stuff either).

What will you be "qualified" to do when you graduate from their program. Whats the typical percentage of people who leave there program and become successful trainers.

I just want to be clear, this is not to be taken as negativity. I am just curious as to what all in included/involved in this school.

Have you started at the school yet?
 

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I am a little confused. Are you talking about finding a class or group so that you can learn to train your own dogs in SchH, or are you looking at finding a class or group that teaches you to teach SchH?

If the former, then there are clubs abounds that can help you out. If the latter, I urge caution. Seems like something isn't right. Granted there is a sucker born every second, but most people want trainers that have been in the sport and made contributions to the sport for many years.
 

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Everyone hit the nail on the head. Working dogs in protection is an art that is learned primarily through hands on experience through a mentor. I read lots of stuff and watch videos from many different trainers using different schools of thought. One thing I have come to realize is when reading techniques and methods they make perfect sense. The problem is making them make perfect sense to the dog your working with. The person I am working with was mentored through an older gentleman in a prior club that has sense dis-banded. Though he still stays up to date on all things dog, not only in bite sports but in all realms of dog sports. He tells me dog training is an ever evolving thing and to think you don't need to gain more experience is Novice and arrogant. (this is not directed at anyone just something he told me)

The next thing is to be one of the greats in working dogs in protection sports, you need to see things from both sides of the sleeve. You need to understand what is happening or needs to happen from the helpers point of view as well as the handlers point of view.

You have to realize the different types of helpers, you have trial helpers, you have training helpers, you have helpers who can be both, and you have helpers who can train other helpers. At this point my main focus is as a training helper, due to the fact me and my mentor are the only ones working dogs at this point and my goal is getting our club off the ground. Though he does point out the differences in my actions if I were to have done that exercise at a trial.

Another thing is that an inexperience helper can hurt a dog both physically and mentally. I did most of my stuff initially on a retired SchI GSD. She actually taught me how to be a helper in the beginning. She knew what was expected of her, and did exactly that. I now am working with dogs who have had a fair amount of training already. I do have one dog I have been allowed to start from the beginning with and it is such a joy. My mentor will not allow me to work with a dog who has any issues that need to be worked out, at this point he is at my side telling me what I need to do. He gives me the direction i need to go, and tells me why I am doing whatever i am doing. Point being people will often be very reluctant to let a novice helper work their dogs.


I'm not sure what type of schooling your going to for dog training but I have to ask how much of it is hands on with a dog. Books and videos are great tools but far from coming close to working with dogs. Even working with ones own dog is nothing close to being enough. I learned this when I started working with the dogs in rescue, boy did I have alot to learn about motivating dogs of different temperments and drives. Club dogs are easy to work with they want to work.

You need to find a club to work with. You might start off with an obedience club to gain experience working with dogs of different breeds/drives/temperment. I can honestly say you its not a common occurence for an experienced protection trainer to ask you to come train with them.

I was very fortunate that i hooked up with my mentor through his obedience classes, and from their forged a solid relationship with him through the months of doing my dogs obedience. He noticed my eagerness to learn and how seriously i took training my dog. We grew in our relationship and he has become one of my best friends. I was also fortunate he was in the process of trying to get a club going. I look forward to the things to come for us and our club.

Dog training is a very hard niche to fit into and be successful, though success is a broad term depending on the individual. My mentor by profession is a dog obedience trainer. He has no formal training, he has tons of hands on experience working with dogs. Aside from training you have to think to, will this be a career or a hobby. By you going to school for it I'm assuming it is to be your profession. Going with the thought it will be a profession, that brings on much more. You have to run a business as well as train dogs. People skills are just as important to a professional dog trainer as is the actual dog training ability.

Sorry for the novel but I am very enthusiastic about dog training, learning more, helping others, the dogs, and the bonds and relationships I have built through these things. It can be a very rewarding thing but it is not something that happens fast. It is a lifelong learning experience. None of the greats of dog training learned it from school, or a book, or a video, or working with a particular dog, or breed. It is all of them combined with time and experience that make them great dog trainers

Good luck with your pursuit I hope the best for you!

ETA: spelling is Schutzhund*
Fantastic post! :)

Which school?
 

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Where did you trainer go to school? After i finish my Schooling for being a basic obedience dog trainer I want to specialize in Shutzhund and maybe agility later I think I know where I would like to do my schooling but im curious as to where you and or your trainer(s) went and what you thought about there teaching methods and how they felt about there schooling if you know.
It doesn't work like that. Any trainer becomes a professional by experience and proving they are worth learning from (many years of experience and many titles). There isn't a school for that.
 

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I want to be a helper... one clud about an hour from me. Not sure if they know what they are doing or not. Id like to dress up my neighbor. :) I figured i would take the WAE with my dog and see what happens from there. she is only 13 weeks old though. :)
 

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One other thing to consider that is related to helper work, is that their is a high level of athleticism involved as well. Especially as a trial helper, I have never been involved with a trial, only doing training work at the club. But i will say working 3-4 dogs for 10-15 a piece will wear you down. You have to be enthusiastic and precise with what you do. Your actions or the lack of can hurt the dog or yourself severely.

Most people see someone working with "tough" looking dogs and getting bit and say i want to do that. The ones who actually get the opportunity to pursue it and follow through are few and far between. Most people who are impulsive and want to jump in do not posses the patience to progress in the work. I drive over an hour every friday evening and work my butt off. On top of handling my own dog. But I love doing the work. Both as a handler and helper.

You see lots of people talk about wanting to do it, but a slim few put in the work and actually do it.

To me Helper work and being a dog trainer are two separate fields. I also thing being a Schutzhund(or any bite sport) trainer and a "dog" trainer are completely different.

Also most people get into the club enviroment by training a dog in the sport.

Most helpers get a mentor from being apart of a club.

I dont want to sound mean or rude, but i'm really confused about what your intent is in the grand scheme of things. In regards to you becoming a dog trainer, and what kind or what level you want to be. It sounds like you have seen many different fields of dog training(different venues/sports) and want to do them all. Theres nothing wrong with that and by all means I hope you can.
 

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Could you elaborate on the question, i must be missing something.
Gahh! I shouldn't post while running on 2 hours of sleep. The question was supposed to be directed at the OP.

And I too am wondering which aspect you are looking at, OP? I would definitely just try titling your dog (in whatever) before wanting to jump in. Handling skills are another thing you have to learn. Your dog will be reacting how you handle (no over correcting, teaching properly, time, ect ect)
Just lots to learn! :)
 

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one other thing to consider that is related to helper work, is that their is a high level of athleticism involved as well. Especially as a trial helper, i have never been involved with a trial, only doing training work at the club. But i will say working 3-4 dogs for 10-15 a piece will wear you down. You have to be enthusiastic and precise with what you do. Your actions or the lack of can hurt the dog or yourself severely.

To me helper work and being a dog trainer are two separate fields. I also thing being a schutzhund(or any bite sport) trainer and a "dog" trainer are completely different.
.
sooooooo true!!!!!
 
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