Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My little Dobbie is 14 weeks old now and for a month I have been trying to get him to walk on a leash. He pulls so bad my hand swells up and I loose the feeling and burns at the same time, my entire arm hurts after our walks and my back aches. He comes with me when I pull him ( he knows what the word "come on " means). I have tried carrying treats to get him to come, I have let him pull so hard he whines because he is pulling so hard on his neck ( before I make him stop). I am thinking he may be a "puller" so I am going to try a dog harness on him. I don't want him hurt and I can't be pulled down onto the ground or tripped and I can't let him hurt himself either. I don't think a choke collar would be approporiate either. I have never in my life not been able to leash train a puppy and I have had dogs all my life. Any suggestions? I"m out of things to try myself.
 

·
Dobes Dobles +1
Neo Puppy, Lanah Chi-Cairn X 7 y/o, RIP Eva HADR Rescue Dobe, Sunking's Spock, Lillah Chi-Terrier X
Joined
·
5,718 Posts
Hanna, suggest you check out ths recent DT thread on leash training that has lots of input and resource references: (y)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,777 Posts
He's still really young. Have you tried the 'circle' method--it's descxribed here in a recent thread on leash training. Or the one I still use--if the puppy pulls, I stop--eventually the pup comes back to me see what's happening. I turn and go the opposite direction--when he starts to pull again I stop. And repeat this regularly. Makes walking the dog ridiculous at first and you don't get anywhere but it doesn't take long for even pretty young puppies to figure out they aren't going anyplace unless they are more or less at my side.

I don't use any commands at this point--I save those (and I use three different ones when walking a dog. I use 'Heel' when I want the dog to do an Obedience heel, at my side his shoulder beside my left leg. I use walk for a casual walk --the dog can be a little ahead (but not directly in fron of me) or out to the side or behind me--sniffing and looking at things but not pulling or dragging and OK is with a very loose leash and the dog can stop look, sniff as long as he doesn't go ahead and pull). I treat occasionally when the dog is in position at my side but that it.

Longer process but it does work and I generall use a small prong type collar during the initial training.

dobebug
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
My little Dobbie is 14 weeks old now and for a month I have been trying to get him to walk on a leash. He pulls so bad my hand swells up and I loose the feeling and burns at the same time, my entire arm hurts after our walks and my back aches. He comes with me when I pull him ( he knows what the word "come on " means). I have tried carrying treats to get him to come, I have let him pull so hard he whines because he is pulling so hard on his neck ( before I make him stop). I am thinking he may be a "puller" so I am going to try a dog harness on him. I don't want him hurt and I can't be pulled down onto the ground or tripped and I can't let him hurt himself either. I don't think a choke collar would be approporiate either. I have never in my life not been able to leash train a puppy and I have had dogs all my life. Any suggestions? I"m out of things to try myself.
Hopefully you can overcome your dislike of the prong collar if the dislike stems from the conventional commonly used chrome version of a medieval looking torture device ......... it is not a 'torture' device and it is meant to be humanely used as self correcting device that the offending dog in question determines the level of correction needed to correct the behavior. Think of it as 'a power steering mechanism'. IMHO the 'thinking' necessitating the prong effect to be applied as as a corrective stems from innate canine behaviour in replicating what the dam of a canine litter would do to correct an unruly pup — they use their mouth/teeth in an inhibited biting fashion to bring about order.🧐

If the appearance of a conventional style prong collar strikes you as being offensive then purchase one that has the appearance of a normal flat collar with prongs out of view. Google “ hidden prong collar” and amazon and leerburg web sites will display a variety.....leerburg's are twice the price.
Dog Carnivore Dog breed Collar Companion dog



In all sincerity please re-consider its usage as by the 'sounds' of your post you are days away from personal injury in being unable to restrain your pup and not to mention if an accidental fall should occur your pup most likely will become loose on the street with a dragging leash. Serious thought to provide insight to overcome your dislike of a prong collar. The prongs come with rubber/nylon softener tips therefore even minute pain is avoided.

When using the prong collar it is absolutely vital that the collar be sized by removing a link or two in order that the collar remains at the base of the dog's skull just below its ears. The bio-mechanical force is greatest there as opposed to a collar allowed to slide lower on the dog's neck — hence the power steering effect and far less strain to your personal being as any dog will not continue to inflict further discomfort to itself — it will self correct.

You indicated a harness as a possible alternative. A harness under the circumstances that you are dealing with will only exasperate your problem and if choosing one at this stage then your pup will most definitely never respond to handler control. Once again look at the situation from bio-mechanics as a harness intent is to transfer a pulling load to the shoulders/chest area and most effectively used within tracking, skijouring and 'bike-jouring'. The 'gimicky' halti style device could pose harm for a lunging prone pup in the sense that once again those bio-mechanical forces at the extreme end of the dog's muzzle if over-extended can cause vertebral issues —some more 'food for thought'.

The prong is your only humane corrective device and therefore dispel any misgivings that by using such you feel it to be inhumane — it is not when used as I have described. In all sincerity I hope the content of my post when and if applied you will discover you will no longer face the issue of being on the receiving end of being dragged helplessly down the street. I wish you well and all the best.

In the common bond of Dobermans/Dobermanns .......Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
I got a lot of helpful info on here on using a prong collar better on my pup. I already have a damaged shoulder from my last dog and Arrow is SO powerful. She's a dream now, hardly any pulling. I started using it on her when she almost dislocated my shoulder at five months old but really didn't get good walking till jow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,165 Posts
I have never in my life not been able to leash train a puppy and I have had dogs all my life. Any suggestions? I"m out of things to try myself.
Training multiple dog breeds, especially if they are sporting breeds, is NOTHING like training a high drive working dog breed. Dobermans are bred to be alert and inquisitive, which is exactly what your pup is doing. I HATE harness, they either train your dog to pull (which is what harnesses are meant to do) or they but far too much pressure on the neck which isn't great for a breed already susceptible to neck issues. I'd highly advise seeking out a trainer who's worked with working breeds and has experience with dobermans. They can help you decide if a prong is right for you. You can also see the advice I gave in the thread that was attached above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
Training multiple dog breeds, especially if they are sporting breeds, is NOTHING like training a high drive working dog breed. Dobermans are bred to be alert and inquisitive, which is exactly what your pup is doing. I HATE harness, they either train your dog to pull (which is what harnesses are meant to do) or they but far too much pressure on the neck which isn't great for a breed already susceptible to neck issues. I'd highly advise seeking out a trainer who's worked with working breeds and has experience with dobermans. They can help you decide if a prong is right for you. You can also see the advice I gave in the thread that was attached above.
I can attest to this! My Aussie compared to my shepherd is night and day difference. To be frank training my Aussie was a lot easier and more enjoyable. But it should be worth the work in time!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have heard so much good advice from everybody. I bought a Gentle Leader and it makes my walk tolerable. Noah has to get use to it. At first he walks good then he realizes he cannot just do as he pleases so he grabbs it and gets mad, but I just ignore it and soon he gets interested in something else and our walks continue. Thanks everybody.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Training multiple dog breeds, especially if they are sporting breeds, is NOTHING like training a high drive working dog breed. Dobermans are bred to be alert and inquisitive, which is exactly what your pup is doing. I HATE harness, they either train your dog to pull (which is what harnesses are meant to do) or they but far too much pressure on the neck which isn't great for a breed already susceptible to neck issues. I'd highly advise seeking out a trainer who's worked with working breeds and has experience with dobermans. They can help you decide if a prong is right for you. You can also see the advice I gave in the thread that was attached above.
I would like to find a trainer, but I work afternoons so nobody is around when I am available. I found a Gentle Leader and we are doing much better. Thanks for your advice.I really don't want to put anything on Noah's neck that will hurt him..
 

·
Got mutt?
Leo, Lily, and Simon
Joined
·
14,411 Posts
I would like to find a trainer, but I work afternoons so nobody is around when I am available. I found a Gentle Leader and we are doing much better. Thanks for your advice.I really don't want to put anything on Noah's neck that will hurt him..
Depending on how it's used, a head collar can exert more torque on the neck than a collar. You need to be careful that he doesn't hit the end of his leash hard and whip his head around when using it.
 

·
Registered
2
Joined
·
136 Posts
My experience years ago with the GL on my Rotties turned me against them. The dogs were so stressed by them they drooled to where their whole fronts were wet.

However, I am using one now on Gibbs the German Pinscher, who isn't in love with it but shows no signs of stress. Before I even got him I watched Susan Garrett's podcasts. I think it's this one where she talks about her use of head halters on young dogs:

Garrett Head Halter

I didn't decide at that point I'd use a GL on my coming puppy, but you could say the seed was planted, and when he was pulling like a train, and I couldn't even get him into a puppy kindergarten class without embarrassing myself, I decided to try one because I'm hoping I can do what Garrett talks about and teach him to walk decently with it and then transition him to a normal collar.

My Rottweilers have all been John Deeres too, and I managed to teach them to walk on a leash decently using only their collars, but I really don't want to use prongs and collar corrections. That slim, elegant neck looks so delicate. I am careful to keep him close and not let him get into a position where there will be any sudden jerking or whipping around of his neck.

Ask me next year how well this plan worked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Depending on how it's used, a head collar can exert more torque on the neck than a collar. You need to be careful that he doesn't hit the end of his leash hard and whip his head around when using it.
He is turned around before he gets to the end of his leash.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top