Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know there are probably numerous posts about this but I guess I had to post just one more...
This is going to be long but I need help.
Rocco is 15 months and ever since we got him at 8 weeks he's had the problem.
We have tried everything imaginable to help the problem but it continues. I know exactly why. I work days, my husband works nights. For the most part someone is always home with Rocco. But there are times on the weekend we need to leave him home (weddings, special events) where Rocco will LOSE it.
We've tried everything under the sun. Leaving him alone for small intervals and returning and repeating for longer times... didnt work (we tried this tactic for about 4 months straight... it never worked) Leave him in his crate, he hurts himself to get out. Leave him in a familiar room with his toys and things with our scent, everything gets destroyed. Leave him mentally stimulating games, he doesnt touch them. Frozen treats in a kong, he doesnt even know it exists when we leave. Researching tips from ceasar, none of which have worked. We have talked to our vet, asked numerous dog owners and our breeder. Everyone has GREAT suggestion but just none of them work.
Our neighbours complain about the barking and crying that goes on when we do have to leave him and almost everything in our house has literally gone to the dogs. The room where we usually leave him has destroyed carpet, destroyed walls and he's even chewed up a metal door knob to try and get out.
I don't know whats left. I've heard there is medication to calm them down but I think that is a serious last resort. I'm beginning to wonder if We are at the last resort. I don't want to put Rocco on any meds but am I going to have to??
Please, any advice is greatly appreciated. I just want my dog to be happy and healthy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I should also add that when we are together with him he is SOOO well behaved. it's baffling. He is a perfect gentleman and totally respects my husband and I. It's just when we leave his turns into a completely different dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,784 Posts
I haven't tried this, but I've heard that the Thunder Shirt works for some dogs. Might be worth a try. I'm sure it can be ordered on-line, but I know Petco carries them, also. Good luck with your boy! :)

Jan
 

·
Owned by Dobes since 1975
Joined
·
30,675 Posts
seems quite a few young Doberman, especially the males, can 'develope' seperation anxieties.

I recently took in a young male with seperation anxiety, first time I have dealt with this problem.

I am home 24-7, but I know I am going to have to figure out some way to deal with his problem soon as he is going to have to be left home at times.

If I can figure out a way to get him 'over' it I will let you know.

I know many owners have needed to try medication, it might be worth while to talk to your Vet about it.

Good luck with your boy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,009 Posts
My pup had SA too. hurting heself to get out of the crate...was of little concern, if she could get herself free.
- and she was only in the crate, about 1.5 hours /day.

After out of the crate, always free roam and supervised in our home...22.5 hours/day.
And Amy was taught not to reck her suffies or mouth the couch pillows, etc...which was a key, later on.
I knew with sleeping in our bed & on the couch, during the day, a crate would never do...she wouldn't not stop crying, in there.

So at 4.5 months old, the crate was ditched (it triggered her SA) and she was allowed to sleep on the livingroom couch, when we went out...and it worked.
The $150 LLBean dog bed was ditched when she was only 9 weeks old.

Maybe she learned the cause and effect reasoning, don't destroy anything in the the house...and privileges open up.
- pup had hours of daily bonding with tug play & fetch command training with sit/come/stay/etc.
- pup went off-leash for potty break, from 8 weeks old...so she learned my voice & expectation drills
- furniture recking was not allowed, and she knew it
She still cried some, left alone...but she could soon be trusted as a young puppy.

Now 11.5 y/o, on Friday she was left at my retirement reno job site, with carpentor friend...in the basement.
- Amy still cried for her Dad, 2 minutes whinning & 2 minutes ok, when on & on till I can back with lunch takeout
Our girls SA would only accelerate in a crate and if we go out to a wedding (once a year), our retired neighbor friend has our house key, to let Amy out.
 

·
Owned by Dobes since 1975
Joined
·
30,675 Posts
I am going to start doing a whack of research on this problem. If the weather ever clears up and my Satellite internet connection quits coming and going. :)

Once I think I have an idea of what SA is all about...........history, symptoms, and what to do about it...........I am going to make up a plan that I can implement with this particular dog and our lifestyle, pick a date to begin, stick to the plan and give it a go. :) Wish Chuck and I luck! :)

after reading a few articles, i realize why I have never raised a Dobie with SA before.........
and I totally understand why my new guy Charlie does have SA.

Yikes. I also see why it is such a stressfull issue for both humans and their pets to deal with.

Stress is not good for any of us.

here is a good read............ Separation Anxiety In Dogs and How to Deal with It - Coping with Destructive and Obsessive Compulsive Behaviors
 

·
Owned by Dobes since 1975
Joined
·
30,675 Posts
another good read and ideas...... The Dog Trainer : Separation Anxiety in Dogs :: Quick and Dirty Tips

"Separation anxiety is associated with “velcro dogs,” the ones who follow you from room to room and always want to be resting at your feet or pressing their heads against your leg. So some behavior specialists also suggest independence training in various forms--for instance, practicing stays at a distance.

Be Realistic About What You Can Do

When you and your consultant discuss the plan for your dog, try to be realistic about how much time and effort you can put in. Behavior modification for separation anxiety is effective but can be laborious, and one study found that guardians did best with the simplest, least time-intensive plans. "
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,030 Posts
I have had dogs all my life which turns out to be about 10 + dogs all living to be an old age, I have never had a dog with this problem. I start them out in crates then,loose in the house only leaving for a short time and coming right back.I do not make a fuss when leaving or returning. I tell them to " watch the house " when I leave I do not pet them or make over them when I return right way. I will put down my keys maybe go to the bathroom then have them sit for pets then they go outside. Sorry you are having this problem might be able to do the medications then wean him off the medications over time. When we leave we always leave the radio on for the fur kids, I do put all the trash containers in the bathtub & right before leaving. I have a place I give Buddy a couple of dog cookies & now that Patches the Dachshund is loose also I put her dog cookies under the couch that way no one will argue over dog cookies. I use to put Patches in her crate but now since both are 6 years old and Patches seems to dislike her crate I leave them loose. i know Patches will go under the couch if Buddy gets too rambunctious for her. Good Luck with your boy have you tried Rescue Remedy ? since it is herbal may take awhile to kick in. They also have air infusers that you plug into the wall with soothing mother dog pheromones suppose to calm a dog down. I saw them once at Petco I believe.
 

·
Sashagirl
Joined
·
119 Posts
It sounds like you are attempting all of the savvy tricks; you might need to just look into a behaviorlist or doggy daycare! Also, have you ever considered getting him a companion, I know when I got Sasha it helped my jack Russell out with all of his many neurotic type behaviors.
 

·
terriorist entertainer
Joined
·
2,404 Posts
finding a reliable puppy sitter might be the best option....sometimes it's very much like having kids.
but keep on with the leave for a short time/come back...praise, reward desired behaviour...just find the length of time he can consistently cope with and allow it to plateau there for a while...for a month or so....then slip one slightly longer time away in, like an extra 1/2 hr once or twice in the next month period. repeat this pattern, each month extending 2 times by 1/2 hr, but if he has a freak out, return to the shorter time he could cope with and plateau it there for the next month. This condition takes a lot of time and effort to correct, and needs working on 5-6 days a week. (2 random full days where he can just relax). Time in crate when you're home is also part of the plan.

Make sure he's really well exercised before you go out, so he's more inclined to sleep, and has had a little bit of food. I've also found with Basil, that he settles better now that he has a snuggle blanket in his crate that he can bury himself into (as well as his bed). I've got Basil coping with up to 5 hrs now. This has taken 4 months of daily practice. (and sometimes 2 sessions in one day....but the 2nd session is much, much shorter ie. 1hr).

Have patience, keep going with a consistant program that he can cope with, it's a long haul and frustrating condition to deal with. Basil is my second dog to have it, so I'm going in with faith this time that it can be managed to a degree due to my experiences with Zil.
but I also know it takes a lot of time....
Good luck....I really do empathise.
 

·
terriorist entertainer
Joined
·
2,404 Posts
I didn't really like the Ron Hines article that much...whilst there was some valuable information in there, I wasn't all that impressed with his "logic" in places...there were a couple of times that his conclusions didn't follow on from his premises (ie that a bacterial triggered condition is why you shouldn't over-vaccinate...there's a lot of premises missing from that argument).

I thought the second article was generally well expressed and presented, and contained lots of useful strategies.

ETA: I thought the last article was excellent too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Is there like a doggy day care or something he could go to?
This is probably a random idea. My mum takes rafferty to a ladies house that
does daycare for dogs. Raff has SA so we needed to take him out of the place he gets it
The most. the place needed to occupy him from thinking about us lol.
She looks after about 6-8 dogs at a time and has activites and things for them thru out the day.
First few days he'd misbehave etc and whine but she did all different activites n stuff and his now happy to go there and we dont have to sneek out of her house we can say bye and collect him either the next day or in the afternoons. Its worked a treat!
He still whines a bit when we leave him in the house but because she uses kongs and food tricks we just leave them there for him until wer back.

Not sure whats happening where you are but if you could maybe look into it?
Just a thought of how we got round it anyway and it was a perfect place for him to socialise!

Best of luck, it must be head wrecking but hopefully he'll get out of it.
:)
 

·
Owned by Dobes since 1975
Joined
·
30,675 Posts
Stina, please update us to how things are going when you get the chance.

I am still getting to know my new guy, but have a few ideas of what I can work on to help with the seperation anxiety.

I have noticed that Charlie cannot seem to just go outside and be a dog, :) , he is always looking to me to entertain him. If it even looks like I am going to close the house door and leave him outside he starts to panic and if I do close him out he jumps on the door and runs around from gate to door barking, so I am going to start working on having him stay outside without me.

I do not want to start with the crate as he will injure himself trying to get out, he has escaped all makes of crates in former homes. And as I rarely use crates anymore and never leave one in a crate if I have to go to town as I have wood heat in my cabin, my dogs have always gone into outside pens if i need to leave them at home.

So, crate training will come later. Right now Charlie needs to learn how to be by himself and the great outdoors is the best place to learn that, so much to do and see, once he settles down and relaxes, he will learn that being by himself is not so bad.
Then once he is better with being 'alone', i will start working on leaving him in one of the dog pens off and on and see how it goes.

Of course we will still have our fun times together everyday too! :)
 

·
Alpha Male
Joined
·
43 Posts
Our doberman has "mild" SA.. before we got him we researched alot of dobermans have the problem. so ever since he was 6 weeks old we left him alone for long periods of time. It does seem to bother him anymore but we noticed he becomes destructive if hes not left in his crate. he used to bite his nails when he was left alone but we left the radio and or TV on while we were gone and it seemed to help alot. maybe get your dog a crate that's not wire? maybe it will help so he doesn't hurt himself. The vet said he could give us a form of Zoloft but i don't think we need it anymore. although i heard it works wonders.
 

·
Owned by Dobes since 1975
Joined
·
30,675 Posts
I decided to start with a gate across the open door first.

:)

Charlie stood there for almost 1 hour just whimping and whining.


I ignored him.

then I just got up and went outside like nothing happened.

hopefully after 20 to 2000 times he will start walking around the property without me and start to get it that it is OK to be by himself at times.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top