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My puppy is in the middle of crate training but I've noticed he is very anxious when I am not around for example this morning it was around 2 in the morning he started whining in his cage I got up took him outside to use the toilet, when I brought him back in I put him in his crate and instantly he started whining, to get him to be quite because we have a 6 month old baby and we live in an apartment I would go to his crate tell him to lay down and then walk away and try to get some sleep, it didn't work so eventually my fiance got up and took him out of his cage so he would be quite and because of that I left the room because I was angry and the puppy started screaming again. My fiance decided to just let him out of the room and my puppy ran right too me and laid down beside the couch and went to sleep.

So after my long example (sorry) how do I help him with his separation anxiety and help him with his crate (he loves his crate and will go in there throughout the day to sleep, just the moment the door closes he screams.

For the crate I've tried just leaving him in it so he calms down that didn't work because for a good 3 hours while I was grocery shopping he howled
 

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He’s got you trained well,……lol.

Start from zero and build up from there. Close the door, open it up immediately. Repeat the process, each time adding more crate time; be sure he sees you and knows that you’re close.

Don’t give in,…….
 

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You have a 6-old human and a Doberman puppy? That is a recipe for insanity.

You have to realize that your puppy is about as equipped to handle the world as your human baby. The puppy may be in a fear stage (there are several dogs go through), may not be getting the type of mental exercise he needs, and as @NOLAdoberman67 wrote, has you trained.

You aren’t even to the worst part of Doberman puppyhood. Consider returning the puppy to the breeder OR start educating yourself on dog behavior.

Are you creating enrichment opportunities for the puppy by exposing him to all sorts of sights and noises and textures and and and…? Everything you do now will either create a dog that fits in with your family as a fun and gentle companion or become a dog that makes up his own rules. You should have him in a puppy class.

Many people struggle with crating. If you are one of them, here are the times I used to get my boy comfortable in the crate. Remember, all puppies are different and some will take to crating in a day and others may take 6 months or more.

CRATING TIPS

  1. Start feeding every dinner in the crate WITH the door open or doing a kibble scatter in the crate with a portion of the pup’s daily amount of food.
  2. Several times a day, play “go crate”. Take some high-value treats and toss a couple into the back of the crate. Let your puppy go in to get the treat. WAIT until he does this. It may take awhile but if the treat is good enough (I’m talking hot dogs or chicken breast or cheese) the puppy will get it. Toss it and say “go crate!” Or “kennel up!” in a high, happy voice.
    1. - When the puppy comes back out, toss another treat and repeat the command and praise when the puppy gets the treat. If you do this enough, your puppy will begin to go into the crate on his own because he will associate the action with something fun.
  3. In the meantime, as you teach that, make the crate comfortable and safe. Try it covered, try it uncovered. Place the crate is somewhere near the action but on the periphery so the pup has comfort of you being there but the family traffic isn’t such that there is a lot of action with people passing back and forth, children playing, or loud reactions to a sports game, etc.
  4. When you put the pup into the crate, be calm and gentle but don’t coddle the pup, just be matter of fact. There should be a durable puppy safe toy to chew as chewing generates self-soothing. Close the door and leave. Put in ear plugs, if you have to. Living in a condo building built in 1938 I didn’t have that luxury as sounds carries in the strangest ways. So what I did was to get an app on the iPad and iPhone which sets up a baby monitor situation. When my pup would start to scream, I could engage the microphone and speak to him. That helped a lot.
  5. If all else fails and your puppy is really distressed, and never calms down in the crate, speak to your vet about medication. I can’t speak to that but I do know some folks whose puppies were self-harming because they were so distressed in a crate.
At the end of the day, it is your responsibility to care for your puppy and help him learn the ways of these strange aliens, known as humans. You need to set him up for success. It won’t always be easy to keep your patience and train everyday, but if you can do that, you will have a wonderful companion that will enrich your life in ways you can never imagine!

Please keep in mind that this is only my experience and I am just a dog owner with 25 years of experience with working breeds. I am not a dog trainer per se nor I am not an animal behaviorist, so I can’t guarantee this will work for you. That noted, any time you invest significant time in training and engaging with your dog will result in a deeper bond and easier training of other skills. Good luck and I hope this helps a bit.
 

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Quote from MMc : You need to set him up for success.

This is some of the best advice a person can receive !

When I joined DT 6 years ago , one of the first posts I read on here was by Meadowcat , and she said the same thing - Set your dog up for success ! I took that to heart !

Dobermans have to have something to do and if they get bored , they will find their own way to entertain themselves and that it not a good thing , like getting into trash , why ? because somebody left it out , or stealing the dish rag , Why ? because I left it out where they could get it . 99% of any problem I have had is because of me lol
 

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Excellent advice above.
All I will add is that I am the grandma to 2 girls (they are 5 month old and 16 month old sisters). I left our puppy with my daughter-in-law briefly. She nannies for SEVEN children, 5 St Bernards, a pig, and a flock of chickens daily. Our puppy about did her in. Doberman pups are on a whole different level ;-)

Raising a baby and a puppy definitely can be done, but you're going to have to dig down deep to find the time and energy to provide what the puppy needs after all you do for your family.
 
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