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Don't expect a lot from the pup until he's had time to adjust to a new place and new people. And keep him attached to you with a leash until you are sure he is actually house trained. Basically I'd bet you will have to start from ground zero--as if he was a very large but baby puppy.

And if he didn't get a lot of attention when he was younger he probably has a bunch of bad habits he figured out for himself.

Good luck--just pretend he's still a blank slate and you'll find he'll learn fast.

dobebug
 

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It will be tempting to stay with her all day BUT you will do everyone a favor if you begin introducing the crate in a slow, calm, happy way. She will need to learn how to settle on her own and you will want to leave the house at some point.

Good luck!
 

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Yes, good luck. I'm sure you'll get it worked out.

Just to clarify. I opened this thread expecting it to be about someone looking for a home for a 17-month-old, not someone taking one in. You're not rehoming. That's what the person who gave her up did. You're adopting. That's what the person giving a dog a new home is doing.
 

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I agree with crate time even if you work from home. I work from home and my almost 8 mo old still goes in the crate for some time in the morning and afternoon. My 4 year old, however, has freedom in the house even though he is crate trained. Also look for a local training club and enroll in a class. It’s a great way to bond.
 

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Look into the method "Two Week Shutdown" Even if you don't use it in its entirety, these tips and the reasoning behind the method are useful:


Here's an explanation about two-week shutdowns, from Bulldogbreeds,com:

"TWO WEEKS -- 'shut down'

For the first two weeks, (sometimes even longer) a dog takes in the new environment: who is the top person, or animal; who ARE these people!? By pushing a dog too fast, and throwing too much at the dog we look like we are not the leaders, and the dog can feel it MUST defend itself as the leader is surely no one he has met so far!

We coo, coddle, drag the dog to home to home to person to person, and the dog has NO idea who we are. We correct for things it doesn’t understand; we talk in a new human language using words he does not know.

A key thing to remember is that this is the dating period, NOT the honeymoon. When you first met your spouse or significant other, you were on your best behavior--you were not relaxed enough to be all of yourself, were you? Just think of the things you do physically once you get to KNOW a person. You wouldn’t run up to a stranger and hug them and squeeze them!

Imagine, if on the first date, this new person, was all over you touching you and having their friends hug you and pat you on the head, and jostle your shoulders, looked in your mouth then he whisked you off to another stranger's home and they did the same thing.

Would you think this person normal and SAFE? Wouldn’t you feel invaded and begin to get a bit snarky or defensive yourself? Wouldn’t you think to push these people away for obviously your date is out of their mind, as they aren’t going to save you from these weirdoes!!

Yet we do this very thing to our dogs, and then get upset or worried that they aren’t relaxed and accepting of EVERYTHING instantly!

By shutting down the dog, it gives the dog TIME to see you, to meet YOU, to hear and take in the new sounds and smells of your home and all the people in it. This process will take time--two weeks, at least.
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Crate the dog in a room by itself if possible.(Believe me, dogs are sensory animals, they know more than you think without seeing it).

Leash the dog (so you don’t have to correct it --you don’t have that right yet!), give it exercise time in the yard on a lunge line or in a fenced yard. Keep it LEASHED (yes, leash it in the house too.)

Do no training at all, just fun exercise and maybe throw some toys for fun, leash the dog if you don’t have a fence outside. But DO NOT leave the yard, AT ALL.

No car rides, no other dogs, (unless crated beside them), no pet stores, no walks, NOTHING but you and household family, your home, your yard. (Unless of course the dog needs to go to the veterinarian.) Believe me, dogs can live two weeks without walks. Walks are stressful for there is so much coming at you and your dog! And the dog has no clue who you are yet. The dog may react to something and we start correcting it with the leash and we just installed a VERY STRESSFUL moment to the dog in what should be a fun and learning walk.

TEACH the dog by doing the shut down that YOU are the one to look to, that you are now here for the dog! He can trust in you and look to you for guidance. Then you can venture out into new situations one at a time; the dog knows he can trust in his new humans and can relax under the fair guidance of his new leaders!

In the house take the dog out only for about 20-30 minute intervals , just pottying/excercise/yard times, and ALWAYS on a leash when in the house or in an unfenced yard. Exercise is important! Running and free time are stress relievers, but don’t set your dog up for failure, make exercise and yard time fun and relaxing and tiring!

Then PUT THE DOG AWAY. let it absorb and think and relax. Ignore crying or barking, just like a new born baby, he must find security when you are not right there, and if you run to him each time he will think barking and crying will get your attention.

I do not introduce resident dogs for these two weeks. They can be side by side in the crates, (not nose to nose for they can feel defensive) . Some dogs will bond instantly with the other dogs if we don’t bond FIRST with the dog, and this can lead to some other issues, as the dog will look to the other dog(s) for guidance and not YOU!

Literally in two weeks you will see a change in the dog and begin to see its honest and true personality. Just like a house guest.. they are well behaved and literally shut down and “polite” themselves these first few weeks, then post this time, they relax and the true personality begins to shine thru.

So, please,, if nothing else for your new dog, give it the time to LEARN YOU as you are learning who they are! This method works on shy dogs, confident dogs, abuse cases, chained dogs that come in, rowdy dogs, all temperaments!"
 

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If the previous home had no time for her, you need to get close with her. If you have not had a Doberman before they are not just dogs. They thrive when you get up close and personal with them and treat them as if they are "special". Of course, this will be after she gets adjusted to the new house and warms up to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, good luck. I'm sure you'll get it worked out.

Just to clarify. I opened this thread expecting it to be about someone looking for a home for a 17-month-old, not someone taking one in. You're not rehoming. That's what the person who gave her up did. You're adopting. That's what the person giving a dog a new home is doing.
Thank you for the clarification!
 

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Thanks so much for giving this Dobe a chance. When sending one of our rescue Dobes to their new home, we give a packet of information on decompressing and not overwhelming the dog with a lot of new peole and new environments for at least the first two weeks. Please PM your email and I will gladly send you this. Also, we like to go by the Rule of 3:

Vertebrate Organism Mammal Font Terrestrial plant
 

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Thanks so much for giving this Dobe a chance. When sending one of our rescue Dobes to their new home, we give a packet of information on decompressing and not overwhelming the dog with a lot of new peole and new environments for at least the first two weeks. Please PM your email and I will gladly send you this. Also, we like to go by the Rule of 3:

View attachment 149814
I'd say the rule of 3 is a good one. I just rescued a Dober boy back on April 15. In the last couple weeks he has finally settled down somewhat to be a normal year old Dobe. He still MUST have tons of attention (pets rubs luvin). He no longer gulps his food down and will eat it at a normal pace, although he is still a DoberVac.

The trip home with him.
Dog Dog breed Carnivore Snout Sporting Group

And now.
Brown Dog Vertebrate Carnivore Comfort


Here's one of both of my Dobes on a road trip. (He's the one on the left)
Glasses Dog Goggles Sunglasses Dog breed

Glasses Dog Goggles Sunglasses Vision care
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks so much for giving this Dobe a chance. When sending one of our rescue Dobes to their new home, we give a packet of information on decompressing and not overwhelming the dog with a lot of new peole and new environments for at least the first two weeks. Please PM your email and I will gladly send you this. Also, we like to go by the Rule of 3:

View attachment 149814
I'd say the rule of 3 is a good one. I just rescued a Dober boy back on April 15. In the last couple weeks he has finally settled down somewhat to be a normal year old Dobe. He still MUST have tons of attention (pets rubs luvin). He no longer gulps his food down and will eat it at a normal pace, although he is still a DoberVac.

The trip home with him.
View attachment 149815
And now.
View attachment 149816

Here's one of both of my Dobes on a road trip. (He's the one on the left)
View attachment 149817
View attachment 149818
so cute! This is the girl I just got…
Dog Dog breed Carnivore Companion dog Fawn
 

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I'd say the rule of 3 is a good one. I just rescued a Dober boy back on April 15. In the last couple weeks he has finally settled down somewhat to be a normal year old Dobe. He still MUST have tons of attention (pets rubs luvin). He no longer gulps his food down and will eat it at a normal pace, although he is still a DoberVac.

The trip home with him.
View attachment 149815
And now.
View attachment 149816

Here's one of both of my Dobes on a road trip. (He's the one on the left)
View attachment 149817
View attachment 149818
Hey Wrangler--I notice in the first picture that it looked like Dax was trying to get Wrangler's(F) ear to stand? How's his formerly (?) floppy ear doing--looked like it was on it's way to standing the last ear pic's I saw.

What a fine pair...

dobebug
 

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Hey Wrangler--I notice in the first picture that it looked like Dax was trying to get Wrangler's(F) ear to stand? How's his formerly (?) floppy ear doing--looked like it was on it's way to standing the last ear pic's I saw.

What a fine pair...

dobebug
It'll stand about 90% of the time. When he gets really tired it starts flopping.
 
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