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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So i know I'm starting this thread out completely on the wrong foot but honestly I don't know any other way due to frustration. What is going on in the doberman community? Let me clarify and start from the beginning.

My wife and I have always wanted a doberman, we just bought a house with a nice size yard and are completely ready to take on the trials of working dog ownership. Yes, this would be our 1st and probably only dog for the lifespan. Here's where thing get tricky. We have another pet (rabbit) my wife ,and i must admit even myself, love her. So she isnt going anywhere. We also would like to start our family within the next year as well. Why cant we have all these thing together? Even if separated? A lot of ppl out there in the community are giving this impression. Excuse the interpretation but I had nooooooooo idea doberman owners/breeders were such ELITISTS. That may come off a bit strong but I have even come across other threads on the forum where long time members are accusing others of the same.

We live in NJ so are mainly looking in the surrounding areas. After looking at the AKC and DPCA we emailed and called at least 20 breeders in the area introducing ourselves and asking a couple generic questions. Only 1 got back to us in an open and friendly way. The other (few) that even responded back were unkind and almost "offput" by having to talk to a non doberman owner.

So whats a guy supposed to do when he wants to own his dream dog but is getting no positive feedback?
 

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You may be presenting yourself wrong--see:

http://www.dobermantalk.com/puppy-corner/119602-puppy-buyer-etiquette.html

Make sure you’ve done your research about dobe ownership so you can answer a breeder’s questions with knowledge...breeders consider their puppies part of the family and naturally want them to go to the best homes possible.

Also puppies and babies are very tough to have together. Both require a LOT of work--it can be hard to find time for both. And puppies are such klutzes; they bite and they nip; they chase small fleeing objects--they can tromple all over a little kid, knock them down, nip at them...usually the puppy gets blamed for hurting the child, even though he is simply being a puppy--not a good situation. A lot of breeders won’t sell to people who have little ones on the floor for these reasons alone.

Is your rabbit loose in the house? Dobes are dogs who absolutely NEED to be with their owners. Obviously, if you spend your time inside, that’s where they belong too. If your rabbit is used to roaming the house...well...accidents can happen. Things would not end well for the bunny.

Some breeders don’t respond back because they are not planning litters at that particular time. Even if they have puppies on the ground, they may already have a waiting list. Also many breeders are focusing on showing their dogs at the moment--it can take a while for them to get in touch with folks inquiring about their dogs, and they usually have *real* jobs too--time only stretches so far.
 

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Hi, I'm relatively new to the doberman community, too.

For a few years, I have bred and shown basset hounds. I have some basset hound champions and I breed 100% free of health problems and to conformation standards. Within any purebred dog community, there are your snobs, but in years of being around the beagle, basset, and even afghan hound communities, I NEVER encountered the ill treatment that I have since recently entering into the doberman community.

It all started when I posted a picture of my pup in an online social media group with about 15,000 members. Within minutes, I had dozens of comments and many asked where I got him. I stated the breeder name and was instantly harassed and told my dog was nothing, was from a BYB, and that he would die of cardio failure on a walk one day. I was told I was stupid and did no research and they even went as far as to go on my personal profile and screen shot still pictures from videos of my basset hounds and insult the appearance of my dogs. I tagged an administrator of the group on that post as the rules stated one should do if they needed help, and instead of handling the bullies, the administrator banned me from the group.

So far, this forum has been REALLY helpful to me and no one has acted elitist. Everyone has been very informative without being condescending and have just told me to get a more reputable breeder should I decide to get another dobie in the future. I am still testing the waters on this site, though, in case any from the social media groups I was a member of are on here and recognize my name, the info about my dog, or my dog's pictures.

Stay positive... this place really is helpful and I'm glad I found a place to learn without getting put down or straight harassed.
 

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please do not get discouraged in a lot of cases we started somewhere and with time, knowledge and research we all learned. Dobermans are not an easy breed to own so having a community where you can ask questions is a god send. I still continue to learn after 28 years of being owned by a dobies and yes I continue to ask questions because each new dog comes with their own unique problems.
 

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If you have done your research on the breed you know that there are several health issues with the breed. A Breeder who is doing what is necessary to improve the overall condition of the doberman and has a history to prove it , most of their pups can have a committed home at conception.
Be patient and persistent with the "elitist" and let them know exactly what you want out of a dog , theses type of breeders are more concerned with finding a proper home for one of their pups than depositing money.
The alternative to the elitist can be heartbreaking!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks guys I really appreciate the feedback. We have def done our research on the health issues, the community, the breeders and mentality. I actually like the idea of "right dog for the right home" idea. Especially because we firmly believe we are great people for a doberman. We love activities, outdoors, hiking...blah blah blah haha. So i guess really the next question (because we certainly arent giving up) does anybody have any recommendations on a breeder in the area we could try? Is there a forum slotted for that?

Also, any type of lingo i should be learning up on before i step into the ring with a breeder asking questions about their sire, dam, and pedigrees?:laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
just keep looking and calling.... :)

Also, not sure if you would be interested, but there are many Doberman in rescue needing homes. It might be worth it to check out a few.

Good luck in whatever you choose to do.
Thank you for the reply!
Yeah so today we started looking at rescue dobermans. Our friends have rescued and had much success with their pitbulls so naturally they want us to rescue. But I just kind of figured most of those dogs probably came from BYB and may have underlying health problems. How can we approach a rescue dog and be sure we are getting a solid doberman? Just this week we had to put down one of our pets after only a year because he had underlying health issues. Really not looking to go through that again any time soon :/
 

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Thank you for the reply!
Yeah so today we started looking at rescue dobermans. Our friends have rescued and had much success with their pitbulls so naturally they want us to rescue. But I just kind of figured most of those dogs probably came from BYB and may have underlying health problems. How can we approach a rescue dog and be sure we are getting a solid doberman? Just this week we had to put down one of our pets after only a year because he had underlying health issues. Really not looking to go through that again any time soon :/
My first dobe was a rescue, she wasn't the prettiest - her shoulders too narrow, head a little small, uncropped ears that folded a little wonky, etc, but she was an amazing dog that I got at 6-8 months old and had until she passed away at just shy of 14 years old. She made me love the breed. She never had a single health problem, unless you count a broken toenail, until arthritis crept up on her and finally got so severe we felt it was time to put her down.

You never know what will happen to an individual dog, no line is free of the many health issues that plague the breed, but responsible breeders try their best to breed with health in mind and their dogs live much longer on AVERAGE.

My hesitation with rescues was temperament issues. This can be screened through temperament tests. If you do your homework and know what red flags to look for you may be able to avoid this. Temperament is like health - no dog is immune, good breeders breed for it, but there are still outliers.
 

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Hello!

I echo the sentiment of adopting from rescue.

I must admit I have questionable feelings when you mention you and your wife are contemplating starting your family. I got the gist of a baby.

i think the rabbit will be safe. I worry about the dog being no longer convenient when a baby arrives.

Speaking from the rescue side, dobes seem to go in to the rescue system when they are no longer convenient. A baby came.

I am not trying to be mean at any rate. I just get defensive when people are trying to get too many babies at one time.

Please don't take offense. None intended. My hackles go up when a nerve gets hit.

:x

Sit back and watch me get clubbed!

:|

You have to have a tough skin on this site.

:2surprise:
 

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:x

Sit back and watch me get clubbed!

:|

You have to have a tough skin on this site.

:2surprise:
You have to have a thick skin to be in the doberman community in general. No matter how healthy or well-bred a doberman is, someone somewhere within the community is going to have something negative to say.

I'm learning to just enjoy my dobie and not dwell on the fact that he came from a breeder that is apparently not well-respected and from a bloodline that many have informed me has "issues". It's a very unique breed that many owners, breeders, show people, and trainers are super passionate about, and where passion exists, things can get heated.
 

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My first Doberman was a senior rescue, she was 9ish when we got her and she lived to 12ish, which is pretty amazing in my opinion. Getting an adult rescue might be your best bet, as you'll know their temperament better and they won't need as much work. Dobermans are pretty slow to mature, I like to say my Danes and Dobermans don't have brains until they are 3.

Another consideration is getting a re-home from a reputable breeder. That is what I have right now, a one year Doberman that the breeder kept to potentially show, and she still might show her, but probably won't breed her. This was a win-win for me, since I have the benefit of knowing her lines and her temperament, but not having to do the heaving lifting of puppy raising. My Great Dane was raised with kids since he was born, but he doesn't care for them now as an adult. He is just a naturally nervous dog, and that didn't really come out until he was 10 months old. So that was one thing I was specifically looking for when getting a new dog, a dog that loves and seeks out children.
 

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Most of the breeders I know are really not snobbish, but can be curt. They deal with a lot of idiots wanting a Doberman - as I did when I was on the DPCA breeders list. It gets old and so you don't have a lot of patience with people.
If you feel they are being snobbish, I'd like to know what they are being snobbish about? A good breeder has high standards for homes for their puppies - some people get all upset if they don't meet with those standards for some reason..... and there could be many reasons. So before you just lump some very fine people together as "snobs", I'd like to know your reasons for it.
 

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You think you've got it rough, try being a single 21 year old wanting to make a male Doberman her first ever dog lol! (aside from the family dog growing up which was a Samoyed). I must have called and written two dozen breeders before one took a chance on me and these were the days before email (oh God I feel old). Most I never even heard back from, one even hung up on me. Be patient, if it's meant to be, it will happen.

I do agree with the others though, a rescue or an older breeder re-home may be the better way to go. Doberman puppies can be little terrors and a full time job in and of themselves. Adding a baby to the mix may be too much.

As far as health goes, there really is no guarantee so don't let that deter you. Trust me, I speak from experience. I reasearched breeders for 2 years and got my boy from a wonderful, well respected breeder who did everything right and health tested to the hilt. All my boys siblings, mother, father and even grandmother are still alive and healthy. Sadly, my boy has severe allergies, seizures and copper storage disease. My rescue girl from a horrible BYB on the other hand is as healthy as can be.

Another thing to consider is that if you are an active family, it will be a while before a puppy grows enough that they can safely join you. An older dog could be good to go hiking, biking, running or whatever else right away

The internet is a brutal place. People say things they would never say in person. In person, I have found the Doberman community as a whole to be helpful, informative and supportive. And this site and the people on it have been a life line to me and saved my sanity while struggling with Soters health issues.

Best of luck :)
 

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Most of the breeders I know are really not snobbish, but can be curt. They deal with a lot of idiots wanting a Doberman
I generally agree with Mary Jo, but maybe I'd say "guarded" rather than curt. It's true that breeders deal with a lot of idiots. I used to get 200+ enquiries a year, which is a lot to deal with on top of a job, family, errands, the commitment to the dogs I have, tasks, etc and quite frankly, the internet frequently brings out the lowest common denominator. I don't know how to say that without sounding snobby. We do hear from a LOT of people who have no business trying to acquire a dog. Any dog. But we're talking about Dobermans ...

Face it, this is a breed that doesn't fit everywhere. There are issues - housing issues, insurance issues, the simple expense of owning them, breed legislation issues, health issues, temperament issues, etc. These things make us guarded. We've seen/heard what happens so we've learned to screen carefully and to be choosy. I'm not sure that makes someone an "elitist". Certainly a realist, which is pretty important with this breed.

I'll admit that when we were part of the GSP (German shorthair pointer) community as well as the Doberman community, we found the GSP community a lot more welcoming and friendly. But they don't really have the issues I was talking about above. Sure, the GSP isn't right for everyone either but a GSP would probably fit better into more homes, in general, than a Doberman would. The same can be said for many breeds - some of them are just a lot easier than others to fit more seamlessly into homes and don't have the same rescue issues the Doberman has. I think responsible Doberman breeders know the reasons why Dobermans end up in rescue, and they are really going to try their best to guard their puppies/dogs.
 

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Ok enough seriousness here. Remember it could always be worse. Try the German Shepherd communities. Yep yep. I understand where you are coming from. Don't take offense even though it may seem hard. Listen to what they have to say and just keep it in the back of your mind, it may make sense later. If you are determined to have a Doberman it will happen. If you go to some of these shows you will see that the Doberman community is a rather large community. No two people are going to agree on anything regardless if it is "curt" or "guarded" lol. The more people in a community the more disagreements there will be over small things and over big things and over people trying to make big things out of small things. Keep looking you want to find someone who has the same objectives or at least objectives that you understand. It will work out just keep persistence.
 

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If you are able to go out to some shows or get in touch with your local DPCA chapter club, you could meet some people in person. I find that shows that you are serious about wanting to learn about the breed, meet dogs in person, talk to people, etc. I would suggest that as a better method than calling people. You can watch the Dobermans show, and then talk to people afterward. It's a great way to actually meet some of the dogs and have a more "real" conversation with back and forth, nuance, etc. Your local club is also often a great resource...as a club member I've met with people who are interested in the breed, sent recommendations on to a breeder, helped people become more tuned in to the local Doberman community. Just some other avenues to explore.
 

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Not all of us are snobs, there are many really nice people in the Doberman community and of course, there are those that aren't so nice. In a lot of instances, I think sometimes the response you get is because there are never enough puppies for homes wanting them. However, I don't accept that as an excuse to be rude. We all have our individual requirements for our puppies. For instance, I require a physically fenced yard/area. If you don't have a fenced yard/area, I will certainly talk to you, and I will be kind, but I won't make an exception, because I have a waiting list of well vetted homes with fenced yards/areas, thus I don't have to compromise.

Do be prepared to wait a bit. Most have a waiting list, so once you find a breeder you connect with, get on their waiting list and be patient.

Try joining and posting on the Facebook Group, Doberman Pinscher Breeders List. There are several upcoming litters announced on this list, and the group requires health testing, title, etc. to post.

Good luck with your search.
 
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Yes, there is very much of an attitude with many breeders that you have to have already owned a Doberman to qualify to buy from them, so they know you have a track record of being able to handle it.

You could get a rescue or other Dobe in need of being rehomed, but that can be a substantial risk depending on why each individual was surrendered. Most are just fine, regardless of breeding, it's that their incompetent first owners had no clue what they were doing. The risk comes from the possibility of severe temperament and health issues. Be choosy and don't fall into pity mode; plenty need homes, but it doesn't do you or the dog any favors if you adopt a troubled pity case that you are not in a good position to manage their behavioral issues or health needs.

If you aren't getting the time of day from the breeders you've been talking to, just expand your search. I wouldn't even recommend buying from the first "reputable breeder" who gives you the time of day, they're most definitely not all equals. While you need to be especially careful when it comes to the lower-end breeders who advertise in classifieds and such, you should be extremely choosy across the board when it comes to buying a puppy from a breeder. Pay very close attention to how they interact with their adult animals and the puppies. See how they live and how their dogs live. Pay very close attention to the condition of all adult dogs on premises, and press them for details on their breeding philosophy. Try to get an idea of what their goals are and how many litters they produce. Look at the sire and dam in person if at all possible (at least the dam) to. Judge the puppies objectively for conformation and indications of temperament as best you are able.

Personally, I would not patronize anyone who seems to be breeding only for the money or who is not passionate about the breed. I would not patronize someone who doesn't treat all their dogs like valued members of the family. I would not patronize people who I get any weird or uncomfortable vibes whatsoever from. If I have any doubts, I keep looking. It doesn't matter if I'm looking at an adult dog which needs to be rehomed, at high-end puppies, or low-end puppies, for a critter I plan to have for the rest of it's life, I will do whatever I can to assure success without compromises.
 
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