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Raw Feed vs Home Cooked

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Excuse me if this has already been answered I just wasn't able to find it in my search.

I was wondering what everyone's thoughts were on raw feeding their dog versus home cooked meals. I know when my parents were young they wouldn't raw feed their dobermans because it was believed that it would make them more aggressive so everything was cooked.

Another concern was that raw meat has bacteria that can make them sick so that's why they wouldn't even give raw bones.

So I guess my question is why do those who raw feed prefer that over cooking the meat and the benefits of it. While those who do home cooked meals prefer that over raw feed and the benefits of that!
 

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Bazinga!
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Ultimately the decision between feeding raw and home cooked is a personal one.
Regardless of what one chooses to feed homework should be done. I mean just because a company pays graphic artists a lot of money to create pretty packaging doesn't mean squat.




Home cooked requires more work and more supplementation as cooking destroys a lot of the nutrition in the meats.

Contrary to popular belief the risks bacteria and feeding raw are not nearly as high as many would assume. There is more risk with bacteria feeding kibble compared to feeding human grade meats.

It comes down to education. The biggest issue with most home cookers is the lack of calcium and the addition of too much carb and vegetable into the diet.
Many people assume a fistful of supplements will balance everything out, sadly not everything is bioavailable.

I feed raw because I want to know what I am feeding. I don't cut corners I don't purchase garbage and turn it into food for my dogs. I feed as whole as possible with as much variety as possible.
 

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I personally feed raw after researching it for a long time. I prefer it over cooked food, because as SeiYa mentioned, cooking it destroys some of the significant nutrition that's of benefit to your pet (and admittedly I find raw a lot easier). I like the variety that I can feed my dog and he has a feeding schedule that everyone in my household adheres to. There are some home cooked diets for dogs that are good, but you do need to supplement them with what is taken out once cooked. Admittedly, most dogs will probably prefer the taste of cooked food, just as humans do. It also depends on what you're feeding your dog (is it just mince meats, cooked?).

I've heard the "raw meat makes your dog aggressive" or my favourite "only feed raw meat to a guard dog to make it aggressive", which isn't the case at all.

Raw bones, depending on what kind of bones and in moderation, can be great for your dog (including preventing boredom, natural source of calcium, teeth cleaning, etc). Cooked bones, on the other hand, can cause significant problems and are dangerous to feed.

With either raw or cooked though, its beneficial to do some research and monitor what and how much you are feeding your dog as it can take a bit of time to adjust the portions for your dogs needs.
 

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puppy
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Ultimately the decision between feeding raw and home cooked is a personal one.
Regardless of what one chooses to feed homework should be done. I mean just because a company pays graphic artists a lot of money to create pretty packaging doesn't mean squat.




Home cooked requires more work and more supplementation as cooking destroys a lot of the nutrition in the meats.

Contrary to popular belief the risks bacteria and feeding raw are not nearly as high as many would assume. There is more risk with bacteria feeding kibble compared to feeding human grade meats.

It comes down to education. The biggest issue with most home cookers is the lack of calcium and the addition of too much carb and vegetable into the diet.
Many people assume a fistful of supplements will balance everything out, sadly not everything is bioavailable.

I feed raw because I want to know what I am feeding. I don't cut corners I don't purchase garbage and turn it into food for my dogs. I feed as whole as possible with as much variety as possible.
I personally feed raw after researching it for a long time. I prefer it over cooked food, because as SeiYa mentioned, cooking it destroys some of the significant nutrition that's of benefit to your pet (and admittedly I find raw a lot easier). I like the variety that I can feed my dog and he has a feeding schedule that everyone in my household adheres to. There are some home cooked diets for dogs that are good, but you do need to supplement them with what is taken out once cooked. Admittedly, most dogs will probably prefer the taste of cooked food, just as humans do. It also depends on what you're feeding your dog (is it just mince meats, cooked?).

I've heard the "raw meat makes your dog aggressive" or my favourite "only feed raw meat to a guard dog to make it aggressive", which isn't the case at all.

Raw bones, depending on what kind of bones and in moderation, can be great for your dog (including preventing boredom, natural source of calcium, teeth cleaning, etc). Cooked bones, on the other hand, can cause significant problems and are dangerous to feed.

With either raw or cooked though, its beneficial to do some research and monitor what and how much you are feeding your dog as it can take a bit of time to adjust the portions for your dogs needs.

Are there any reputable sources that you guys might be able to provide? There are so many articles and info out there that can quickly become overwhelming especially when some of the articles contradict others lol. I recently have taken an interest in raw feeding since I have been doing research on kibble and haven't been really all that pleased with my findings. Wade is also only 10 months old so i'm not sure when a good time to start feeding him Raw food would be, but I won't be doing so for awhile until I have all the knowledge and facts I need to do so.

Thank you!
 

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Bazinga!
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There are different types of raw diets out there, the two most common are Prey Model Raw, and Barf. Usually PMR doesn't include veggies, while Barf does.

Here's feeding guide info/transitioning methods for Prey Model Raw, in order to meet NRC nutrient values for dogs you would need to feed a high variety of different raw meats (bone included and boneless) and organs calculated out by the raw feeding spread sheet. Some raw feeders are very much about the numbers and "balance" and some are more lax about it.
http://puppybutt.weebly.com/uploads/7/6/9/2/7692088/beginners_guide_to_prey_model_raw_rv.4.1.pdf

How to get started feeding a Prey Model Raw Diet - Raw Chat - PMR Articles - articles - Prey Model Raw

Vet Surgeon Dr. Tom Lonsdale has a couple good books on feeding raw.
http://www.amazon.com/Raw-Meaty-Bon...351119274&sr=1-2-spell&keywords=Tom+Lonesdale

http://www.amazon.com/Work-Wonders-...351119274&sr=1-1-spell&keywords=Tom+Lonesdale

Dog's Naturally Magazine
Raw Diets For Dogs: Getting Enough Vitamins And Minerals - Dogs Naturally Magazine

How To Make Raw Dog Food

[Updated] How To Balance The Calcium And Phosphorus In Your Dog's Raw Diet - Dogs Naturally Magazine

Balancing The Calcium/Phosphorous Ratio In A Raw Diet For Dogs - Dogs Naturally Magazine

Starting Your Puppy On A Raw Diet | Dogs Naturally Magazine

For Barf, maybe check out Vet Dr. Karen Becker's Raw diet book that includes recipes that have been proven to meet AAFCO and NRC nutritional requirements.
http://www.amazon.com/Beckers-Real-...119206&sr=1-1&keywords=Raw+feeding+Dr.+becker

Or Nutritionist PhD Lew Olson's raw diet book
http://www.amazon.com/Raw-Natural-N...F8&qid=1351118953&sr=8-2&keywords=Raw+feeding
 

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Bazinga!
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Two other books I recommend are kymythy Schultze and Dr. Karen Becker.

You need to read at least two books imho. Yes there is often different advice give the reality is that you can go down the same road differently and yet still reach your destination.

The key is to educate yourself so you are aware you're heading in the right direction. This also allows you to form an opinion on what will and will not work for you and your dog. It also will tell you when the googlers are passing of ****e advise. Anyone can tell you how to do something, you need to be able to tell if the advice is good or bad.
 

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Snuggle Monster
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We took the plunge and went raw about a year ago, I think -- SieYa was tremendously helpful and held my hand through the transition period :) It was a little tricky at first (My boy didn't know how to tear raw meat; he wanted me to hold chicken legs for him like a popsicle while he worked on them. Ewwwwwww!) but I can't imagine ever going back to anything else at this point.

Anyhow, funny little anecdote about the "more aggressive" blood-crazed thing. The other day, we interrupted a hawk's lunch on our hike: there was a fresh, gory prairie dog in the middle of the trail, with its throat ripped open. It was FRESH. I was afraid Silas was going to steal it and run off with it and gobble it down before I could stop him. Nope. He took a good long snuffle, licked it once, looked at me to see if he might be allowed to have it ("nope") and then came right off it.

He also shares the house with a cat and a 3-pound house bunny, and his attitude toward them has not changed in the slightest. And he begs me to sit with him while he works on bones so he can show me his delicious treats and try to share them with me.
 

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Are there any reputable sources that you guys might be able to provide? There are so many articles and info out there that can quickly become overwhelming especially when some of the articles contradict others lol. I recently have taken an interest in raw feeding since I have been doing research on kibble and haven't been really all that pleased with my findings. Wade is also only 10 months old so i'm not sure when a good time to start feeding him Raw food would be, but I won't be doing so for awhile until I have all the knowledge and facts I need to do so.

Thank you!
SieYa provided some great examples. There's no wrong or right time to start feeding your dog raw food -- my current boy was been on a raw diet from about 6 weeks and has done very well on it. Like with any other food, you need to introduce it slowly (don't be upset if he doesn't take to it straight away because it won't necessarily taste or smell as good as his normal food or cooked food). Raw feeding is becoming quite popular now, so there will be a lot more articles and books on it now, which is great, but as you said you will find some contradicting information. You'll find it difficult initially to balance calcium/phosphorus ratios and offal percentage, but you'll get used to it (unless you're extremely confident, I wouldn't give calcium supplements as they can cause more harm to your dog if given in the wrong amounts -- I personally refuse to give any to my dog as the raw diet provides enough calcium as is).

Variety is extremely important. Kaiser gets the following as part of his diet: eggs (raw, scrambled or boiled) coconut oil, e and omega oils, kelp, yoghurt, offal (beef/lamb heart, kidney, liver), beef cuts and mince, beef brisket, lamb flaps, lamb necks, lamb spines, chicken necks, chicken wings, chicken frames, chicken frame mince (makes up his dinner), kangaroo tails, kangaroo mince, venison or rabbit if I can find it, and sardines and salmon. He got different things when he was getting 3-4 meals a day and teething.

You may find, if you choose to give your boy fish, that his poop will be a bit softer on the fish days though haha. Its also a good idea to freeze fresh fish and most other meats before feeding to get rid of any parasites, etc.

You need to be creative at times and adding dog appropriate things you may have had for dinner, such as cooked chicken breast, is also good to add to their food to make it more appealing some days.

I'm not the kind of person to preach feeding raw diets, as its not for every one and not for every dog and there are some kibble foods out there that are great.
 

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Living la Vida Loca!
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I love feeding raw and we are about 6.5 years in. I will never feed another dog of mine kibble unless there was some reason they couldn't eat raw.

I realize raw is not for everyone and you really do need to do your research, get your ratios right, source human grade food and get over being overwhelmed because it is definitely overwhelming at first. Or at least it was for me lol.

I do sometimes cook for Coco but that's only because she likes when her mama does that for her and it's a treat! It's not a regular part of her diet.
 
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