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I have two 4 yr old beautiful black dobbies. I have separated them around the time they went into heat for the first 3yrs. I was not looking for anything but what best for my pups. Now they are four and the past 2 time`s she went into heat, my male tried humping her, she got nasty and then vicious. I then seperated them. I tried it twice as i said just in case it was something else the first time, like she didnt feel good, or was just moody, idk. So my question is; Did i do something wrong by making them wait 3 yrs? Is it too late? And if so, should i just keep them seperated when she is in heat? I have spent time asking, reading, and researching. And you would not believe so of the advice i was given. I figured this would be my best bet. Please only serious replies, I dont want my pups hurting each other becuse i did something wrong. Also, I am not giving my dogs any type of drugs, shot or pill to calm her calm for mating. So please do not even waste your time with that advice. I am not looking to force breed my dobbies, my concern is their safety and puppies would obviously be gift.
 

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u mad?
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Unless your dogs are completely health tested and titled (among other things) nobody here will support the idea of breeding your dogs. There are so many puppies in the world... I would definitely suggest keeping them apart, especially since it's not going well anyways. Why not considering spaying/neutering and just loving the pets that they are? That way you don't have to worry about tiffs and you don't have to work to keep them apart every time your bitch goes into heat.

I suggest you read these.
Reputable breeders for new folks
Interesting breeding quesiton
Before you breed
A good byb?


Edit: Also, why not introduce yourself since you're new. You can do so here.
 

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I should have mentioned that i do have full breeding rights, and i did have all tests by my vet, even had the x-rays for her hips. That was a year ago and the idea of having a litter is so exciting, but i have considered the spaying process also. idk Anyway i am going to look into your suggestions right now and thank you for your reply. I will also go and introduce myself as you requested. I was trying to upload pics but everytime it says there too big. i`ll post all my paperwork there also.
 

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Absolutely not trying to be mean, but have you had both of your dogs health tested? Breeding is the easiest part. If you dont know how to get that done, you sure dont want to be responsible for whelping. So many things can and do go wrong including your bitch aborting, developing life threatening infections, loosing her life during whelping. People that say, let nature take its course, seem to forget all does not go well in nature. Then raising puppies is cute, but there is gobs of poop everywhere, including all over the pups if you dont clean it up as soon as they poo. Puppies are an ungodly mess. They need feeding, worming, shots, tails cut off, on and on and on. It would be best if you spayed and neutered your dogs and left the breeding to people that title and health test their dogs and know what they are doing or have a mentor to walk them thru everything. Just read you said you have had health tests done. Have you had 24 hr holter monitoring, ultra sound, DNA tests of their hearts done?
 

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I should have mentioned that i do have full breeding rights, and i did have all tests by my vet, even had the x-rays for her hips. That was a year ago and the idea of having a litter is so exciting, but i have considered the spaying process also. idk Anyway i am going to look into your suggestions right now and thank you for your reply. I will also go and introduce myself as you requested. I was trying to upload pics but everytime it says there too big. i`ll post all my paperwork there also.
In regards to the part that I bolded, when a member of this forum refers to "health testing", it goes above and beyond a vet visit or simple vet work. This is what is expected of a reputable/ethical breeder:

-DNA test for vWD
-ANNUAL or biannual echocardiogram and 24-hour holter monitor
-annual thyroid test
-OFA hips/elbows
-CERF (eyes) testing
-DNA test for DCM in addition to the holter/echo

Also, a very detailed understanding of your dogs' pedigrees and causes of death/longevity of their ancestors is necessary.

If you are not doing all of these tests, you have no reason to be breeding. No responsible breeder wants a puppy owner to go through the heartache of a dog dying from a disease that could have prevented (for the most part).
 

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Only have a couple of comments you may have not thought about are you willing to take back any pup you bring into this world for its whole life ? All pups should be microchip ed so you can keep tabs on the pups.What if you cannot sell all of the pups ? Have you visited rescues to see how may Doberman s are in the world with no homes. I have had dogs all of my life never once did I breed always fixed my dogs my choice but i thought of all the expense that goes into a litter that you should keep though at least 8 weeks none of this finding homes at 6 weeks.Do you know why you need to keep them the pups with their mom and siblings until at least 8 weeks.You need to learn all this first. Good Luck
 

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also the fact that you rarely ever make money on a litter, if you want to breed the right way you would have your dogs titled in something. BYB is what brings down the quality of the breed and temperament and in the wrong hands causes this breed to have a bad reputation.

I would recommend spay and neutering the lovely Dobermans and if you are still interested in breeding find a local ethical breeder that title's their dogs and ask them questions and see if they will mentor you.
 

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I will go with what others are saying. Actual breeding aside, if BOTH parents aren't fully health tested (heart, vWD, hips, eyes, thyroid), titled in a venue like conformation or SchH then I wouldn't do the breeding at all.

Just because you have full breeding rights doesn't mean they should be bred. There are some very nice breeders in NY, if you are serious about breeding get yourself a mentor to get the health testing and titling. If not with these current dogs, then with the next ones.
 

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Take my Dobe, please!
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Questions to ask before you breed your Dobes are:

What will mating these two specific Dobes accomplish?
What traits do your Dobes possess that will make a positive contribution to the breed?
What positive traits does each Dobe have that will offset the negative ones?

Every breeder needs to look beyond their own dogs, and keep foremost in mind the best interests of the breed. What you allow your Dobes to produce today can have a long-term effect on the quality of the breed in following years. If your breeding only maintains the current quality of your Dobes and does not strive to improve upon their genetics, then you are doing the breed a disservice.

There are a few hundred Dobes in this country that are currently homeless, with many more being abandoned or given up by their owners every week. Dobe-specific rescue groups can take in only so many at a time. As for the rest...their prospects aren't good.

I am fostering a sweet 2.5-year-old red boy, Oliver, who was on death row at a dog pound. He was impounded as a stray and his owners never claimed him. He was neither microchipped nor tattooed, so his breeder could not be traced. No one wanted to adopt him because he has allergies, lick granulomas, and an injury to his back left leg that affects his gait. Had rescuers not stepped in, he would be a rotting carcass in a landfill as I type this.

Where did he come from? Probably from someone who loved their Dobes so much, they wanted to have a pup by them. Someone who then sold him "with full breeding rights" (he was not neutered) to someone who wasn't prepared or willing to meet their commitment to take care of him throughout his lifetime.

Oliver is not the only "deathrow Dobe" I've fostered this year. And he isn't the only one I've pulled from dog pounds, received from owners, or transported to a rescue group or a foster home. And I'm not the only one doing this. And there aren't enough of us doing this--Dobes are dying from lack of foster homes and adopters.

Please read the threads in the "Rescue" forum to get a fuller picture of just how many unwanted Dobes there are right now at risk of being destroyed.

I know you love your Dobes very much. Do you love the Doberman breed? Do you love the breed enough to put aside your love for your dogs and assess their breeding potential--or lack thereof--objectively?

Best wishes for an enlightened future.:wavey:
 

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If your bitch will not stand willingly for a male to be bred, even if you have done all of the health testing that people have listed and even if you know your dogs pedigrees inside out and backwards and even if this would be the breeding of the century (not just because the idea of a litter is exciting to you) your bitch should NOT be bred.

This is abnormal behavior--even bitches who usually will not allow any sort of familiarity from a male will stand if they are in season and the timing is appropriate.

I was helping a long time Dobe breeder with a breeding of a champion bitch years ago--we tried to breed her in two different heat cycles. Even a reluctant bitch shouldn't take much more than a collar and leash and someone to hold her calmly--this bitch was prepared to KILL the male. After the failed attempts in the second season the breeder said--"If she's that determine not to be bred I don't even want her in my breeding program..." She sent her home to her owner and said "Spay her."

That would be my recommendation for your lovely pets. Not every Doberman needs to be bred.

If you really are dying to have a litter you might offer a rescue to foster a pregnant female and whelp the litter for them--there are a number of people who do that regularly.
 
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