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This is my first doberman and I've only had him 5 days. He's not a bad puppy at all, he's very smart, people-oriented and generally docile, I just wasn't prepared for how much of a change it would be. The scratching of the ears and making them bleed is quite stressful, and he whines about anything and everything (very vocal). I knew this breed was a velcro breed and they love to be with people, but since he can't climb stairs he whines when I leave him downstairs, even if I'm just going upstairs to brush my teeth for 5 minutes. Potty training isn't the best either, he'll sit by the door, so I take him out - once I took him out four times in a row, and nothing - and when we got back inside after the 4th time, he peed twice. He chews concrete stairs and his cone, even if we redirect. I'll try to stick it out, as I know this is all just puppy behaviour, and everything will probably be better when his ears heal too, but did anyone else feel like this with their puppy?
 

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Congratulations--it sounds like you have a doberman puppy. And yes, it will pass (some parts of it of it sooner than the others) except for the velcro-ness.

Dog Carnivore Font Working animal Companion dog


Do you use a crate? If you're fairly certain he needs to pee but he doesn't, stick him in the crate (make sure his part of the crate is only as big as his bed so he won't go in the crate) and then try taking him out again in about 10 minutes. You may still have to go in and out a couple of times for one potty, but at least you won't have to worry about your floors before he finally decides to go.
 

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These pups are like our little human babies.
‘They need a daily schedule.
Their bladders are small so they pee more…but that will improve as they mature.
Best thing you can do is start now with training just like any new parents would do….
This is a powerful breed so check out Fenzi online line classes now.
‘Hide and seek games are great.
FYI….you will never physically tire these dogs…..gotta work their brain with games and they will take a nice long nap.
 

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Welcome to the forum from another Canuck. I'm in Ontario. Where are you from?

Puppy hood is hard. Like LadyDi said they are like human babies. They need constant supervision and a lot of care.

Who is your breeder? Have you been able to reach out to them for support?

I had a female for almost 10 years before I got my current boy. I had forgotten how tough puppies were and my boy gave me a run for my money even though I thought I was well prepared.

One thing I found with my boy when he was a pup was that he was a 2 part peer. He would pee outside and then come in and pee again. Once I learned this we stayed outside longer so he could have his 2nd pee also outside.

It's only been 5 days so you are both getting to know each other.

Hang in there. These are the best dogs once they start to mature and we figure out what the need.
 

· Big Lil pup
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"but did anyone else feel like this with their puppy?"

Every time.

In fact, my wife is currently pushing me to hurry up and get a new Doberman puppy. I admit, that I have been putting it off. Mostly for very good reasons. But, if I am going to be totally honest with myself, I must admit that part of it is me subconsciously staving off the inevitable. My dear wife has never had anything at all to do with raising a puppy. Ever. She gets the pleasure and I get the pain.. LOL


BTW... I don't think that I have ever met or heard from a first time Doberman puppy owner who wasn't totally blindsided by the time, effort and patience that is takes to raise them properly. This is especially true of people who have had dogs in the past.

To give you some insight (and a spark of hope), I will once again post a link to member MMcCown's very eye opening first hand experience of Dobe puppy ownership. Although her chronicled journey begins at 10 months, IMO, you should read this from start to finish. If you do, you should be aware that not only was MMc an experienced dog owner, but she was also familiar with working breeds, having owned and raised Boxers.

Check it out: Training - A dance of victory, frustration, and...

JL
 

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You are not alone and it is very much like having a newborn but it will pass. I was alone with my Kona the first week when we got her as my husband and son were up at Moose Camp (hunting) and I thought I was gonna lose my mind LOL. Being several times a night, crate training and then all day making sure to take her out constantly in case she had to pee, I thought I was gonna have a nervous break down and I think I cried a few times and I may have even told her I hated her. It all actually passed by pretty quick and now I can’t imagine life without her she’s absolutely amazing.
 

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Blindsided and punched in the face it felt like!!! I took my pup out every 30mins as long as he was awake and basically slept in increments of 2-3hrs for the first month. I was sleep deprived and exhausted. The couple next door with their newborn looked like a peaceful life while the baby chilled on the blanket and the dad worked on his laptop— meanwhile I was running around letting the pup out every 30min and not having a moment to relax.
The first several months of puppyhood was the most taxing thing I’ve ever done, and he wasn’t even destructive or naughty. Never was nippy; no skin damage. Potty trained in one month. Pretty much only chewed on his things. I could leave him alone in the house by 4-5months of age and he’d just sleep on the couch. AND I took a year break from work so I was able to take care of him all day. Still was f***** exhausting. Can’t imagine taking care of a puppy and working a full time job.
 

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I feel so bad. This is my first doberman and I've only had him 5 days. He's not a bad puppy at all, he's very smart, people-oriented and generally docile, I just wasn't prepared for how much of a change it would be. Haven't had a full night of sleep since before I got him, the scratching of the ears and making them bleed is quite stressful, and he whines about anything and everything (very vocal). I knew this breed was a velcro breed and they love to be with people, but since he can't climb stairs he whines when I leave him downstairs, even if I'm just going upstairs to brush my teeth for 5 minutes. Potty training isn't the best either, he'll sit by the door, so I take him out - once I took him out four times in a row, and nothing - and when we got back inside after the 4th time, he peed twice. He bites when you give him treats, he chews concrete stairs and his cone, even if we redirect. I'll try to stick it out, as I know this is all just puppy behaviour, and everything will probably be better when his ears heal too, but did anyone else feel like this with their puppy?
I've been reading your posts since you brought Cyber home--and as other people have said the first thing I thought was--yup! that's a Dobe puppy.

Bear in mind--this will get better but you need to bear in mind the fact that he is very young and has only been with you for 5 days. This is a puppy who doesn't speak your language, who came to you from the only life he'd ever known which was with his mother and litter mates--he always had company and they all spoke his language.

Someone else already advised you use a crate while potty training and puppies all need to be taken out to pee or poop frequently--before and after every meal, if they've been awake and playing for awhile, every time they wake up from a nap--many of my puppies needed to go out every 20 minutes when they were awake and active--as they got older the time sequences got longer.

The ear situation will get better faster than some of the other things. Overnight will get better too--it won't be too long before he'll be able to sleep 8 hours (which means you can too)

About the biting? There is a sticky "Help! my puppy is biting me"--I hope someone else will give you a link for that--I'm a skilled puppy raiser but a moron about some of the computer things--links are one of the things. I can stop pretty much all biting in two weeks--if a puppy bites me all interaction with the puppy stops--I walk through the nearest door and shut it in his face. Every single time. I open the door and rejoin in in only a a minute--puppies forget fast what they've done. If he's still being inclined to bite after that I put him in his crate--more often that not if I go back three or four minutes later--he's sound asleep--like toddlers their off switches aren't fully developed--puppies are always looking for attention--to get it from their litter mates they'd bite them--if they bit too hard the litter mate would go away and refuse to play. I say nothing to the puppy about it--I let my actions and his speak for themselves. As for biting when you give treats--I open my hand and lay the treat on it and say "easy"--if they aren't trying to grab a treat out of your fingers they are less likely to bite.

You'll probably find more things that drive you crazy and you and the puppy will work through them one by one.

I think one of the things I once read here about the new puppy whose owner was explaining to the puppy about training because of his bad behavior was classic. She said "And this is why your daddy drinks and your mummy cries..."

It made me laugh but it does all blow over--he'll grow up and that alone will stop a lot of the stuff that wears you out and drives you crazy--and just plain getting older will take care of some of it.

Take a deep breath--if you can stick it out for a few months you'll find thing improve quickly.

dobebug
 

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Thanks for the mention, @4x4bike ped !
The experts are correct, it will all blow over BUT you must be fair, consistent, and kind - basically do everything that the above replies have told you.

My boy’s puppyhood was a huge challenge. For all the amazing things he could do, there were practical things with which we couldn’t make progress.

All I can tell you is that the puppy didn’t choose you, you chose him and it is up to you to give him the best life possible. I am amazed at the amount of work Dobermans take but I can state 100% that, 2 years on, I would not change a single thing.

If you decide to keep him, you are in the right place for advice, empathy, sympathy, and instruction.
 

· Big Lil pup
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"and just plain getting older will take care of some of it."

Yeh... Right... True enough.... And then they enter those oh so cooperative and mellow teenage months.

Says the previously increasingly obedient pup to very, very unhappy human: "Sit? Stay? Come? Didn't you get the memo? I am sooooo over that stuff." "Oh... BTW.... That wasn't me that____________. (Fill in the bank)

JL
 

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Another tip for housebreaking is to keep good treats on you and treat immediately as soon as they go outside - use a potty word for them consistently every time also. It takes time for the lightbulb to go off but it will.
 

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Hey Maya -

I hear you on how hard puppies are. Take a deep breath! I hope you have a good breeder you can lean on for some support?

I have a 3 month old pup, so I'm right there with you on being sleep deprived, and I'm in the midst of potty training and all of it. Since Leon is my fifth Doberman, I can tell you with confidence that it does get better, but raising a puppy - any puppy - is hard. If you want to do it, you can!

Right now, your crate, an x-pen, and good chews are your friend. I have two crates and an x-pen set up for Leon. We are doing our best to have a schedule for him so he gets used to things. I saw your other thread. Leon also came home on Inukshuk and I didn't change anything for a while. I added a bit of water and a probiotic to his food. I would be sure your pup's cone is off for meal times. It can help to feed in the crate, both for crate training and to minimize distraction.

Sometimes puppies need to go really often! Depending on how much water he might have had, or how active he's been...we might need to go out 15 or 20 minutes after we were just out. Leon doesn't really have any freedom right now. He's either in his x-pen, or gated in the room with my eyes on him constantly, or he's in a crate. If he's "out" in the room, he pretty much goes outside ever 20-30 minutes. I try hard not to give him a chance to make a potty training mistake. If he doesn't go, we go back out pretty soon after. If I really think he needs to pee, I'd probably stay out long enough that he does go. You might need to put him on a leash if he's distracted outside.

The biting...yep. You've gotten some advice already, but I've found the biting is the worst when Leon is overtired and needs a nap. Also, I offer him lots of chews. We do a lot of bully sticks, we do chews from Farm Hounds - the beef hide rolls, we do some beef cheeks... the more things he has that he likes to chew, the less likely he is to bite. It's worth the money! You can also buy some things like Toppls and stuff them. It's really a good idea to offer him something to chew in his crate when you leave him alone to go upstairs, even for a few minutes. That will help with the whining.

What else? Happy to brainstorm with you.
 

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Oh, one more thing - many people don't realize how much sleep puppies need. Puppies need something like 16 hours of sleep a day. So too many people don't get their puppy enough sleep and you end up with a pup who is very sleep deprived, and is then much like an over tired toddler all the time. It's not good for them. I can link you some research if you'd like.
 

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Oh, I think one of the reasons why my pup was never a biter, for real (except sometimes chasing pants) is that he received a frozen meaty bone almost every single day until he finished teething. He was too busy chewing to bite us, and the coldness must’ve been a relief to his sore teething gums. Keeping that chew drive satiated helps tremendously.
 

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meanwhile I was running around letting the pup out every 30min and not having a moment to relax.
Yeah, but you aren't changing diapers and getting spit on umpty times a day.

The puppies I raised when I was working full time just didn't get the same kind of attention the ones I raised after retirement did. No outside every 30 minutes, but staying in a small puppy-proofed room with a friend stopping by at the 4-hour mark to let puppy out and play with her a bit. Floor was covered with newspapers, which tells you how long ago that was as I haven't the foggiest where you could get enough newspapers to use that way these days.

Those from-the-good-old-days puppies learned that whining over being left alone was a waste of energy much quicker than the retirement ones, but they weren't housebroken as quickly.
 
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