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Hi all!

I have an 11-week old, male named Ace. We have had him a week now and he seems to be getting used to us quite well. I have been working on him with the sit command and he is doing well. Would you share what method/how you are training your pup please? I am not sure what is too fast. Should I only introduce one new command every couple of days? Also what are the most appropriate treats? I don't want him becoming fat, but want him excited about the treats/training.

We put him in his crate, only at night time. How are you crate training?

Thanks so much!!!
 

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With crate training, unless you are watching the pup 100%, he should be crated, in an xpen (or gated off area like the kitchen) This will help with potty training, not chewing on things he is not supposed to, and help avoid seperation anxiety later on. He needs to learn that being alone is okay.
I would never let a pup have free range of the house until he is 100% house trained (potty and chewing). So probably not until almost a year old or even older. Either crated/xpen or on a leash attached to you. This IMO is why people have so many problems with house training and destructive chewing. If your dog never has a chance to soil the rug, chew the couch, table legs, eat your underwear, your shoe, the tv remote, as a pup, he will never realize how fun it is.

I only give single ingredient treats, dehydrated liver, chicken jerky, etc and TINY treats, break them up into tiny pieces, if he has to chew it, its too big.

Keep training sessions short, 10-15 minutes max. If the pup loses interest stop. You want training sessions to be positive. Google positive reinforcement.

I am a fan of Leerburg, they have many free articles about training (I may not agree with all of their methods like, they dont like strangers petting their dogs, but it is very good)
Leerburg Dog Training | Articles

I also like the book The Focused Puppy
Leerburg | The Focused Puppy

Here's another website
ClickerSolutions Training Articles Contents

I had no problems introducing multiple commands. Just go on how fast he learns. If he isnt getting it, move on to something else.
My pup learned sit, down, stay, shake, crawl, get your toy, bed, in the first few weeks.
Stay, speak, roll over, on your side didnt come until a few months later.
 

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I totally agree with Hank. Short training sessions with very positive focus, integrate lots of play into it too and make it lots of fun for the puppy.

I have an 11 week old pup and in the 2 weeks since she came home we have worked on things like sit, down, stand, front, left spin, right spin, back-up, rear-end awareness exercises, attention / focus on me, and recalls. I've also been doing some basic foundation agility stuff like circle work and getting her used to working on both my left and right side. Most times I am using a clicker or else marking with "yes" and I frequently take quick breaks to play tug while we are training. Length of time is usually 10 min or so and I usually have a few little training sessions each day. I also try to find opportunities to work on things ad hoc - like I will call her when I am confident she will come and reward her heavily for that.

As far as crating, our puppy is crated at night, whenever we leave the house and she doesn't come with us, and I also have an X-pen in our family room and I put her in there when I can't watch her closely, when she is worn out and could use a nap, or when our older dog needs a break from her. ;)

In addition to the books Hank provided links to, you may also want to check out "The Power Of Positive Dog Training" by Pat Miller.

The Power of Positive Dog Training: Pat Miller: 9780470241844: Amazon.com: Books

For treats, I typically use tiny bits of cut up cheese, hot dogs, boiled chicken breasts, and also the Natural Balance food rolls that can be easily broken into small pieces.

Good luck with your puppy!
 

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I focused on every day life at first. I do have my puppies in puppy class and we do some training. But mostly we focus on socializing, manners, getting used to crates. I use positive reinforcement/clicker training.
 

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I'm getting my pup in about 3 weeks so I also have questions on crate training -hope you don't mind me jumping in on this thread:

Most of the crate training advice has 3 scenarios: puppy is in the crate in the house, or out the crate in the house, or being handled in the house. Only playing and potty happens outside the house. We have a big garden where the dog will ultimately spend his time if there is nobody in the house (at night he will sleep in the crate in the house and he will be in the house with us when we are in the house, crated or un-crated depending on where we are with housebreaking). I understand while he's little his space should be smaller but how do I apply crate training rules to areas in the garden/yard? For example, if we go out for the morning and he is 12 weeks old and needs to be left at home, I think I will put him in a restricted area in the yard with his crate which will be open for him to use. This breaks the rule of him being out of his crate unsupervised. If he potties in that area (and I clean up as soon as I get in) is it a problem?
 

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I would not leave a puppy unsupervised in the yard. He's too young and can learn many bad habits and to puppies a lot of scary things can happen in the yard and when those happen I want to be there to work with puppy to show them say the lawnmower isn't scary or the garbage trucks or the neighbors barking dogs, etc.
 

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your gonna get you head ripped off here at DT for saying you would leave the pup in the yard unattended. personally i know you probually have a special fenced in area that there is no way he could get out. But you not being there means the puppy has the opportunity to act like a fool if he wants too. which will only lead to bad behavior in the long run. I would crate him when your not home. It will make him a calmer dog in the long run.
 

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I'm similar to Adara. Right now with Richter we are focusing on manners and socialization. I am introducing some commands, like sit, but I'm much more concerned about getting him out in the world and making sure he's comfortable with all sorts of stuff.

I really like Leslie McDevitt's new "Control Unleashed Puppy" book for all puppies. It's pretty awesome. I clicker train. I also love "Puppy Start Right" (Puppy Start Right: Foundation Training for the Companion Dog: Kenneth Martin, Debbie Martin: Amazon.com: Kindle Store). Great foundation stuff.

Richter will be going to class reasonably soon, but I don't think it's as important as the other stuff.
 

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^^^^ +1

I have a 10 week old puppy & practice house manners + socialization first (many - people / noises / places / things / etc.).
Learning to play with toys and not chew household items...therefore manner work, learning to control directional movements outside and settle down (when needed) via. voice pitch and body language through love & building bond first...is what I focus on ahead of learning command / any tricks. Early foundation, sets up the pup for success, for its entire life.

By being creative, you can teach the puppy for example to fetch toys, even before it knows its being trained...through just playing around together...and this is when the mutual fun, becomes your biggest advantage...and natural learning together & behavior expectations are formed...with rules & boundaries.
 

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I tend to spend more time doing manners, and general behaviors, as opposed to teaching tricks and whatnots. But there's no reason why you can't start working on a bunch of things right away, like sit, down, drop, leave, stay, etc. Just make sure to vary things up, so that your dog is learning, as opposed to predicting order. What methods and techniques you use should really depend on the dog, I prefer to use things like positive reinforcement, negative punishment, free-shaping, luring, marker training, that kinda stuff.
 

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All training should be a party with a wee pup like this. It's all a game, and that's as it should be.

There is no way on the planet I would leave a puppy unsupervised in a yard of any size. Gracie is now a little over 1 1/2 years and we still do not leave her unsupervised outside. The potential for injury, damage, loss are beyond belief. The vet bill to have the stick or rock removed from inside the dog, if the dog survives it. The dog that digs out. The dog that is stolen. The dog that simply digs and then licks the dirt off its feet obessively (because it is unattended and unstimulated). I will simply not address the inhumanity of leaving a dog outside when it is cold or hot.

If you must leave your pup, it ought be crated inside the house, unless and until it is old enough to be trusted alone in the house uncrated.
 
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