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Hello all,

I am searching for a reputable European Doberman breeder on the east coast. I live just outside of Richmond, Virginia and do not mind traveling. I am currently on a wait list but it is quite lengthy, as I'm sure many are. If there are any that you are aware of, please let me know.
 

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Hello all,

I am searching for a reputable European Doberman breeder on the east coast. I live just outside of Richmond, Virginia and do not mind traveling. I am currently on a wait list but it is quite lengthy, as I'm sure many are. If there are any that you are aware of, please let me know.
European showlines or working lines?
 

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Honestly either. I am looking for a dog with a high drive, energetic, and willing to work but still will serve as a pet.
 

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What is it that you are planning on doing with your Doberman? A true working line is a lot of dog for most people. They truly need a job!
 

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Hello all,

I am searching for a reputable European Doberman breeder on the east coast. I live just outside of Richmond, Virginia and do not mind traveling. I am currently on a wait list but it is quite lengthy, as I'm sure many are. If there are any that you are aware of, please let me know.
Offer twice the price and see what happens to your place on that list.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What is it that you are planning on doing with your Doberman? A true working line is a lot of dog for most people. They truly need a job!
I figured that was the case. And other than training at to be a personal protection dog, there won’t be much else that he does for a job so a show line is more suitable.
 

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Offer twice the price and see what happens to your place on that list.
I can honestly say many of the breeders I've known would be weirded out by this, and likely wouldn't want to work with you.
 

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Not sure what planet you live on where more money does not get you better treatment.
For some people, their puppies are not a commodity, and that kind of offer is very distasteful. If I were a breeder, that would be a big turnoff for me. Mileage may vary, of course, but...I know a lot of reputable breeders, and I can't think of any of them that would react well to that kind of offer. They want their puppies in the best home, the one that is best suited to them. And trying to "jump the line" when people have patiently waited on a list, but are also GOOD homes that are well suited to those pups...that wouldn't sit well with them. Generally, being willing to wait for a puppy instead of having the attitude of "I have to have it now" is something a good breeder looks for.
 

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Not sure what planet you live on where more money does not get you better treatment.
Fact is, ethical breeders care quite a bit about their puppies and where they go. Throwing extra money around makes the individual seem demanding and boastful, and may not be the best home for their dogs.

Money talks. It doesn't always say what you want it to say.
 

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They want their puppies in the best home, the one that is best suited to them.
'

Which is the better 'home' - The one than can afford twice as much with zero issues or the one that can't?

Who would sell a puppy to someone that can't afford to even 'care' for it?

Who would not give preference to the potential owner that COULD provide that care?
 

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'

Which is the better 'home' - The one than can afford twice as much with zero issues or the one that can't?

Who would sell a puppy to someone that can't afford to even 'care' for it?

Who would not give preference to the potential owner that COULD provide that care?
Ah, but it isn't that simple. I know plenty of people who have "less" money who go to the ends of the earth for their dogs, who will spend utterly anything for their care, who provide all kinds of enrichment, who have dogs who live incredible lives, who never lack for vet care, training, etc. And yet, I also know wealthy people (who might spend a lot on the "purchase price") who have dogs who do not live that kind of life at all. Dogs maybe get walked, really exist as "lawn ornaments", never get training classes, and when push comes to shove with a big vet bill, the dogs really don't matter that much to them, because "it's just a dog." Income certainly does NOT equate to a good life for a dog. Many many MANY people with lower incomes provide wonderful lives for their dogs.
 

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What's the saying? Oh yeah... "Money can't buy class."

I remember several years ago, someone here mentioned that a person who trained at their bitesport club paid upwards of $10,000 to purchase and import a dog from Europe, only to turn it over to a rescue in less than six months.
 

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MC and Rosemary hit the nail on the head.

Money isn't the only thing a breeder cares about. They care FAR more about quality of care. An individual throwing money at a breeder to get "first pick" just because they didn't want to wait speaks volumes about their willingness to stick around when things get hard in 6 months (and again, later when the dog's a senior). CAN spend the money and WILL spend the money are often vastly different things.

I had a chat with an individual who drove a Maserati, wore expensive bespoke suits, and had a 6 year old dog he got bored with and dumped (on the side of the road), then turned around and bought a puppy from one of the puppy mills in PA the next day. The reason for the boredom? The dog got sick and he didn't feel like taking care of it. He clearly had the money, just didn't care, because like everything else in his life a dog is disposable.

Conversely, I have friends who work in retail and food service, making minimum wage or below, but literally bend over backwards for their dogs, to the point of going hungry so their dogs could be fed while they were not working due to the pandemic shutting their jobs.

Quality of care matters. Quality of person matters. The way one presents oneself matters. To ethical breeders, this isn't a livelihood - it's a labor of love. This is why they have applications...this is why they'll have LOTS of questions for prospective buyers. This is why they'll want references.
 

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Not sure what planet you live on where more money does not get you better treatment.
As a breeder, if you offered me double the price to be moved up on a list I'd likely take you off my list. As mentioned, they are not a commodity that you can just buy because you have lots of money, likely meaning, that you will also try to disperse of them the same way.

Honestly, this is so incredibly offensive to my morals, standards and everything I believe in it's ridiculous!
 

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Ah, but it isn't that simple. I know plenty of people who have "less" money who go to the ends of the earth for their dogs, who will spend utterly anything for their care, who provide all kinds of enrichment, who have dogs who live incredible lives, who never lack for vet care, training, etc. And yet, I also know wealthy people (who might spend a lot on the "purchase price") who have dogs who do not live that kind of life at all. Dogs maybe get walked, really exist as "lawn ornaments", never get training classes, and when push comes to shove with a big vet bill, the dogs really don't matter that much to them, because "it's just a dog." Income certainly does NOT equate to a good life for a dog. Many many MANY people with lower incomes provide wonderful lives for their dogs.
I get what you are saying but still. Just as you seem to know people with money that do not take care of their dogs - I know plenty of people with money that do. If their fido swallows a bottlecap and needs an expensive surgery to remove it - That expense is not a blip on their radar.

Same surgery may be impossible for someone without the same resources.

Agree that income does not 'guarantee' that a dog will be 'properly cared for' but with little or no income the odds are stacked against the owner if any sort of emergency arises.
 

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I get what you are saying but still. Just as you seem to know people with money that do not take care of their dogs - I know plenty of people with money that do. If their fido swallows a bottlecap and needs an expensive surgery to remove it - That expense is not a blip on their radar.

Same surgery may be impossible for someone without the same resources.

Agree that income does not 'guarantee' that a dog will be 'properly cared for' but with little or no income the odds are stacked against the owner if any sort of emergency arises.
I don't agree--I've owned and shown Dobermans on a shoe string since my first (1959) and I've found ways to pay for expensive surgeries (one of them had the desired side effect of enabling me to quit smoking because I couldn't afford that and the surgery.) And I've gotten some very nice dogs because breeders knew that if I said I'd show, I'd show and I knew how to raise show prospects, keep them in good health and show them.

And they knew I wouldn't go and neuter or spay a hot prospect because I didn't want to deal with the realities of intact dogs.

And I know an awful lot of the better breeders who regularly let some really wonderful dogs go to pet homes because those owners had a track record of being really good owners.

Just sayin'

dobebug
 

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If I offered twice the amount for a dog and the breeder took that, I'd actually be concerned about the breeder. To me, it would be a huge red flag and I'd think they are not a breeder, but a greeder. They are not in for the betterment for the breed but for the betterment of their wallet. That's someone I wouldn't want to deal with because they most likely don't give a flying fudge about the health of their animal. Once the money is in their hands, they drop off the face of the earth and even though you might have the money to cover vet bills and everything else, you still would be left with a very unhealthy dog or even worse, a dog that dies at a young age.

Sure, this is a rather unhealthy breed to begin with but I rather would at least try to stack the odds a little better in my favor and go with someone who will stand by their dog. Any responsible breeder puts time, effort, blood, sweat, tears, and, yes, money in their dogs but they are not just a product. The puppy is the breeder's life's work.
 

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Not sure what planet you live on where more money does not get you better treatment.
13 years ago I was offered $20,000 for one of my puppies if I would hold on to him for quarantine and then ship to a far east country. I said no - that I couldn't even sell one to the west coast of this country, and would never sell one to a location that I could not go and get them if needed. So I guarantee to you that truly reputable breeders care most about what is best for the puppy and money is NOT the big motivator.
 
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