Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner
21 - 38 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
403 Posts
Loki and Bella, especially Loki must down stay and wait for release word> "ok" (yes he knows the difference between ok and Loki) to get their food. I always pet Loki, straighten his ears and then walk away. i can take his bowl at any time but do not do this except very occasionally. We give them raw beef back bones and they relinquish to us when asked.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,142 Posts
Oh my children and pets.
What I think is important is teaching our human kids the basics rules of being around pets.
Young children tend to think they can interact with all dogs the same way they interact with their dogs at home.
That can cause a negative event if visiting someone elses dog.
So first good to teach the basics and follow the same rules ourselves.
Then later as we all become more established with our dogs habits we can bend those rules a bit.
But just like with our dog training our little humans must also be taught the basic foundation of pet manners.
Some dog training schools actually sponsor children classes which teaches the basics for pet ownership.
So many children get bitten each year by our pets.
There are many great videos for children in this area.
Ones that teach children of the warning signs are fantastic.
So many children stare at dogs having no idea what they are communicating to the dog.
Some call that staring …targeting. Enough to ruffle a strange dogs hackles.
Kids need to learn the basics signs that a dog is not happy with them….
My grandkids and I play a game where I ask the kids “What do you think he is thinking?“ Do you think he is happy ? Do you think he is dis-appointed? Every moment of each day provides an opportunity for teaching. So show your kids all the different responses and the best way to handle the situation.
kids learn so fast once they are shown things first hand. Plus its a fun game.
And then the little humans love to hug and kiss there dogs.
But maybe not a good idea until much later once the relationship is established.

Here is a decent read but there are many more out there that read the same:

https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/kids-and-dogs-how-kids-should-and-should-not-interact-with-dogs/
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,832 Posts
My grandkids and I play a game where I ask the kids “What do you think he is thinking?“ Do you think he is happy ? Do you think he is dis-appointed? Every moment of each day provides an opportunity for teaching. So show your kids all the different responses and the best way to handle the situation.
kids learn so fast once they are shown things first hand.
This is so smart, Di! I love that you are teaching your grandkids how to read dog body language.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,142 Posts
When I was a little kid I always was going after animals….dogs and cats roamed free in our neighborhoods.
No leash laws back back then !!!!!
I will never forget the time I got bit by our neighbors cat. I was in second grade maybe and was playing outside alone.
My Mother had warned me many times about strange animals.
But I decided to mess with the cat when no one was around.
So yep the cat bit me in my thumb. Little puncture wound And even had to get a shot!
Well..the day this happened Mama called regarding the stray cat and a firemen came to our house.
. This kind fireman went with me and we found the cat that bit me.
This fireman took the time to talk to me real kindly about the stray cat.
We crouched down together and the fireman instructed me to notice the way the cat was looking at us with narrow eyes. He also showed me how the cat was hunkered down in the grass. Along with not looking very interested in being petted …the fireman said now look at his tail. See the very end of the tail just slightly moving…just the very tip of the tail.
So then he asked me …what do you think? Is he interested in playing with you ? Of course I advised him no….but I always remember that fireman and the cats narrow eyes and the tip of his tail slowly moving.
Cats rule ! LOL
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,413 Posts
It’s the start of control. If you cant stop your dog in mid eating. Sit stay till released you have zero control puppy will not take your hand off

I can give a dog a bone take it away. Or just drop it and give it back to them

Growling at a human is NOT allowed in this house period learnt in puppy stage is a must. Way before 6 months

I’ve been owner of other peoples rejects all my life. They all have been my best dog till the next one comes along
I can give any of my Dobes a bone and take it away or anything else of value. My dogs don't growl at me about anything but I also allow them to eat without my hand in their face or food bowl--I think that's kind of a stupid way to teach control.

dobebug
 

·
Got mutt?
Leo, Lily, and Simon
Joined
·
14,230 Posts
Wow I have always messed with my dogs when their eating. Cover dish with a hand pet, poked cover dish move it with my foot. So much as a little growl food is gone for the day
You pester the heck out of me by messing with my plate while I'm eating, and I'm liable to growl at you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I will check it out for sure . Yes this puppy loves to bite that’s why we all try and keep a toy in hand lol . Thank you !
Please oversee when the toy is being used by your children if that in fact is what is occurring lest an opening up a possible 'Pandora's box' over resource/toy guarding especially if accompanied by a growl if the toy is inadvertently removed.

A growl can appear as a double edged sword in the sense that it cuts two ways — meaning the importance to differentiate between a playful growl during play where body language signals play versus a growl accompanied by rigid body posture over a resource/toy etc.

Without appearing to be an over reactive alarmist, the razor-sharp frontal incisor 'baby' teeth at the dispensing end of a 30 pound 13 1/2 week old Doberman pup can dispense a suture resulting wound in a heartbeat especially to the delicate hand of a child. Therefore I politely revert back to please oversee ALL activity during this tentative period where the children are engaged with the pup.

I echo the sentiments by the moderator and the consensus of opinion contained within those like-minded posts. Will the behavior surface again? If so then a behaviorist should be consulted. As always it is best to be proactive (as you are showing) at this formative stage of puppy behavioral development.
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Haha let's just say I am ;). I can certainly say different breeds means different training methods.

Had another one to put in with your training is a self calming/controling exercise. This one will actually help the puppy learn to self calm and as well as not be so food aggressive. You have him lay down and just out of reach is a small pile of his kibble or whatever motivates him for treats. Then with him staying in place take a couple and place between his front legs within range to eat, if he gets up going for the jackpot just cover with your hand and put him back into place. He'll soon get if he just stays in place he will get them all eventually and you as positive when eating!

In some time, just like regular feedings have the kids also do that. Piles more out there to help, but something to keep in mind is literally everything your doing with this puppy or even around this puppy is training!
Yes that’s for sure . I have owned Yorkies for years and this is our first big breed . They are definitely super smart !

that’s a great idea I will also done that a try . The kids already help with basic training And they love it :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Oh my children and pets.
What I think is important is teaching our human kids the basics rules of being around pets.
Young children tend to think they can interact with all dogs the same way they interact with their dogs at home.
That can cause a negative event if visiting someone elses dog.
So first good to teach the basics and follow the same rules ourselves.
Then later as we all become more established with our dogs habits we can bend those rules a bit.
But just like with our dog training our little humans must also be taught the basic foundation of pet manners.
Some dog training schools actually sponsor children classes which teaches the basics for pet ownership.
So many children get bitten each year by our pets.
There are many great videos for children in this area.
Ones that teach children of the warning signs are fantastic.
So many children stare at dogs having no idea what they are communicating to the dog.
Some call that staring …targeting. Enough to ruffle a strange dogs hackles.
Kids need to learn the basics signs that a dog is not happy with them….
My grandkids and I play a game where I ask the kids “What do you think he is thinking?“ Do you think he is happy ? Do you think he is dis-appointed? Every moment of each day provides an opportunity for teaching. So show your kids all the different responses and the best way to handle the situation.
kids learn so fast once they are shown things first hand. Plus its a fun game.
And then the little humans love to hug and kiss there dogs.
But maybe not a good idea until much later once the relationship is established.

Here is a decent read but there are many more out there that read the same:

https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/kids-and-dogs-how-kids-should-and-should-not-interact-with-dogs/
Thats a really great idea I will definitely rid this article and try to take it into practice ! I want my children to learn how to respect our pets ❤
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Please oversee when the toy is being used by your children if that in fact is what is occurring lest an opening up a possible 'Pandora's box' over resource/toy guarding especially if accompanied by a growl if the toy is inadvertently removed.

A growl can appear as a double edged sword in the sense that it cuts two ways — meaning the importance to differentiate between a playful growl during play where body language signals play versus a growl accompanied by rigid body posture over a resource/toy etc.

Without appearing to be an over reactive alarmist, the razor-sharp frontal incisor 'baby' teeth at the dispensing end of a 30 pound 13 1/2 week old Doberman pup can dispense a suture resulting wound in a heartbeat especially to the delicate hand of a child. Therefore I politely revert back to please oversee ALL activity during this tentative period where the children are engaged with the pup.

I echo the sentiments by the moderator and the consensus of opinion contained within those like-minded posts. Will the behavior surface again? If so then a behaviorist should be consulted. As always it is best to be proactive (as you are showing) at this formative stage of puppy behavioral development.
Mike
So far with toys he’s great he’s not possessive and he loves when the kids play with him . The reason I tell the kids to always to have a toy is because if he feels like he want to relieve some of his teething he will do so with his toys not the kids hands . He has come a long way and is understanding what no means. We train with him daily and make sure we also give him plenty exercise and mental stimulation
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
So far with toys he’s great he’s not possessive and he loves when the kids play with him . The reason I tell the kids to always to have a toy is because if he feels like he want to relieve some of his teething he will do so with his toys not the kids hands . He has come a long way and is understanding what no means. We train with him daily and make sure we also give him plenty exercise and mental stimulation
Libere: Good to read of that additional update and thank you for clarifying for me that my alarmist over reach wasn't warranted as toy and play are not an issue. My response was based on a 'leave no stone unturned' when responding to sight unseen behavioral issues on an internet forum.

Please allow me to provide one small — at times meaningless yet very useful when appropriate — 'tip' regarding the play with toys. Your pup's want to bite toys is indicative of a Doberman's innate genetic makeup of prey drive and no it is not a danger in the context you present — conversely prey drive is beneficial when tapped into and channeled towards obedience. In more understandable terms then the bite toys become high value rewards for Obedience Compliance.

Meaning what? A clear example is when a pup decides to play 'keep away' —(as often the case with a toy/prey driven dog) — with a toy especially a squeaky toy (i.e. mock prey). A seeming inadvertent conditioning of the pup to out is attained by presenting a second toy/ball etc — known as opposition reflex — and upon releasing the initial toy the second toy is the reward for an inadvertent compliance to the command to out. The following link by Robert Cabral provides clarity of what words seem to muddle. As your pup develops through adolescence and into adulthood then the contents of the video might be worth putting onto the 'back burner' of requisites for future reference. Malinois (as in the video) and Dobermans as do many working breeds share this 'Prey Drive'.
How to End a Tug Game with Your Dog - Dog Training Video - YouTube
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Great to hear about the toys! The trade technique is excellent, and another to make sure he always wants to share his toys is to make it more fun with you than alone. Such as little tug, flip the toy around etc. etc. Also, word of caution is to ensure any of his toys don't resemble small breeds such as the Yorkie, so any fur-like stuffies should be removed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Great to hear about the toys! The trade technique is excellent, and another to make sure he always wants to share his toys is to make it more fun with you than alone. Such as little tug, flip the toy around etc. etc. Also, word of caution is to ensure any of his toys don't resemble small breeds such as the Yorkie, so any fur-like stuffies should be removed.
yes we can ask forhis toys and he will share them. And yes I have 2 Yorkie and I make sure no toys resemble them . Thank you !
 
21 - 38 of 38 Posts
Top