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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,
Completely new Dobermann owner here, have had many different dogs but first time with this breed so very excited!
I have done lots and lots of research but it can be a bit overwhelming at times
My puppy is due to arrive in just over a week and he will be coming just under 4 months old.
What do you think are the biggest priorities in terms of training/items for his first day and week with us at his new home?
We have a toddler and to prevent his first day being overwhelming I have made arrangements for her to stay with family just for the first day so that the house is quiet and calm for when the puppy arrives, as anyone with young kids knows this is near impossible on a normal day!
I have also heard socialisation is extremely important from the get-go so will be signing up to classes and such now.
He is coming crate trained but nothing else.

Any suggestions would be really appreciated!
 

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Puppies and toddlers aren't often a good match. Puppies see little kids as puppies and try to play with them as they've played with their litter mates. So I'd be setting up an x-pen and unless you are absolutely THERE the puppy and the kidlet shouldn't be allowed to interact--nips and bruises from a puppy who will soon weigh more than the kid need to be avoided.

I've had friends who put the kid in the x-pen as often as they put the puppy in the x-pen--but that's a whatever works for you and your family. And house training. Those really need to go on at the same time.

The rest of the training and socialization can go on as it can be worked into a schedule that has training for the puppy and child about how to interact with each other will allow.

Fortunately both toddlers and puppies grow and the interactions get less problematic as time goes on.

They'll probably end up being the best of friends. One of he members here John has lots of experience with puppies and his grandchildren. He can give you more insight than I can. And congratulations on your new family member soon to arrive.

dobebug
 

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Hi Jay and welcome from the Pacific NW.

So... everything that dobebug said (with emphasis! LOL)

My son brought their new Dobe puppy home at almost 12 weeks to an already established Doberman household that also had a toddler and a 4 yo. They had a bit of a leg up in that both children were born and, raised around Dobes. Even at their young age, they totally understand how to act and behave around these dogs. It is second nature to them. This is my son's 3rd dobe and he himself was born into a home with both a Dobe and a Boxer.

That being said, extraordinary measures were still taken to insure a safe and healthy environment was provided for both the pup and the dogs. The boys have always had pretty much unlimited and mostly unsupervised interactions with my Doberman and my son's recently deceased senior boy. So rules and regulations regarding Popeye (the puppy) were novel to them. Mandatory separation when not strictly supervised was new. In the end, however, nothing works perfectly and the kids did end up with a few very minor bruises, scratches and bites. So that's something that may need to be expected. The one extremely important thing that both boys had to learn immediately is that they were NEVER to lay a hand on the puppy. Regardless of what happened they could not hit, kick or throw things at him. Unfortunately, this is sometimes an instinctual response by a very young child to a willful puppy when child become frustrated.

So fast forward to today. The younger child's now 2 yo and his older brother will be 5 yo in a few weeks. Popeye is now 7 months and the 3 of them get along wonderfully. He is totally out of his "Dobershark" phase. The pup sleeps crated in their room. The older boy is working on command and obedience compliance with him and can successfully walk him on a leash. He does have an advantage in that he has been practicing commands with my adult male, pretty much all of his little life. And he has become good at it. In a controlled environment he has close to 100% recall compliance. That is something that many adult dog owners never accomplish.

So... Baby steps. Literally! Everything is introduced slowly. For example: As of last week, my older grandson is teaching his little brother how to feed my dog. This is something that he has done from about the same age of 2. It is a fairly complicated procedure that requires the dog be completely obedient during everything from prep to cleanup.

One last thing... Both Popeye and the grandkids spend a lot of time at our house. So, even as well as the pup is coming along I alway have a 4 foot leash with me so the (not so little) terror can be tethered at a moments notice. Lately this happens more when my McCoy looks like he is about to revoke Popeye's "Puppy Pass". LOL

Come back on with any questions. This introductory, maturing and learning period passes very quickly. So make the most of it using calm. gentle and positive interactions and techniques. The effort that you put in over the next few months will benefit your family for a lifetime. And, if your family is anything like my, the effects will be multigenerational.

John Lichtwardt
Portland OR

Edit to say: I have a simple routine that I added to McCoy's little life when he first came home 6 1/2 years ago, that I am convinced aided him in becoming the most socialized dog that I have ever known. But right now, I am all typed out.

Later!

J.
 

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My advice it to take the above recommendations to heart, you have a loyal/protector family dog in the making and it is completely up to you to ensure that happens. Patience, don't get frustrated, and some some serious time investment.

My puppy is now coming on to 11 weeks, and everyday is a training session along with reinforcing what he already knows. He can get very determined and you can actually see him considering whether to obey or not! I'll get him there... but so you know they're all different. My 1st Dobie I was really lucky... he was so intelligent & disciplined even a then rookie like me got him to 100% recall even if attacking/chasing. So, learn the little guy's traits and try to adapt those into your training. You want to nourish/encourage some of those traits. Good luck!

140108
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Puppies and toddlers aren't often a good match. Puppies see little kids as puppies and try to play with them as they've played with their litter mates. So I'd be setting up an x-pen and unless you are absolutely THERE the puppy and the kidlet shouldn't be allowed to interact--nips and bruises from a puppy who will soon weigh more than the kid need to be avoided.

I've had friends who put the kid in the x-pen as often as they put the puppy in the x-pen--but that's a whatever works for you and your family. And house training. Those really need to go on at the same time.

The rest of the training and socialization can go on as it can be worked into a schedule that has training for the puppy and child about how to interact with each other will allow.

Fortunately both toddlers and puppies grow and the interactions get less problematic as time goes on.

They'll probably end up being the best of friends. One of he members here John has lots of experience with puppies and his grandchildren. He can give you more insight than I can. And congratulations on your new family member soon to arrive.

dobebug
Hi dobebug, thanks for the heads up! Getting a pen was something I considered optional but now that you mention it, it's difficult to keep an eye on my little one as it is without the puppy. Better to not take any chances and I have ordered one already.

I always knew the initial introduction period between the two would be difficult but I can't wait for them to grow up together.

Hi Jay and welcome from the Pacific NW.

So... everything that dobebug said (with emphasis! LOL)

My son brought their new Dobe puppy home at almost 12 weeks to an already established Doberman household that also had a toddler and a 4 yo. They had a bit of a leg up in that both children were born and, raised around Dobes. Even at their young age, they totally understand how to act and behave around these dogs. It is second nature to them. This is my son's 3rd dobe and he himself was born into a home with both a Dobe and a Boxer.

That being said, extraordinary measures were still taken to insure a safe and healthy environment was provided for both the pup and the dogs. The boys have always had pretty much unlimited and mostly unsupervised interactions with my Doberman and my son's recently deceased senior boy. So rules and regulations regarding Popeye (the puppy) were novel to them. Mandatory separation when not strictly supervised was new. In the end, however, nothing works perfectly and the kids did end up with a few very minor bruises, scratches and bites. So that's something that may need to be expected. The one extremely important thing that both boys had to learn immediately is that they were NEVER to lay a hand on the puppy. Regardless of what happened they could not hit, kick or throw things at him. Unfortunately, this is sometimes an instinctual response by a very young child to a willful puppy when child become frustrated.

So fast forward to today. The younger child's now 2 yo and his older brother will be 5 yo in a few weeks. Popeye is now 7 months and the 3 of them get along wonderfully. He is totally out of his "Dobershark" phase. The pup sleeps crated in their room. The older boy is working on command and obedience compliance with him and can successfully walk him on a leash. He does have an advantage in that he has been practicing commands with my adult male, pretty much all of his little life. And he has become good at it. In a controlled environment he has close to 100% recall compliance. That is something that many adult dog owners never accomplish.

So... Baby steps. Literally! Everything is introduced slowly. For example: As of last week, my older grandson is teaching his little brother how to feed my dog. This is something that he has done from about the same age of 2. It is a fairly complicated procedure that requires the dog be completely obedient during everything from prep to cleanup.

One last thing... Both Popeye and the grandkids spend a lot of time at our house. So, even as well as the pup is coming along I alway have a 4 foot leash with me so the (not so little) terror can be tethered at a moments notice. Lately this happens more when my McCoy looks like he is about to revoke Popeye's "Puppy Pass". LOL

Come back on with any questions. This introductory, maturing and learning period passes very quickly. So make the most of it using calm. gentle and positive interactions and techniques. The effort that you put in over the next few months will benefit your family for a lifetime. And, if your family is anything like my, the effects will be multigenerational.

John Lichtwardt
Portland OR

Edit to say: I have a simple routine that I added to McCoy's little life when he first came home 6 1/2 years ago, that I am convinced aided him in becoming the most socialized dog that I have ever known. But right now, I am all typed out.

Later!

J.
Wow thank you for the feedback J! It's reassuring to know that there are many examples of toddlers learning alongside the adults.
Only thing I'm worried about is my little one not being that familiar with dogs in general. I know the first couple weeks might be tough setting boundaries for both.

If you get a chance I'd love to know the routine that helped settle McCoy when he first came.
 
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