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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need help.. jacks been in his biting stage at everything even when you tell him no. i was wondering if anyone has had this issue and how to deal with it. he does listen once in a while.. but it gotten to the point where my daughter whom is 5 told him no and he bite her on the arm.. didnt break skin but did leave a little bruise.
Thanks for the help if anyone can give it.
Jamie.
 

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I'm not sure exactly what kind of biting you're talking about. How old are these two puppies? Most puppies engage in play biting, which while it involves an actual bite using teeth is not an aggressive act, just playful. Doesn't mean it doesn't hurt but it's important to understand what is in the puppy's mind when he's doing it.

My favorite way of stopping a puppy from play biting, is first don't engage in playing with him with your hands. If he grabs at your hands or nips/bites them, shriek loudly in as high pitched a voice as you can manage. This usually startles the puppy into letting go. The moment he does, give him one of his own toys to play with. Play with him with the toy.

Also, I wouldn't let a five year old child try to discipline or train the puppy. The adult should do that first, then teach both child and puppy respect for each other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think jack is play biting, cause i dont think he meant it to hurt cause when my daughter let out a scream like someone was killing her.. jack just sat there stunned.. so i will try the screaming thing. Thanks.
 

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micdobe said:
My favorite way of stopping a puppy from play biting, is first don't engage in playing with him with your hands. If he grabs at your hands or nips/bites them, shriek loudly in as high pitched a voice as you can manage. This usually startles the puppy into letting go. The moment he does, give him one of his own toys to play with. Play with him with the toy.

Also, I wouldn't let a five year old child try to discipline or train the puppy. The adult should do that first, then teach both child and puppy respect for each other.
This is what I did with Chi and with just a little persistence and a lot of redirection, she caught on pretty quickly :)

Micdobes last comment (imo) is the most important. I did not (and still don't) ever allow Jordan (7yrs) and Chihiro access to each other unless I was right there with them. When Chi was 12 weeks, she was in the kennel even if I just had to go to the bathroom. Of course, through my actions, Jordan learned how to act and react to Chi but I would never put her in the position to correct the pup by herself. I also kept Jordan up off the floor when Chi was that age. If she wanted to lay on the floor or play with her toys down in the living room, Chi went in the kennel or on a leash practicing down stays and leave it (just too big of a temptation for a little pup).
As Chi has matured, she's learned "house manners" and now knows (most of the time) to leave Jordan and other things that aren't hers alone. Although, if she doesn't get enough excercise, she's still a nut. I know I've said it before but here goes again, a happy dobe is a tired dobe. Wear the little bugger out :)
 

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Those sharp front puppy teeth can hurt- they don't call them 'pinschers' for nothing! (sorry) Java would do the same thing when she wouldn't get 'her' way - nip with those front teeth. It's all part of your puppy trying to figure out her place in the pack. Does not make that behavior acceptable. I'd place my hand around her muzzle, give it a gentle shake, look her square in the eye and tell her 'NO BITING' in a firm voice. Don't scream, it will draw puppy's attention away from the bad behavior. Little devil once tested me and nipped me a second time - that landed her a quick trip to her crate with a sheet over it. Her time out wasn't long - maybe 5-10 minutes. Anything longer and puppies probably forget why they got their time out in the first place and will fall asleep. She wouldn't test my husband to the same extent - must be the deeper voice and firmer grip. Or, you could try picking up a few of those small squirt/plant misting bottle from the dollar store, hook one into your belt and give each child one. The minute puppy bites skin, they get a quick blast. Java LOVES water, but hates that blast in the muzzle. Maturity helps too, but you have to get puppy to realize that this kind of play is unacceptable. Now if Java is playing and accidently gives a nip, her ears go right back and she is SO sorry...
 

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Here's the way we learned to teach Bite Inhibition with ours. This is an excerpt from our Puppy Kindergarten Training Manual we use from St Hubert's Animal Welfare Center, that we used in our classes. I'll probably get introuble for copyright issues, but this really explains alot about this behavior. I'll remove it if any one has an issue with this. We never had to go past the crying out part, to get her to stop.

Copyright March 2003 by St Hubert's Animal Welfare Department

"Puppy Nipping and Mouthing

Most puppies are perpetual biting machines. Puppies often nip or mouth the clothes and body parts of people and other animals as a part of play and in greeting. Puppy biting, although at times quite annoying and sometimes painful, is , in fact, a normal and essential developmental behavior. At this age, puppies are both actively teething and interacting with their new surroundings and pack members as puppies do… with their mouths. Although puppy mouthing is normal and natural and isn’t usually intended to do harm, it can tear clothes and results in cuts and bruises on bare skin. Conversely, the strong jaw of an adolescents or adult dog can inflict serious injury if the dog is not taught to inhibit the force of her bite. Addressing the nipping and mouthing problems in stages will help to teach your puppy to soften her mouth and not use their teeth to get your attention. Be patient. Don’t expect this to work miraculously overnight. Shaping any behavior or eliminating an unwanted behavior takes time. If you are not having success after a month, please speak with your trainer.

• Teaching acceptable behavior. Rather than just focusing on eliminating the biting, you must also think what you really want from your puppy instead. If your puppy nips or mouths people when they try to pet her, try giving her a tasty bit of food or a chew object to occupy her while you pet her, or teach her to sit quietly for a tidbit when you try to pet or greet her.
• Minimizing inappropriate behavior. Never encourage your puppy to grab you or your clothes. If she does grab or nip your clothes, cross your arms and look away from her or walk away from her so she learns that nipping gets no response from you. Don’t laugh, look at her or give in to her play as this rewards the behavior. We do not recommend roughhousing with puppies, since you are inadvertently encouraging her to bite your hands. If your puppy is worse when children are playing, try to keep her separated from the play or put her on a leash so her behavior can be controlled. Never let children tease or excite puppies into nipping and mouthy play.
• When your puppy is biting, you must teach her that her biting hurts. Puppies are very good at teaching one another this through their interactions and play sessions. If you watch the puppies during playtime, one pup might nip at another pup too hard and the “victim” will let out a yelp. The result is, play stops. But, only momentarily. Dogs don’t hold grudges. They quickly resume play and the “bitee” learns to use her mouth a bit softer to keep the game going. We recommend you use the same technique, one the pup understands. Whenever your puppy places her mouth on your body or clothing, let out a very loud “OUCH” so she knows it hurts (even though it doesn’t, don’t let her know the truth!). For some puppies this will startle them and inhibit their biting. For some puppies, it may actually increase the biting. Try to find the correct pitch that gets the point across. After you yell “OUCH”, leave the room for 30 seconds – time out – and return, making another attempt. If, after several sessions, the puppy is still biting, ask yourself how much exercise the puppy got that day? If it wasn’t adequate, this may be the answer. If it was, then discontinue this exercise. You may want to try other ways to punish the biting behavior. Try making a loud sound from a whistle or an air horn. To make any punishment work whether yelping, or loud sounds, you must catch her in the act, not afterwards and you must punish her every time she nips in order for it to work. Pet her quietly or give her a chew toy when she does stop the nipping to reward the calm relaxed behavior. Don’t punish her by hitting, slapping, kicking or other physical means. This sort of punishment can cause fear or aggression or even make the problem worse."
 

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This is what I do to break my puppies.


micdobe said:
I'm not sure exactly what kind of biting you're talking about. How old are these two puppies? Most puppies engage in play biting, which while it involves an actual bite using teeth is not an aggressive act, just playful. Doesn't mean it doesn't hurt but it's important to understand what is in the puppy's mind when he's doing it.

My favorite way of stopping a puppy from play biting, is first don't engage in playing with him with your hands. If he grabs at your hands or nips/bites them, shriek loudly in as high pitched a voice as you can manage. This usually startles the puppy into letting go. The moment he does, give him one of his own toys to play with. Play with him with the toy.

Also, I wouldn't let a five year old child try to discipline or train the puppy. The adult should do that first, then teach both child and puppy respect for each other.
 

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Yep---we went through the same thing with Bruno. He's still a bit nippy. But not as often. Now that his teeth are in, he's settled a bunch. He has also nipped a little to hard and bruised one of my boys. But nothing harmful. He is now catching on that biting is a NO NO (if only I could get him to stop eating the shoes LOL). He rarely bites now. I think they eventually grow out of it and it's deffinently a stage they go through. I think there are some REALLY great tips in this thread already.

Good Luck :)
 

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agree with Micdobe. I say ouch/no and always have a toy around to substitute. I never let teeth touch skin and I don't play rough wrestling games so the puppy is not confused. The puppy should be praised for playing with their toy after you substitute. They usually catch on fast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
agree with Micdobe. I say ouch/no and always have a toy around to substitute. I never let teeth touch skin and I don't play rough wrestling games so the puppy is not confused. The puppy should be praised for playing with their toy after you substitute. They usually catch on fast.
yeah, that is how i taught my cocker, but jack is taking a while to catch on.. hes getting better since i started this thread. but is very stubborn.
Thanks for all the advice.
 
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i have a small problem. i have a 8 week old pincher and his idea of play with my children is chaseing them and biteing thier heels. can anyone help me? how can i stop this?
 

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Petey is much better now too....but we still have problems when he is left with a house hold of stupid male teens. They ALL play way tooooo rough with him. If I catch them there is HELL to pay! I am not a yeller or a grounder....ever....but boy do I go off the deep end when it comes to this issue. I don't want to ever be in the position that my dog will need to be put down because he has bitten a small child too hard in the name of playing. He is not 100%, and we still do lots of time outs in the crate. If he gets too rough and nippy.....he is given one warning and then if he goes back for more, we say time out....in your crate! We leave him in there for a few minutes and 99% of the time....he stops the behavior....if not....in we go again!

Carol
 

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Red thinks he needs to mouth and lick every hand that tries to pet him. I've even tried letting him sniff people first so he's not trying to sniff them as they are petting him, but this hasn't worked.

We are consistent with doing to yelping and disengaging with him when he does it to us, but I don't see any difference is this behavior.

I know he's still a puppy and is in the midst of teething, but I really wish I could stop this behavior. People are already intimidated by the fact that he is a Doberman, but when they pluck up the courage to let him sniff them and then pet him, he turns his head and mouths them (or licks them).

He hasn't actually nipped anyone, since his intentions are not harmful - just curious and friendly, but people freak out a little when he turns his hand to their hand/arm and mouths/licks them. :(
 

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RED....wait until the boy is Petey's size.....see how afraid people are....especially when they see them flying through the air jumping on top of things!!!

I do think your boy will stop soon....he is right in the most painful part of teething, and you are doing everything right. Petey on the other hand...has those PITA brothers!

Carol ox
 

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RED....wait until the boy is Petey's size.....see how afraid people are....especially when they see them flying through the air jumping on top of things!!!

I do think your boy will stop soon....he is right in the most painful part of teething, and you are doing everything right. Petey on the other hand...has those PITA brothers!

Carol ox
I hope you're right! I can only imagine what will happen when he's Petey's size! o_O

Haha @ PITA
 
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