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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So, I was having a chat with our SAR group's vet, and the subject of deep chested dogs and bloat was brought up. long story short, his clinic does minimally invasive spay surgery laproscopically, and it would be very easy for him to add on prophylactic gastropexy to prevent torsion in the event of bloat.

Trying to rule out the cons- Funding is not an issue, and since it is all laproscopic, I believe that hugely cuts down on the recovery time with there being only 3 very small incisions instead of the big long one. I was wondering if anyone here has any experience with prophylactic gastropexy. What are your opinions?

I'm leaning towards a yes because I have zero idea of her lineage, and I would be devastated if something happened to her that could have been prevented by a simple extra step on a routine surgery. Better safe than sorry?
 
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Capri had a gastropexy during her spay, in large part because Kip had actually bloated when he was about two, and I did not want to go through that experience again.

She had an ordinary spay though, so she did have the long incision. Just a couple of days before she was due to have her stitches removed, she got off her leash and took a couple of mad dashes around the yard, opening up the incision again :( But the incision had not been healing well anyway and I think would have given us trouble no matter what.

Anyway, long story short, a bit of re-stitching, a little more time, she healed well and has never looked back. She has never bloated.......but of course it is a bit difficult to know whether the gastropexy has actually prevented any problems, or whether she has never been in danger of bloating.

The gastropexy, of course, does not prevent bloating, but simply keeps the stomach from rotating, which is the part that causes so much damage and tissue death.

I don't think I would put a dobe through surgery for a gastropexy alone, but if suitable surgery is being done for something else (like a spay), adding the gastropexy makes sense to me.
 

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Bloat has more to do with eating/drinking habits than pedigree (though the larger the dog the higher the chances). My rule of thumb is no playing for two hours before or after eating. I also watch my dogs water consumption very carefully, your dog should have no more than 16 oz of water in its bowl at any given time.

A dog that eats its food very fast is also more prone to bloat. If you feed kibble watering it down some also is supposed to reduce the likely hood of bloat. I lost my last Dobe to bloat, like you I'd like to get my dog tacked too, but don't want to do it until he needs to go under for something else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
She rarely gets to just flat out eat from her bowl.. its usually from some sort of puzzle toy, hand fed, or used for training treats. Mostly so I can control how fast she eats!

I understand it doesn't prevent bloat itself, but rather the deadly torsion. With all the health problems our breed can get- I think I'd like to cross on off the list if its within my means. (or at least try!)

Poor Capri- that sounds unpleasant :( I don't think I would do it without the spay.. I'd like to avoid anesthesia whenever possible.
 

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Bloat has more to do with eating/drinking habits than pedigree (though the larger the dog the higher the chances). My rule of thumb is no playing for two hours before or after eating. I also watch my dogs water consumption very carefully, your dog should have no more than 16 oz of water in its bowl at any given time.

A dog that eats its food very fast is also more prone to bloat. If you feed kibble watering it down some also is supposed to reduce the likely hood of bloat. I lost my last Dobe to bloat, like you I'd like to get my dog tacked too, but don't want to do it until he needs to go under for something else.
Certainly what you say about eating and drinking seems to have some correlation with bloat and it is a good idea to monitor both the amount and the speed of eating and drinking. Bloodlines and anatomy (deep-chested) have been found to have some correlation too, however.

You can also see opposing advice like dry kibble--wet kibble, raised dish--floor level dish.....and on and on. I think whenever you see lots of supposed "causes" of a condition, it means they really don't have a clue what is going on.
 

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Kylee was done laproscopically while under for her spay when she was 16 months old. By the next morning she was hard to keep down. My Riggs was done with via an open surgery with a huge incision. The laproscopic surgery is so much easier on them. I lost one to bloat/torsion, I will have Jinx done when I spay her.
 

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joie de vivre
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Fiona had a gastropexy at time of spay - neither were done laproscopically but she was virtually unfazed. Crazy girl was FINE within about 12-hours of getting her home and I nearly lost my mind trying to keep her calm. Healing time was a little longer than just a say recovery but it was worth it.

I like having the peace of mind knowing that she can't torsion. I'm especially happy to have had it done since one of her grand dams and one of her litter mates (a brother) have died of bloat - both instances it happened too fast to be able to save either of them. Scary stuff. Her stomach not being able to torsion may be the difference between giving me just enough extra time to save her, and her dying.
 

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Luv-The-Nub
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OF COURSE. I always pexi my dogs when they are under for spay/neuter and highly recommend it to anyone who is willing! "an ounce of prevention".....
Just make sure you have a good vet that you trust. :)
 

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Shanoa had a gastropexy done with her spay, too. I don't regret it at all, and like brw1982's Fiona, she bounced back very quickly. It was a challenge to keep her quiet because she felt great. There was a very long incision, but it healed very well. I chose to do it because both my own, trusted vet recommended it, and because I have a very good friend who is a vet out in Portland and is a critical care specialist, and she highly recommended doing it.

To me, it's worth the money to know that if she does bloat I will have extra time to save her. I would do it again if I have another female.
 

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Sirai Dobermans
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I have a male who recently had a gastropexy done via laparoscopy at the time of neuter because I lost my last male to torsion. He stayed overnight with the vet hospital because he's vwd affected, but experienced no problems.

I'd do it again in a heartbeat since the laparoscopy is not as invasive. I can't think of one reason why I wouldn't do it.
 

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kopfgeschlagen
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I wanted to have it done with Elke's spay but my vet wasn't comfortable doing it. Fortunately we have not had a problem because I am careful about feeding, watering, exercise. If I get another female puppy in the future, I will definitely have it done. Now I know the veterinary surgeons who do the procedure.
 

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We did laparoscopic ovariectomy and lap assisted pexied at the same time as there was family history of bloat. We pexi our dogs even if we don’t neuter.

Lap is the bomb. She didn’t get the memo that she had had surgery and was back to her normal self 12 hours later. Procedure at 5, home at 10, pain pills at 2 am and up at 5 am talking smack at the dog.

Vet said she could be fine with her daily routine, walks, stairs, easy play, jumping up to the couch and bed and training classes, but to eliminate hard roughhousing with the dogs, screaming around the yard too much and no jumping exercises in her obedience and agility classes for 3 weeks. No weaves or too many hard turns either. She did not miss any of her classes…we just modified them. She was in her obedience class two days after surgery, back to her tracking class and agility class the same week.

The cost for the procedures including all the extras was $800. Big city town by a highly experienced in the procedures GP vet
 
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