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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone

Bruno likes to get a hold of things and give them a good shake as if he's killing whatever it is. I've seen plenty of dogs do that so that's not too much of a concern so long as it's directed in the correct manner.

But tonight he got a grip of the scruff of the neck on Molly (our 8.5yr old Lab) and started trying to give that a shake. Like full puppy intensity. Georgina had to get a grip of him to get him off of Molly and gave him a loud voice correction at the time (to which he responded ok to).

Now this is a concern for me because I'm sure, in his eyes, he's exercising prey drive or whatever, but we can't have a fully grown Doberman trying to grab other dogs & shake them to bits.

Bruno is just over 10 weeks old at the minute.

Is this something I should be stopping, no matter what he's doing it to (i.e. inatimate objects etc)? Or should I redirect to something ok when he does it inappropriately? Or...help?

Any thoughts will be most welcome because this will be the easiest time to nip things in the bud, I'm sure most would agree!

Cheers
 

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In situations like this it's nice to have an adult dog who will gently tell the puppy not to do something, but I understand not all dogs are like that.

Being that he's only 10 weeks old, I probably wouldn't worry too much. Puppies do things that adult dogs wouldn't normally do. Like pull other dogs' hair, tug on tails, grab skin/scruff and shake, etc. I do interrupt any play I deem as too rough or inappropriate from my dogs, and if you feel what he's doing is inappropriate, then I don't see a problem with redirecting him to something else or telling him to be nice. To be honest, I really can't remember exactly how my puppies played with my adults, but I do know that they had a lot of things to learn and that my adults helped them get there. Along with my assistance when needed. I did have a dog briefly who I got as an older puppy (7 months) who thought it was fun to literally choke another dog in play. I corrected her for this and redirected her to something else. She'd just grab their throats and grip as hard as she can, until the other dog was choking. She also played super rough period actually. I don't know why, or if she's still like this, but I didn't like it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks very much for that.

I had hoped that the reply would be something like that.

Molly, in general, is very good with Bruno. She's very patient with him, even when he's hanging from her cheeks and just being a cheeky wee bugger!

She can be grumpy sometimes, so I imagine the shaking wasn't bothering her too much as she was just taking it, but it was felt that it needed corrected. By the time Molly felt it, her correction might have been a little sterner than Georgina's!

Thanks again:)
 

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Many adults will tolerate quite a bit from a young pup. As he gets older, she will likely start to be less tolerant and correct his behavior when he's too rough or not using good doggie manners. I wouldn't worry about it at this point.
 

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SOmeone reciently told me to use a water bottle on Kira when ever she went to chase the cats threw the house??? I haven't gotten one yet... It might work for you as well with a good firm name calling and a no with a time out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for that peoples!

One question re: time outs...
we'd like to do that, but the only place for time out would be his crate. Is there a chance he may associate crate time with time out, thus associate negativity with his crate?
 

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I used crate time outs when Fi was a puppy and would go overboard. She's just fine with her crate to this day.

I think it depends on how you react about him going in the crate. I was always very matter of fact about it with Fiona. When she needed a time out it was just a simple, calm "that's enough" or whatever and then I'd lead her to her crate and put her up. Once she'd calmed down, I'd let her out. If you don't make it negative and upsetting, it won't be.

The crate can be made negative though if you react badly before and while putting him in it. Just be sure to keep a cool head when you do it and be consistent. He'll learn what behavior(s) earns him a time out and he'll learn that he only comes out when he's calm.

If you're not totally comfortable giving him a time out in his crate, you can always just redirect him and do calming exercises with him. That may take more persistence on your part to calm him down though since he's not being entirely removed from the situation but rather still interacting with you.
 
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