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Hello,
i will be doing an update on Nani soon
But first, i want to switch her dog food. (in a couple weeks, and slowly transition within 14 days of course.)

I have searched through dozens of brands and only found a few i liked. One being Orijen brand.
No animal by products, no oats, no wheat, no rice, no grains really. One of the few that use animal organs. no harmful preservatives. etc etc
(i know about the law suit, have done my research, and personally think it is rubbish.)

I wanted to know if anyone here uses this brand for their Dobes?

Currently, she is eating Fromm for puppys. (large breed. i will keep her on large breed with orijen too)
Perhaps its all about trying things out and seeing what works best for her?

Thank you everyone :)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
PS: I know I know. I am being extremely picky. Im not saying there is anything wrong with other brands. Or anything wrong with what other people choose to feed their pups. Im just a new puppy owner/mama and just want to try out what i think is best :)
 

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Dogs don't need grain exclusive foods. That said, get a small bag and see how it goes. The best dog food is the food your dog does best on. Orijen didn't work out for us.

(Also, try to avoid posting the same thread in multiple places.)
 

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I used to feed Orijen. I personally wouldn't feed it now, but that's my choice.

I feed Proplan, because it meets WSAVA standards. My dogs' cardiologists recommends it, and she works with a board certified nutritionist. Because we don't yet know why so many dogs are having issues with DCM that are related to nutrition with so many grain-free/boutique brand foods (and foods made by Champion were some of the most frequent offenders), that's a brand I wouldn't feed.

I prefer to feed Proplan since it has a long history of doing food trials on their food, digestibility studies, publishing research, and employs a team of veterinary nutritionists to formulate and test the food. Additionally, I know many, many long time Doberman breeders and owners that have had long-lived dogs on it.

Again, just my choice. My dogs thrive on it. Food is a hot topic. People can feed whatever they'd like...you'll get a million answers on this. :)
 

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I too use to feed Orijin however I no longer feed grain free and the high protein percentage did not agree with my girl. i switched to Fromm made in the USA my dogs love their products. My dobies do better when the protein is around 24% nothing higher that 26%
 

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As an FYI, other brands also used organs. However, since they are usually included under the catch-all name of "____ byproducts", people weird out and think that a food isn't any good because of "byproducts". The irony is that foods claiming "contains no byproducts" then goes on to list said byproducts individually.

These are the AAFCO definitions of dog and cat food ingredients. https://talkspetfood.aafco.org/whatisinpetfood

And their page on byproducts. https://talkspetfood.aafco.org/byproducts
 

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All three of mine (female husky, male malamute/husky mix, male adopted puppy-son doberman) are fed raw. That's a choice we've made due to some kibbe sensitivity the husky has and just moved the boys to raw since it was easier to have all of them on raw instead of two different foods. For me, its worked well, but its a lot of work to do the right amounts of each thing. I know others have used Purina Proplan and the dobie was on it before and he was fine on it but again, it was just easier to have all three on the same food.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Dogs don't need grain exclusive foods. That said, get a small bag and see how it goes. The best dog food is the food your dog does best on. Orijen didn't work out for us.

(Also, try to avoid posting the same thread in multiple places.)
i know and i tried to delete the other one but didnt see an option to.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the answers! i will look into it more. i just dont want to feed her corn or wheat. thank you! :)
 

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You can't delete anything—only the mods can. You can go in and edit your post and put something like "oops" or "sorry" or whatever instead of the duplicate text, but only for about 25 minutes and then…it's up there forever.
 

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Thanks for all the answers! i will look into it more. i just dont want to feed her corn or wheat. thank you! :)
Can I ask why?

Many people think that corn, wheat, etc is bad for dogs, but it's not. Corn is highly digestible and a good source of nutrition for dogs, and wheat is not a common allergen. If dogs are going to develop a food allergy (and food allergies are very, very uncommon in dogs), it will almost certainly be to a protein.

There is a ton of misinformation on the internet from people who purport to be experts who have absolutely no training in canine nutrition, and they have really convinced people that dogs have different nutritional needs than they actually do. This has fueled the "grain-free" food industry, and their marketing is very strong.

I'm not saying you can't feed what you want, but none of this is based on actual nutritional science.
 

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"Can I ask why?

Many people think that corn, wheat, etc is bad for dogs, but it's not. Corn is highly digestible and a good source of nutrition for dogs, and wheat is not a common allergen. If dogs are going to develop a food allergy (and food allergies are very, very uncommon in dogs), it will almost certainly be to a protein."

Corn and wheat are most often used in cheap grain based dog foods. They are a cheap way to raise the protein levels of foods. I cannot think of a decent meat based food that uses corn or wheat in the ingredients for their foods. Having been involved in rescue for many years...the dogs often coming into rescue that stunk, and had ear infections were being fed dog foods that were loaded with corn,wheat, and soy...Pedigree, Kibbles'N'Bits, Dog Chow,Beneful etc.

The thinking has changed about DMC dog food induced problems. There never was a study, or any science based facts. It was the large dog food companies, that were losing millions of dollars in business...that jumped on the band wagon and ran with the unsubstantiated news.
https://www.veterinarypracticenews.com/grain-diet-not-linked-to-dcm-in-dogs-study-says/
 

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"Can I ask why?

Many people think that corn, wheat, etc is bad for dogs, but it's not. Corn is highly digestible and a good source of nutrition for dogs, and wheat is not a common allergen. If dogs are going to develop a food allergy (and food allergies are very, very uncommon in dogs), it will almost certainly be to a protein."

Corn and wheat are most often used in cheap grain based dog foods. They are a cheap way to raise the protein levels of foods. I cannot think of a decent meat based food that uses corn or wheat in the ingredients for their foods. Having been involved in rescue for many years...the dogs often coming into rescue that stunk, and had ear infections were being fed dog foods that were loaded with corn,wheat, and soy...Pedigree, Kibbles'N'Bits, Dog Chow,Beneful etc.

The thinking has changed about DMC dog food induced problems. There never was a study, or any science based facts. It was the large dog food companies, that were losing millions of dollars in business...that jumped on the band wagon and ran with the unsubstantiated news.
https://www.veterinarypracticenews.com/grain-diet-not-linked-to-dcm-in-dogs-study-says/
I don't want to get into too much of a debate here, but there isn't, in fact, a conclusion amongst veterinary cardiologists that there is "not a link between diet and DCM."

The summary posted is worded in an incredibly misleading way. You can actually tell who has read the original "study" (and I'm using that very loosely) based on the way that it's being shared. It isn't a study at all. The original piece is a meta-analysis of the data available, not an empiracal study at all. The authors are employed by Zignature (one of the companies that is most highly implicated in the reports of nutritional DCM).

Essentially, the authors data-mined from publicly available databases and ran their own analysis. There's nothing wrong with that, but the idea that this is a "study" is false. In fact, the authors are pretty clear in stating that "more study is needed," which is EXACTLY what veterinary cardiologists and nutritionists have been saying the whole time, and studies are ongoing. That doesn't mean there is no link, it simply means we don't yet know what is going on. We do not yet know what the link is. We do, however, have many, many documented cases of dogs who have had diagnosed cases of DCM who have had that reversed with a change in diet, with no medication.

The authors clearly stated that no link had been found yet and clearly made suggestions of what further research might be done. The paper has been used to suggest there is no link by some pet food companies that have an agenda, and by some others who believe there is no link.

Again, research is ongoing, and there are many many documented cases of diet induced DCM reversed with a simple diet change.

From the paper itself, "Since small sample sizes and overrepresentation of breeds are commonplace in DCM literature, the studies involving multiple breeds and larger sample groups are warranted to better understand if relationships exist between potential etiologies and the development of DCM for the overall dog population."

And, "To further understand the incidence rate and if there is a possible increase in DCM, multi-clinic, retrospective studies are warranted to identify a percentage of the population seeking referral to diagnose DCM, the incidence in specific breeds, and diet history, with comparison to market share."

Their conclusion is that no link has been established yet, which is true, because studies are ongoing. No scientist would say there is a link - no good studies have been concluded yet. It's simply too early for that.

The idea that pet food companies like Purina are running a conspiracy to increase their market share by starting a DCM scare is ridiculous.
 

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I would also take the time to research a raw diet. Certainly not for everyone but worth looking into. We have been very happy with the results and our 2 yr old baby girl seems happy as well.
 
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