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I recall years ago getting some quotes for a cleaning and I about fell over because I guess they won't just sedate, they want the dog out so it is quite a process. Because I have other dental experience and tools, I decided I would get in and manage things a bit. I realize I cannot do the "super ultra" job without sedation, but just trying to keep things in check.

I got in there today and there are a couple molars that are really built up and it's already challenging trying to work with a child like dog.

Curious what you folks have tried? Am I the only one to do real dental cleaning on a dog? I would be super open to chews that work, but I can tell you my dog chews on precisely NOTHING. Not even natural bones. Vets have tried to hand off certain expensive thingies that "all dogs love", but I have found nothing she will take to.

I think if I could get her to chew her way through some of the tarter, I could get a better attack going. The canines and front grill are pearly, I am mostly dealing with molars right now. I am thinking this might be a process where I do a little each day because she gets a little stressed over it. I am not concerned about bites or anything.
 

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If there is a lot of plaque you're going to need your dog to be sedated. Scale tools can only get you so far. A 9 y/o and a dog that doesn't chew with lots of plaque it's likely that there are some teeth that need to be pulled and your dog will have to be sedated for that. I just had a dental done on my 11 y/o girl and she was just fine. She feels MUCH better after having a few teeth extracted too.
 

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If there is a lot of plaque you're going to need your dog to be sedated. Scale tools can only get you so far. A 9 y/o and a dog that doesn't chew with lots of plaque it's likely that there are some teeth that need to be pulled and your dog will have to be sedated for that. I just had a dental done on my 11 y/o girl and she was just fine. She feels MUCH better after having a few teeth extracted too.
Just to clarify if I mislead but she has never been a "chewing" dog once out of the puppy phase. I see no signs of dental pain, discomfort when eating, etc. All is well otherwise other than build up on 2 molars. Canines cleaned right up.
 

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I had thought of making our own thread, but this one is perfect to add on to!

We found out about feeding raw bones as a supplement from another large dog, natural diet, dog owner. The vet tech said that the action of ripping and tearing the raw meat from the bone triggers an excretion of an enzyme that retards tartar. We cut off the small removeable part at the end of the Raw Beef Back bone. We take it away from them and toss the bare bone when it is stripped.

Bella who is 10 1/2 had a raw beef back bone almost every day from age 1 to 8. Loki (3 1/2 years old) has had one about every 4 days as well as Bella the same amount for the last 2 1/2 years. Just recently I gave them bones for seven days in a row. At 3.99 per pound this cost about 38$. I wanted to see if there was some improvement. I think that there was.

1st picture, Loki, not quite as good as I had hoped but an improvement. Those dark lines I will try to scrape. He lets me, with a thumb nail, and I'm not sure what the bloody part is. I have also bought some dog tooth paste to which he is not opposed.
2nd photo, Bella, as good as ever; hates having her mouth touched, rips and tears more aggressively than Loki... also many many more bones than Loki by his age, sadly. I hope to get more regularly scheduled bones in him.

So...do you think these teeth need a cleaning or dental work/ Neither of them have ever had any dental work and the rest of their diet is kibble and raw carrots.
Gesture Finger Wood Tooth Fish
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Skin Dog Jaw Liver Ear
 

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Your vet should be checking your dog's teeth at their exam at least annually (if not more often). I wouldn't guess even by looking at a photo if they need a cleaning. Problems with teeth can lead to much, much worse health issues, so if teeth need to be cleaned, or if a tooth needs to be extracted I would certainly do it, unless there was a good reason not to. Even a senior dog can typically have a cleaning under sedation unless they have a health issue that puts them at risk - that's a discuss to be had with your vet.

Being proactive early is good, and it really depends on your dog. Obviously brushing is the gold standard. Some people feed raw bones, or dental chews, or use other things. You can always visit the veterinary oral health council page for information: Veterinary Oral Health Council
 

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I have SE's teeth cleaned once a year. Along with a CBC. She takes about 20 minutes because her teeth are in good shape due to having dentals every year. She has wear on her back molars due to chewing on her bones. But that's it.. She isn't out long because her teeth are in good shape. You don't know if there is a cracked tooth somewhere and it's best to address that early if there is one. I reccomend dentals to my grooming customers if I think they need it. One lady put it off for 7 years. And when she did finally do it, 15 teeth got pulled because she waited so long.
 

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Raw bones that are excellent for teeth cleaning are bones like beef ribs or knuckle bones, chicken or duck feet, chicken necks etc. You can get lots of these for cheap from a local butcher shop. Stay away from dense weight bearing bones like femur, those aren’t great for your dogs teeth.

Dried chews you might like could be pork skin (that’s full pieces of just dried pork skin, no other ingredients), chicken feet, pig ears, billy sticks etc.
 

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I'd be pickier about what I was giving in hopes of cleaning up teeth in an older dog to avoid dentistry.

Pork skin, pigs ears both have a lot of fat. Chicken feet are up to $5.95 a pound at my best price grocery store (and we won't even get into the fact that this particular dog doesn't like them.) Chicken necks are pretty iffy in my book--maybe for small dogs but all too often Dobes will try to gag down the entire neck (even when there is no competition). A friend who was giving chicken necks had a dog who got one stuck and that meant a trip to the vet who asked her "What were you thinking?" I prefer knuckle bones but they work best given regularly--trying to use them to remove plaque on a dogs teeth when the dog hasn't had regularly gotten bones to chew and/or had his teeth brushed is rarely a successful treatment.

dobebug
 

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My grocery store doesn't even sell stuff like feet and necks--except last time I went, they had a package or two of chicken fat (pure fat--no meat or bones) for sale--I can't remember the price, but I wondered why you actually need to buy pure chicken fat separately.
 

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Chicken fat is a good additive to savory soups and sauces. Especially if you aren't starting with a whole bird. It's a nice shortcut when one is making soup with, say, Costco's packs of pulled rotisserie chicken.
 
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My grocery store doesn't even sell stuff like feet and necks--except last time I went, they had a package or two of chicken fat (pure fat--no meat or bones) for sale--I can't remember the price, but I wondered why you actually need to buy pure chicken fat separately.
The grocery store I shop at most often didn't carry them until half way through the second year of the pandemic--first times I saw them there they were $1.95 a pound over the last year they've slowly gone up to the $5.95 they are now. I asked a Japanese friend one time (many years ago when she was ordering a case (25 pounds) of frozen chicken feet)--what on earth you did with them. She said that her grandparents (immigrants) liked them and when they came to dinner her mother would make them about once a year. She also said when she was a kid her mom made her try them one time--she said once was enough for her--and yes I had to have more details--ICK--I was sorry I did that. She said that they were simmered for a couple of hours with a bunch of spices (she had no idea what kind) and then served. What you ate of the chicken feet turned out to be the little muscular part in what would be the instep on a mammal--she said it was only about an inch of edible muscle on the entire foot.

But it did explain why her mother had her order the 25 pound boxes.

And the same market that I shop at mostly is also carrying chicken necks now and I was recently in a Safeway and noticed that they too have (very recently) started carrying chicken feet and necks. Haven't seen any chicken fat though.

dobebug/ABTLH
 
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