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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there.

Owned several dogs growing up (mostly Australian Cattle dogs). Now I'm married and thinking about buying a Doberman. While trying to educate myself on the breed, I found this place and thought I'd say "hey".

Any/all advice is welcome.
 
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welcome, there is a lot to learn about the breed here. I am glad you found this site before going out on a limb and buying a puppy without doing your research on the breed.

ask away, there is no wrong question to ask ;)

are you looking for anything specific? Like just a pet, working dog, agility, show?

there is so many option like rescue and making sure you know the difference between a backyard breeder and an ethical breeder. Whatever it is we can help point you in the right direction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
are you looking for anything specific? Like just a pet, working dog, agility, show?
Looking for a Companion/Guard dog. I've always loved having a dog to play with and have that "man's best friend" relationship with. At the same time, my wife likes to jog and I want her to have something intimidating by her side.
 

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Welcome from VA I live about 20 minutes from Reston and just got my Doberman puppy about 2 weeks ago. They are great dogs but definitely do your research and this is a great website!
 

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Welcome from Sterling!
 

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Welcome from Tidewater, VA!

Glad you're here before you buy...makes all the difference.
 

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Welcome to DT. One thing is if it is to be a jogging partner for your wife. The puppy should not be forced to jog until 18 months old when the growth plates close.
 

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Herb is right. You can always consider an adult rescue :) many of them are already house trained, crate trained, and ready to protect their people :)


Also, dobermans are not outdoor dogs. They were bred as personal protection dogs meant to be wherever their people are. If you're looking more for a guard dog as in property, a Doberman wouldn't be a good choice. They are sensitive and very Velcro.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
One thing is if it is to be a jogging partner for your wife. The puppy should not be forced to jog until 18 months old when the growth plates close.
Good to know. Thanks for the info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You can always consider an adult rescue :) many of them are already house trained, crate trained, and ready to protect their people :)
I'm seriously considering getting a rescue. Do rescue organizations check them for health issues or would I be taking a big risk and hope nothing is wrong when I take it to the vet for tests?

Also, dobermans are not outdoor dogs.
It would never be kept outdoors. I love dogs and whichever one I get will be considered part of the family and a personal guardian.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here's a doberman I'd consider adopting: Dog #10 McGee - DAREsDobes

I don't want to adopt a doberman - only for it to be unhappy in its new home. So here's my situation and hopefully you guys can tell me if my home is ok for a doberman.

I currently live in a townhouse with one other person (my wife). We have a very small backyard and a fence, but it's a "dog friendly" neighborhood with places to walk. I leave for work at 7 am and don't return till 6 pm, monday through friday. Depending on the day, my wife has shifts that are 7 am to 3 pm or 12 pm to 9:30 pm. That means the doberman would be by himself for around 7 to 9 hours (monday through friday) depending on the day. Is that too long for a doberman to be alone? Am I just not in the right situation to own a doberman at this time?
 
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Here's a doberman I'd consider adopting: Dog #10 McGee - DAREsDobes

I don't want to adopt a doberman - only for it to be unhappy in its new home. So here's my situation and hopefully you guys can tell me if my home is ok for a doberman.

I currently live in a townhouse with one other person (my wife). We have a very small backyard and a fence, but it's a "dog friendly" neighborhood with places to walk. I leave for work at 7 am and don't return till 6 pm, monday through friday. Depending on the day, my wife has shifts that are 7 am to 3 pm or 12 pm to 9:30 pm. That means the doberman would be by himself for around 7 to 9 hours (monday through friday) depending on the day. Is that too long for a doberman to be alone? Am I just not in the right situation to own a doberman at this time?
I just sent my application in to volunteer with DAR&E! I think McGee would be a lovely addition. I would just talk to the rescue about you situation. If you are willing to give plenty of exercise and training while you are home during the week, I think you could make it work! :)
 

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Greetings from Texas, welcome to the forum, and thanks for considering a "repurposed" Doberman!
Looking for a Companion/Guard dog...I currently live in a townhouse with one other person...
I advise you check with your landlord to see if Dobes are allowed. Some property owners do not allow Dobes (and GSDs, Rotts, APBTs, Chows, etc.) because their insurance company deems them a "dangerous breed". If you own your home, check with your homeowner's insurance company to see if they'll drop you for having a Doberman.
...my wife likes to jog and I want her to have something intimidating by her side.
Adopting an adult Dobe is a good choice for folks who want a jogging partner now. The dog's growth plates in its long bones have already closed and it can tolerate "forced" exercise.
...That means the doberman would be by himself for around 7 to 9 hours (monday through friday) depending on the day. Is that too long for a doberman to be alone?...
Look for a pet-sitter that can come to your home and give your dog a mid-day potty break.
Do rescue organizations check [their dogs] for health issues or would I be taking a big risk and hope nothing is wrong when I take it to the vet for tests?
It depends on the rescue group's finances. Some simply don't have the funds to do more than a basic HW test. Others will test for vWD, thyroid functioning, hip dysplasia, arthritis, tick-borne diseases, intestinal parasites, the DCM mutation, etc.

Then it depends on the level of care the dog received from its previous owner. Some dogs come in to rescue from unknown backgrounds and in poor physical condition. It's rare, but some dogs come in to rescue with complete vet records, from a responsible owner who can no longer care for the dog (for example, the owner died).

I recommend you learn about the most common health problems that affect Dobermans as a breed, the most common health problems affecting dogs as they age, and the most common health problems seen in abandoned/neglected dogs. Then you can draw up a list of "deal-breakers" and let the rescue know you don't want to adopt a dog that has or may develop any of those health conditions*. (But please be realistic. Some conditions, such as arthritis and many cancers, can't be avoided, only treated.)

Also, bear in mind that dogs that test in the low range of normal thyroid functioning before their spay/neuter can be hypothyroid six months later. De-sexing does not cause hypothyroidism. It's just that the sex hormones can compensate for low-thyroid functioning. Once the gonads are removed and the dog no longer produces sex hormones, the underlying pre-existing low thyroid functioning can become apparent.

There is another source to consider: some ethical breeders have non-baby Dobes of their breeding available. Some of these dogs are older pups they kept from a litter to see how they'd mature. The pup did not mature in the way the breeder hoped and the breeder wants to place it in a companion home. Also, some ethical breeders have adult Dobes that were returned to them because the owners couldn't take care of them anymore (death, illness, loss of income) and would like to place them with active owners.

Best wishes for a successful DoberSearch!:wavey:

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*For example, I foster dogs who have almost any condition, but my premises are simply not set up to safely house a blind dog. So, I can foster a dog with sarcoptic mange, but not a blind one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I advise you check with your landlord to see if Dobes are allowed. Some property owners do not allow Dobes (and GSDs, Rotts, APBTs, Chows, etc.) because their insurance company deems them a "dangerous breed".
Did not know that. I better check on that first thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Look for a pet-sitter that can come to your home and give your dog a mid-day potty break.
Would the pet-sitter be a deal breaker?

I just have serious trouble trusting someone with keys to my home.
 
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