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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is kind of a mix between new member intro's, and a general inquiry.
First of all my name is Matt, and I am located in Kansas. I will be purchasing a home this february, and have been doing a lot of research as to what dog will best fit me. The good new is that I have picked a doberman. We will de looking for a female.

My wife, and I have decided it will be best to wait until all matters with the new house are settled, before the dobe is introduced into our home. This way all of our attention can be devoted to our new friend.

I have done quite a bit of research so far on the breed, but google can only tell a person so much. From you experienced owners I am curious if you have any tips for us. This will be our first time owning a doberman. We are looking for anything beyond the basic information you find all over the internet. What, if any, were your struggles the first time you owned a doberman. I want this dog to have the best possible opportunity to have a long, happy, and healthy life.

Finally as far as breeders go. There are three located in Kansas. I am willing to travel any distance to find the right dog for us. If you have any recommendations, good previous experiences, even bad ones would be much appreciated. I will take all the help I can get. Thanks!!
 

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Welcome!

Geez, do I love those Kansa Dobermans....8)

You might check on the DPCA (Doberman Pinscher Club of America) website to see if there are any chapters in your area. You may be able to meet with active Doberman owners to not only get to know more about the breed, but to possibly get some hands-on time with a Doberman or two. Also, you'll have someone in your area to help in case you find yourself needing some hands-on advice (ears, anyone?)!

Just peruse this forum a bit and you'll probably find out more than you ever asked to know about the breed. The most important things to remember, for me, is that our dogs are very intelligent, very active and need a job to do. Positive reinforcement training with steady repetition goes a long, long way. Boundaries, boundaries, boundaries. Familiarize yourself with the "Nothing In Life Is Free" philosophy. This does wonders for dog training or any problems you may encounter.

The best part about being owned by a Doberman, however, is a three-way tie between Dober-nose-pokies, Dober-nub-wiggles, and Dober-chatter-conversations. These are three of my favorites. Welcome in, and don't be afraid to ask for anything!
 

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Just to help you pick your house:

It sure is nice to have a tile or washable floor inside every outside doorway. As well as a deck or concrete pad outside of every backyard doorway. An hard and waterproof flooring area for feeding and for keeping dog food bags. At least one room that will have space for a crate and/or dog bed (plus your furniture)--which will also be the same room you will spend most of your time in. An area you can barricade off with a baby gate or two when your dog is young. I have liked my oversized shower stall with a hose nozzle for giving the dog baths.

Perhaps silly suggestions and perhaps not quite what you want, but when you house shop, you might want to consider these.
 

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Just to help you pick your house
Oh, cool! I didn't know we were helping to pick the house! LOL!

Pick the biggest, best yard that comes with a house you can live with! You can always change a house, but you cannot "grow" a yard. Make sure that physical fencing is not restricted entirely or in some silly unlivable way (only allowing decorative wrought iron, for example). Don't pick a house right by a school, and pick a house as far as practical from major streets/highways.
 

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Yeah don't get sucked into some fascisti HOA that doesn't allow fences...oh and be sure to run ALL faucets(shower included) to check for leaks. My pain=your gain ~8D
Good luck w/your search there is a LOT of info on here, pretty much an encylopedia of gems woven in throughout, take your time and don't buy from a BYB or mill.
:)
 

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Hey! I am from Kansas myself, I grew up in Gardner. We are living in Illinois right now, so I go back several times a year to see family. We are getting ready to get our Doberman and are really excited too. Good luck!! (If you need a realtor reference in the area, let me know you can email me or PM me I know a few really great ones.)
 

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Greetings and welcome to the forum!

Speaking of strict HOA policies...many insurance companies won't provide homeowners insurance if you own a "dangerous" or "aggressive" breed. Some municipalities ban certain breeds, or require liability insurance with high damage amounts. (Sorry, not sure if that's what it's called.)

Not sure if you're looking for a conformation prospect, but some municipalities require that "dangerous/aggressive" breeds be spayed/neutered, which would prevent your dog from being shown in the AKC conformation ring.

Also, probably obvious to most people but it still needs to be stated: big dogs eat larger quantities, drink larger quantities, poop larger quantities, and vomit larger quantities. Their surgeries, medication, dog beds, crates, dishes, collars, pet insurance and shipping cost more. You need a larger vehicle to transport them. They can be proportionately more destructive than smaller breeds. They can counter-surf more easily than smaller breeds.

It hurts more when a large-breed dog steps on or runs into you accidentally (or not ;) ) or bites you playfully (or not :( ). And let's not forget what they can do to your stomach when they gleefully jump into your lap and they weigh upwards of 75 pounds! Oooof!

Thanks for doing your due diligence and researching the breed before getting a Doberman. Best wishes for a successful DoberSearch.:wavey:
 

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What is your prior dog experience, and what is your lifestyle like? What is it that appeals to you about the Doberman?

They are often described as a mix between pushy and sensitive, which can be tricky to get used to. Give an inch, these guys will take 5 miles, yet get too aggro with your training and you potentially ruin your bond. It takes a firm, patient, fair, patient, consistent, patient owner to raise these puppies into the amazing adults they can become. ;) I have read that females can be a bit easier for first-time Dobe owners, depending on the female. I'd suggest you work with your breeder to find the right temperamented lady for your lifestyle and what you want in your future companion.

Good luck, read through the educational archives, ask away and THANK YOU for researching!!


DT Educational Archive - Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums
 

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RedMaro, welcome and a very thoughtful writeup.

For me, the best thing you can do with a puppy is to spend much time in the beginning...and mould it with manners & intelligence.
- loads of love, play, socialization and start puppy OB training
Spend the quality time early on, and the rest of the dog raising can be a "walk in the park".

I give my puppy, absolute freedom & access...in the entire home.
- only crate when I am out and my puppy rule is 4 hours alone max.
But this requires supervision & work, but the results can be accelerated with a reduced timeline.
- I will let my pup explore and make a few mistakes, then give positive correction...to learn from
example:
Our puppy went to chew the computer electrical cord on day2...but I was there to stop her with a sharp no.
I substituted a real nice toy to mouth on / problem never happened again.
I view the early pup mistakes as learning opportunities...that last a lifetime.

Decide if pup will be on the living room furniture or off...sleep in the humans bed or not / when your home.
- some young puppies should be taken outside for potty training every hour (others can hold longer)
- always take pup out in the middle of the night, in the beginning

Dobes are creatures of habit...some will run to the back yard for potty, always taking a similar path.
I put patio stones down - from the side house door / to the rear detached garage door.
(keeps the grass from wearing out and the dog has less chance of picking up mud on its feet)

Finally - Dobes LOVE to PAY, with Mom/Dad/Kids...you will quickly find this out.
ENJOY.
 

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Welcome!

Geez, do I love those Kansa Dobermans....8)

You might check on the DPCA (Doberman Pinscher Club of America) website to see if there are any chapters in your area. You may be able to meet with active Doberman owners to not only get to know more about the breed, but to possibly get some hands-on time with a Doberman or two. Also, you'll have someone in your area to help in case you find yourself needing some hands-on advice (ears, anyone?)!

Just peruse this forum a bit and you'll probably find out more than you ever asked to know about the breed. The most important things to remember, for me, is that our dogs are very intelligent, very active and need a job to do. Positive reinforcement training with steady repetition goes a long, long way. Boundaries, boundaries, boundaries. Familiarize yourself with the "Nothing In Life Is Free" philosophy. This does wonders for dog training or any problems you may encounter.

The best part about being owned by a Doberman, however, is a three-way tie between Dober-nose-pokies, Dober-nub-wiggles, and Dober-chatter-conversations. These are three of my favorites. Welcome in, and don't be afraid to ask for anything!
The MOST important thing you must be comfortable with are the CROTCH hugs!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just to help you pick your house:

It sure is nice to have a tile or washable floor inside every outside doorway. As well as a deck or concrete pad outside of every backyard doorway. An hard and waterproof flooring area for feeding and for keeping dog food bags. At least one room that will have space for a crate and/or dog bed (plus your furniture)--which will also be the same room you will spend most of your time in. An area you can barricade off with a baby gate or two when your dog is young. I have liked my over sized shower stall with a hose nozzle for giving the dog baths.

Perhaps silly suggestions and perhaps not quite what you want, but when you house shop, you might want to consider these.
For the house we are definitely looking at something dog oriented. The backyards are ranging from a 1/4 to 1/2 acre. We will not be getting a house in a HOA neighborhood. I have heard to many bad things, and I like the ability to change things at my leisure.

What is your prior dog experience, and what is your lifestyle like? What is it that appeals to you about the Doberman?

They are often described as a mix between pushy and sensitive, which can be tricky to get used to. Give an inch, these guys will take 5 miles, yet get too aggro with your training and you potentially ruin your bond. It takes a firm, patient, fair, patient, consistent, patient owner to raise these puppies into the amazing adults they can become. ;) I have read that females can be a bit easier for first-time Dobe owners, depending on the female. I'd suggest you work with your breeder to find the right temperamented lady for your lifestyle and what you want in your future companion.

Good luck, read through the educational archives, ask away and THANK YOU for researching!!


DT Educational Archive - Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums

I haved owned two dogs. The latest, (Layla), is a GSD/Rottweiler mix. Unfortunately she died of cancer last year. My first was a yellow lab, (Lovey), my family bought when I was very young. She stuck with me through everything, the best companion anyone could ever ask for. Losing her was the toughest thing I have ever had to deal with. It almost felt like I was losing a family member, or best friend. This is exactly how I pictured her in my life. When I was very young my mother owned a dobe. I remember him being the most loving/loyal dog. To this day I have never heard any bad stories about him.

I am interested in a dobe for two reasons. I am a runner, I normally log 2-3 miles a day. I wanted a dog that strived for physical exercise. The second being that my wife is alone at the house every now and then. Being very protective I want a dog that would be willing to risk his/her life for her and me. I also wanted the dog to be intelligent enough to be able to learn who is a friend, and who is a foe.

My personal life style would be best described as a very dull 22 year old. I have never been a fan of going out partying, drinking, etc. I think I tried my fair share in college, and it just does not appeal to me anymore. I mainly enjoy my hobbies which are running, automotive, camping, fishing, and hiking. I am a mechanic by trade, so this allows me to be very flexible as far as work hours goes. The most the dog would ever see alone is 4-6 hours. A little more background info on myself, my first job was a apprentice trainer at Pet Smart. I know this is not the high quality standard of training, but I feel it gave me the skills to be able to properly train my dogs.

Thanks to everyone who has responded. It is great to see forums are still out there whom are based more on support, and knowledge, than drama.
 

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There are a lot of dobes on here who love to go camping and hiking... but just so you know, you actually might need to get them a fleece coat when you camp! If you've had double-coated breeds previously this probably never crossed your mind, as it didn't mine until I hung out here at DT. ;) (ummmm.. he might also have his own sleeping bag when we go...)

Silas is a perfect running partner - by your side, ignores other obnoxious dogs, keeps pace with you.

It's generally recommended to wait until the dog is 1 1/2 to 2 years old to do any "forced" exercise, meaning leashed, repetitive running/jogging/biking, esp. on pavement. It can do damage to their growth plates and cause problems in the future. I know we were counting down the days ourselves. It's hard to be patient, but for us, an arthritic/stiff dog living in the house at the same time that Si was a puppy gave a visual reminder of the long-term.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
There are a lot of dobes on here who love to go camping and hiking... but just so you know, you actually might need to get them a fleece coat when you camp! If you've had double-coated breeds previously this probably never crossed your mind, as it didn't mine until I hung out here at DT. ;) (ummmm.. he might also have his own sleeping bag when we go...)

Silas is a perfect running partner - by your side, ignores other obnoxious dogs, keeps pace with you.

It's generally recommended to wait until the dog is 1 1/2 to 2 years old to do any "forced" exercise, meaning leashed, repetitive running/jogging/biking, esp. on pavement. It can do damage to their growth plates and cause problems in the future. I know we were counting down the days ourselves. It's hard to be patient, but for us, an arthritic/stiff dog living in the house at the same time that Si was a puppy gave a visual reminder of the long-term.
This is great information, this is the stuff I do not know. As far as camping goes, fall camping she will have a coat of some sort. I remember reading they do not react well to cold.

The excercise part I am interested in. I do not mind waiting to 2 years old to run with my buddy. For them to get adequate excersize as a young adult what would you recommend. Would anything on soft ground suffice? Going to the park and playing around would be perfectly fine for me.
 
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RedMaro, welcome and a very thoughtful writeup.

For me, the best thing you can do with a puppy is to spend much time in the beginning...and mould it with manners & intelligence.
- loads of love, play, socialization and start puppy OB training
Spend the quality time early on, and the rest of the dog raising can be a "walk in the park".

I give my puppy, absolute freedom & access...in the entire home.
- only crate when I am out and my puppy rule is 4 hours alone max.
But this requires supervision & work, but the results can be accelerated with a reduced timeline.
- I will let my pup explore and make a few mistakes, then give positive correction...to learn from
example:
Our puppy went to chew the computer electrical cord on day2...but I was there to stop her with a sharp no.
I substituted a real nice toy to mouth on / problem never happened again.
I view the early pup mistakes as learning opportunities...that last a lifetime.

Decide if pup will be on the living room furniture or off...sleep in the humans bed or not / when your home.
- some young puppies should be taken outside for potty training every hour (others can hold longer)
- always take pup out in the middle of the night, in the beginning

Dobes are creatures of habit...some will run to the back yard for potty, always taking a similar path.
I put patio stones down - from the side house door / to the rear detached garage door.
(keeps the grass from wearing out and the dog has less chance of picking up mud on its feet)

Finally - Dobes LOVE to PAY, with Mom/Dad/Kids...you will quickly find this out.
ENJOY.
My dogs were raised with a minimum of crating too--but I do want to emphasize something here--if you want to let your puppy have free run of the house, you MUST be there, in the SAME room with him as he explores. You will also need to be very careful to make sure all "fun" items like shoes, dirty socks, underwear, stuffed animals or anything chewable or swallowable are picked up and out of reach.

We have always kept our dogs in our bedroom at night (in our bed) and find it easier to maintain their housebreaking at night this way. There is a lot that can be said for crating too, though--if you cannot be there part of the day, or want them to stay out of trouble at night, it will give you some peace of mind to know they are resting somewhere out of trouble.
 

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Don't forget the dog beds when you go camping. They might sleep with you out there, but like hell will they lay on gravel while you sit by the campfire...... :wink:
 

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I wanted to mention that I have trained, loved and lived with several GSD's and australian Shepherds over the years, plus various mixed breeds. I even trained a ScH GSD and Eli, my doberman, was the hardest puppy I have ever trained, bar none. He will be 3 yrs old in December and now he is perfect but boy o boy he was tough as a younger dog. He needed complete consistancy and me to be in charge of him in every way. He was always sweet, not aggressive but he wanted to do his own thing in a way I had never experienced in a pup before. However, because I have a lot of training behind me we were able to work through it all. Dobermans are very focused, once they decide something is interesting or fun it is very difficult to deter them. All that being said, I'm totally in love with my dog, he made me crazy and at times I felt discouraged but now I couldn't ask for a better companion. In fact I am so enamored of him I will be getting a female dobe next year, doing it all over again , glutton for punnishment ;)

As a pup for exercise I took him hiking daily. We hiked in the forest off leash and by the lake. I also trained every day with treats when small and then more formal after 4 months. We also took a leash walks in the neighbor daily except on snowy days. I took him to the park and taught him to fetch, that took a while but he is an excellent fetcher now and it is one of those things he never gets enough of. At this point we have moved and now we don't have access to free mountain hiking very often but we have a wonderful park and we have a pool so he swims and fetches daily. We work full time and are dedicated to getting him the exercise he needs so we get up very early and deal with him after work too. We also walk. He would be a wonderful jogging partner but I don't jog. Good luck with your new house and pup. It sounds like a very exciting time.
 
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