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Pickles (f) - Dachshund/Jack Russell mix Rescue.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone. I'm glad I found this group and looking forward to learning and connecting with folks.

I am a San Diego resident and looking for a Doberman as a first time Doberman owner. I have moderate to severe social anxiety and am looking for a puppy to train for my service dog to help me feel safe and confident in social settings. Dobermans were recommended to me as an ideal breed for service and protection and after thoroughly researching the breed I feel they would be a wonderful companion for my needs. I currently have a 2 year old rescued female dachshund mix, she is such a sweet girl and I take her training very seriously. I have had her since 9 months and have her trained very well however she has severe anxiety due to being abused. I love my girl but sadly she does not have the right temperment for service training.

I am wondering if anyone knows reputable breeders in the SoCal area that may have experience breeding Dobermans for service dogs or any reputable breeders in the area you might recommend.

Closest Breeder to me is Black Barts Dobermans.

Thank you all for your support and advice.
 

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Dobes Dobles +1
Neo Puppy, Lanah Chi-Cairn X 6 y/o, RIP Eva HADR Rescue Dobe, Sunking's Spock, Lillah Chi-Terrier X
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Welcome to DT from San Antonio!

I have no direct experience with using Dobermans as Service Dogs, just as therapy dogs.
Knowledgeable dog persons I work with recommended ServiceDogsExpress as a good resource.
SDE Was founded in San Antonio in 2012 help veterans with PTSD.

Many disabled seniors at Senior Center we used to visit monthly with our Dobes (before Covid), would inquire about getting service dogs for their disabilities.

Hope you get some answers to your search, just hang around!
 
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Pickles (f) - Dachshund/Jack Russell mix Rescue.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome to DT from San Antonio!

I have no direct experience with using Dobermans as Service Dogs, just as therapy dogs.
Knowledgeable dog persons I work with recommended ServiceDogsExpress as a good resource.
SDE Was founded in San Antonio in 2012 help veterans with PTSD.

Many disabled seniors at Senior Center we used to visit monthly with our Dobes (before Covid), would inquire about getting service dogs for their disabilities.

Hope you get some answers to your search, just hang around!
Thank you I will look into that. I have been harrassed in public a few times now either just running errands, jogging, or hiking. I would love to feel safe alone and even just having a Doberman as a well trained companion would be wonderful.
 

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Dobes Dobles +1
Neo Puppy, Lanah Chi-Cairn X 6 y/o, RIP Eva HADR Rescue Dobe, Sunking's Spock, Lillah Chi-Terrier X
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Thank you I will look into that. I have been harrassed in public a few times now either just running errands, jogging, or hiking. I would love to feel safe alone and even just having a Doberman as a well trained companion would be wonderful.
Ironically, in today's extreme animal rights climate, some Doberman owner's with cropped ears and docked tails (the breed standard), get harassed in public because of that!
You might consider a natural eared Dobe for that reason in CA, same companionship and Dobe attitude, just a bit less threatening looking to "those" folks.
 
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Pickles (f) - Dachshund/Jack Russell mix Rescue.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ironically, in today's extreme animal rights climate, some Doberman owner's with cropped ears and docked tails (the breed standard) get harassed in public with them!
You might consider a natural eared Dobe for that reason in CA, same companionship and Dobe attitude, just a bit less threatening looking to "those" folks.
Thank you for the advice, I was curious about that. While it does not bother me that a dog is cropped, (although I do not agree with the practice) I understand it is a breed standard and therefore something I have to accept. I would hate to be harassed more just because I have a dog that I had no control over their appearance. I doubt even putting a service vest on would stop the people from approaching me.
 

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Dobes Dobles +1
Neo Puppy, Lanah Chi-Cairn X 6 y/o, RIP Eva HADR Rescue Dobe, Sunking's Spock, Lillah Chi-Terrier X
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Thank you for the advice, I was curious about that. While it does not bother me that a dog is cropped, (although I do not agree with the practice) I understand it is a breed standard and therefore something I have to accept. I would hate to be harassed more just because I have a dog that I had no control over their appearance. I doubt even putting a service vest on would stop the people from approaching me.
While most reputable Doberrman breeders won't sell uncropped puppies in US (makes hard to resell returned dogs) some might make an exception for Service Dog use in your case.
Backyard breeders (BYB's) will sell natural eared Dobes and leave cropping up to purchaser, which is a bad practice.
That's why you find so many natural eared or badly cropped at Dobermans at breed specific rescues around US, BYB or puppy mills selling Dobermans to families not compatible with or able to handle Dobermans.
You should get approved by a rescue first, so when a suitable dog comes along, you're ready to adopt. Several applications I have filled out are extremely lengthy and probing about persons and dog history in home.
Most of the Doberman rescues are limited to their own state and some to adjacent states, as well.
 
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Pickles (f) - Dachshund/Jack Russell mix Rescue.
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
While most reputable Doberrman breeders won't sell uncropped puppies in US (makes hard to resell returned dogs) some might make an exception for Service Dog use in your case.
Backyard breeders (BYB's) will sell natural eared Dobes and leave cropping up to purchaser, which is a bad practice.
That's why you find so many natural eared or badly cropped at Dobermans at breed specific rescues around US, BYB or puppy mills selling Dobermans to families not compatible with or able to handle Dobermans.
You should get approved by a rescue first, so when a suitable dog comes along, you're ready to adopt. Several applications I have filled out are extremely lengthy and probing about persons and dog history in home.
Most of the Doberman rescues are limited to their own state and some to adjacent states, as well.
Thats good advice for pre-approval thru adoption centers. I would much rather be patient and take the time to wait for the right Dobie than rush into a bad situation for my current animals and put the Dobie through unnecessary stress with a bad match.
 

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I want to share a post by an excellent German Shepherd breeder who uses a service dog and has bred service dogs that I think is SO helpful. Original post is here:

Marcato German Shepherds
Feb 25, 2019·

EDUCATION TIME!
I have been getting a lot of requests for service dog prospects as of late. As someone who has utilized a service dog in the past and will again in the future, I feel the need to explain some things to people.
1. You need to be prepared to put out money for a dog. A well bred dog is not inexpensive (for valid reasons, which I will explain in another ET post).
2. If you purchase a puppy, you need to be fully prepared for it to wash out and you need to know in advance if you plan on keeping the dog as a pet or if you will be returning it to the breeder.
3. If you purchase an adult, you need to be fully prepared for it to wash out and you need to know in advance if you plan on keeping the dog as a pet or if you will be returning it to the breeder.
4. Owner training is extremely hard and the washout rate for dogs is extremely high. I just washed out my 5th prospect. You can not force service work and need to be open to failure. It is strongly recommended you find a professional to work with if a program dog is it an option for you.
5. Many people advise to get a service dog from someone who has produced service dogs. While not bad advice overall, there is a first time for everything, and nobody produces anything (a champion, a sport dog, a pet) until someone buys it from them. Take into consideration the knowledge of the breeder (and their honesty about what they’re producing). There are service dogs that have been produced that have no business being in the working public.
6. Some breeds are better suited for certain work than others. It is getting harder and harder to find a GSD suited for this kind of real life work. And even so, the ones that are suited are better as mobility, hearing ear, and guide dogs. They are not typically recommended to be PSD (psychiatric service dogs) due to their nature of feeding off the handler. Are there exceptions? Of course. But they are just that. Exceptions.
7. If you approach a breeder about a service dog, you needn’t close your disability, but you must be willing and able to disclose what you need the dog for (tasks). The kind of animal that is selected for you is going to vary depending on your needs. A hearing ear dog needs to be more aware of sounds and be keen to cuing off them. A mobility dog is better if it is more aloof and focused on its handler. A guide needs to be aware of its surroundings.
8. Service dogs involve a change to your lifestyle. They are a way to live your life more normally, but they have their cons. Mostly nosy, intrusive people.
I am open to working with disabled people in any way I can, but I cannot promise that a dog I sell you, any one, even with my focus leaning that way, will turn out to be a service dog. There are too many factors, and most of them work against us, unfortunately.
Be realistic about what you need. Be realistic about what you can provide. Be realistic that it may take a great deal of time to find a proper working partner.
I have yet to find my next one. It is an emotionally and financially exhausting search.
Take your time.
 

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Pickles (f) - Dachshund/Jack Russell mix Rescue.
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I want to share a post by an excellent German Shepherd breeder who uses a service dog and has bred service dogs that I think is SO helpful. Original post is here:

Marcato German Shepherds
Feb 25, 2019·

EDUCATION TIME!
I have been getting a lot of requests for service dog prospects as of late. As someone who has utilized a service dog in the past and will again in the future, I feel the need to explain some things to people.
1. You need to be prepared to put out money for a dog. A well bred dog is not inexpensive (for valid reasons, which I will explain in another ET post).
2. If you purchase a puppy, you need to be fully prepared for it to wash out and you need to know in advance if you plan on keeping the dog as a pet or if you will be returning it to the breeder.
3. If you purchase an adult, you need to be fully prepared for it to wash out and you need to know in advance if you plan on keeping the dog as a pet or if you will be returning it to the breeder.
4. Owner training is extremely hard and the washout rate for dogs is extremely high. I just washed out my 5th prospect. You can not force service work and need to be open to failure. It is strongly recommended you find a professional to work with if a program dog is it an option for you.
5. Many people advise to get a service dog from someone who has produced service dogs. While not bad advice overall, there is a first time for everything, and nobody produces anything (a champion, a sport dog, a pet) until someone buys it from them. Take into consideration the knowledge of the breeder (and their honesty about what they’re producing). There are service dogs that have been produced that have no business being in the working public.
6. Some breeds are better suited for certain work than others. It is getting harder and harder to find a GSD suited for this kind of real life work. And even so, the ones that are suited are better as mobility, hearing ear, and guide dogs. They are not typically recommended to be PSD (psychiatric service dogs) due to their nature of feeding off the handler. Are there exceptions? Of course. But they are just that. Exceptions.
7. If you approach a breeder about a service dog, you needn’t close your disability, but you must be willing and able to disclose what you need the dog for (tasks). The kind of animal that is selected for you is going to vary depending on your needs. A hearing ear dog needs to be more aware of sounds and be keen to cuing off them. A mobility dog is better if it is more aloof and focused on its handler. A guide needs to be aware of its surroundings.
8. Service dogs involve a change to your lifestyle. They are a way to live your life more normally, but they have their cons. Mostly nosy, intrusive people.
I am open to working with disabled people in any way I can, but I cannot promise that a dog I sell you, any one, even with my focus leaning that way, will turn out to be a service dog. There are too many factors, and most of them work against us, unfortunately.
Be realistic about what you need. Be realistic about what you can provide. Be realistic that it may take a great deal of time to find a proper working partner.
I have yet to find my next one. It is an emotionally and financially exhausting search.
Take your time.
Thank you for sharing this, lots of great info there to be aware of. I completely agree with everything she says and plan on that as well. My first dog washed out as a service dog but that is ok, she is a wonderful ESA.

While Shepards are wonderful I am highly allergic because of their dense fur, which is why I'm leaning toward the short haired breeds. Even if the Dobie washes out as a service dog, I plan on committing to extensive training with a specialist. So even if they wash out I will still feel confident bringing them most spaces. Of course I hope they work out but I understand it is not a guarantee.
 

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I knew you weren't looking at other breeds, but there was a lot of good information in there about service dogs in general. You can also use the search feature here on DT to find some good recent threads on Dobermans as service dogs. I'm glad you have some prior experience in this area. Here's a really recent thread on the topic, and in that thread I link a couple of other recent, relevant threads. Dobes as Service Dogs

I wish you luck in your search. I'd definitely consider a large search area so that you get the best candidate for the work.
 

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Hello Everyone. I'm glad I found this group and looking forward to learning and connecting with folks.

I am a San Diego resident and looking for a Doberman as a first time Doberman owner. I have moderate to severe social anxiety and am looking for a puppy to train for my service dog to help me feel safe and confident in social settings. Dobermans were recommended to me as an ideal breed for service and protection and after thoroughly researching the breed I feel they would be a wonderful companion for my needs. I currently have a 2 year old rescued female dachshund mix, she is such a sweet girl and I take her training very seriously. I have had her since 9 months and have her trained very well however she has severe anxiety due to being abused. I love my girl but sadly she does not have the right temperment for service training.

I am wondering if anyone knows reputable breeders in the SoCal area that may have experience breeding Dobermans for service dogs or any reputable breeders in the area you might recommend.
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Closest Breeder to me is Black Barts Dobermans.

Thank you all for your support and advice.
Welcome to the forum!
 

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I can't think of a breeder except maybe Scott LeCour (Arista) in Willows but the local Doberman Chapter Club is Aztec DPC of San Diego. Secretary at this time is Hillary Galkin-Griffith--Check DPCA website for contact information.

You can also check DPCA's website for other California breeders--offhand I don't know of any California breeders who have any kind of experience training service dogs--there may be some but starting with a Chapter Club might get you that kind of information.

Good luck and you might also do a search for Dobes as service dog--the question comes up regularly and there are several excellent discussion on the subject. There are definitely downsides to using Dobes as service dogs as well as the fairly obvious up sides (ease of training etc).

dobebug
 

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Recently my neighbor had a terrible car accident and still feels very bad and weak. I was shocked when I heard this news. So we and the other neighbors agreed to help her somehow and we thought it would be perfect to find a service dog. We thought that a Doberman would be the best option. So we searched a lot on the internet ,but didn't find anything useful. My daughter helped us and advised to look on a website ,where we can have and read a lot about dog training and dog groomer: How to Become a Dog Groomer . I still think that the best option is to find her a dog that always will be with her, and to lead her.
 

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Recently my neighbor had a terrible car accident and still feels very bad and weak. I was shocked when I heard this news. So we and the other neighbors agreed to help her somehow and we thought it would be perfect to find a service dog.
While I understand the impulse but have you and her neighbors actually discussed the possibility of a service dog for your neighbor? Does she have a dog of any kind now? Could it be trained as a service dog? Has she ever had dogs?

I'd think that for a non dog person you'd want an easier breed than a Dobe for a service dog--I'd suggest looking into a Golden, Lab or even Australian Shepherd. You should read some of the discussions about Dobes as service dogs--there are a lot of reasons they aren't the best choice for most people.

Also is you are considering an adult fully trained service animal--they are pricey--which is why a lot of people get puppies via a service dog organization and then get help training the dog to be their service dog. But the first thing you all should be doing is discussing it with your neighbor--she may not even want a dog.

dobebug
 
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