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Dakota has started a new, not so good, little habit. She has started playfully nipping...its really kind of a nibble. She only does this with us, her family. One of us will come home and she will run up to us, greeting, wagging, happy...we start to walk away and she comes up and gives a little nibble on our behind :confused: We are still working on jumping up, and sometimes she will jump up on one of my kids (8 and 11) and give a little nibble on them :( We have tried telling her no, while holding her mouth, but it doesn't seem to be working. We also tried just turning our backs on her, but since she is nibbling the behind, that is not very effective.

I am doing classes with her right now, she gets a daily walk and a daily training session at home. It doesn't seem to be an excess of energy problem. I do need this to stop quickly, specifically with the kids. Has anyone else had this issue? Any suggestions?
 

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I havent had this issue myself. I will say that we have an issue with my grandpup, Dexter, jumping when you come home. Some terriers are major jumpers IMO for some of them its just what they do. So for him what we have done is not move or turn around but try to get a default behavior of sit. So I am thinking when she comes ignore her until she sits. Then she can have a pet. If she knows sit you can tell her and then reward. IMO if you do clicker training she will learn the routine quicker and retain it more. When I come I dont talk to my dogs or give pets right away. I act like I have been home the whole time. Walk and put up my things maybe make a glass of water and make my way to the back door to let them out. I try to keep it a very calm routine which keeps the dogs from getting overly excited.
 

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Well the jumping up on your back is not good manners and unacceptable. Does she jump on the backs of your children? Does the nibbling hurt?

When we come home the rule is 4 (paws) on the floor before attention is given. Maybe when she does that you could whirl around and say "Excuse Me! Sit!" to remind her.

When she sits tell her "now that's a very good girl!" then treat so she will make the association that good behavior gets the reward.

Also, both of my dobermans were/are nibblers. Sabrina will nibble my elbows with her front teeth at times to tell me that she wants something. Usually to play or go for a walk. But it doesn't hurt.

My last doberman would put my whole arm in her mouth and nibble with her back teeth, but again, very soft and would never hurt.

Sabrina's also a jumper when she's excited. When she was young she would jump on you but after training her to not jump on you, she now just jumps in the air.

Every single time we walk out of the ring at a match or a show she gets so proud of herself and jumps in the air.
 

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Toby is a nibbler, he does it when he wants attention, he does it when we are grooming him, he does it when we give him cuddles. I always associate it with what a horse does, they kind of nibble you when they are bonding, ie, a subservient horse will do it to the alpha mare.
I have never placed much value on holding a dogs mouth, more often than not they object to it by pulling away and it then causes more problems than it solves. You may need in the future to have to examine your dogs mouth and if he/she associates it with being punished. Well you get the idea I am sure.
When Toby's nibbling gets a little too harsh we saw OW! and pull away as if we are hurt, he instantly stops, when a dog nibbles another they will do the same thing if the nibbling hurts. Dogs are sociable animals and I think your dog is simply including you in the ritual of grooming, greeting as if you were a dog. Try yelping when he/she does it, tell the kids to do the same. It works for me and my boy so you never know it may work for your Dobe and family too.
Regards the jumping up, the only way I have found to stop Toby, (he usually does it at full speed as he is zooming around) though admittedly he still sneaks in a couple every now and then, is I stand firm and say No! as he approaches. I also show the flat of my hand to him as if to say STOP, (like a police officer might when directing traffic). When he stops I then tell him to sit and reward him. If he jumps when we have our back to him we turn around and tell him, NO! and then command he SIT! again we reward if he does it, if he doesnt then we tell him 'we don't like him,' and turn away. With Toby it works a treat.
Good luck.
 

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My O.B. was a pincher. :)

one of her sons was too.

they never pinched anyone but their owner/s.

good luck with your pincher.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well the jumping up on your back is not good manners and unacceptable. Does she jump on the backs of your children? Does the nibbling hurt?

When we come home the rule is 4 (paws) on the floor before attention is given. Maybe when she does that you could whirl around and say "Excuse Me! Sit!" to remind her.

When she sits tell her "now that's a very good girl!" then treat so she will make the association that good behavior gets the reward.

Also, both of my dobermans were/are nibblers. Sabrina will nibble my elbows with her front teeth at times to tell me that she wants something. Usually to play or go for a walk. But it doesn't hurt.

My last doberman would put my whole arm in her mouth and nibble with her back teeth, but again, very soft and would never hurt.

Sabrina's also a jumper when she's excited. When she was young she would jump on you but after training her to not jump on you, she now just jumps in the air.

Every single time we walk out of the ring at a match or a show she gets so proud of herself and jumps in the air.
It will sometimes hurt, it is like a pinch. Thanks everyone for the responses. I think coming home, specifically with my kids, will have to be a lot more structured. In other areas she shows the ability to show manners, just not in this situation :) I have told the kids to yelp, didn't seem to make a difference. Maybe amp it up to a full scream?
 

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After watching an episode of the dog whisperer, I did what ceasar did with jumping and excited dogs.

As soon as you enter the house, don't stand around and let the dogs go psycho.

Shut the door and without giving them/he/she an ounce of attention, walk away, or through them if you have to, and go about your normal routine for when you get home. No hesitation, no pausing, no second guessing. Eyes forward, shut the door and immediately proceed elsewhere, other than right in front of the door.

No eye contact, pretend they aren't even there. No speaking, nothing period.

This took all of a few days and my dogs bad habit was broken. I can't say the same for my roommate, as she is a knucklehead and will try to tell our little girl to stop or sit, or get down...

No words, no eye contact, nothing.

Shouldn't take more than a few minutes for the dogs to calm down.

Worked like a charm for me and I use that method everyday. My only problem is that train of thought isn't reciprocated by my roommate or her parents. Her parents think the jumping is cute and adorable. Albeit our little girl is the most precious sweetheart in the world...that's why we named her sweets, but jumping and raising up to put paws on you is a no go in my home, unless it is invited.

For the light pinches, I would turn around immediately and give a stern 'HEY', followed by a correction. The appropriate correction would be to encroach on the dogs personal bubble until they submit to you by either sitting or relaxing in some way, then immediately turn around and walk away.

Has to be immediate. Everything correction wise, whether using ceasars methods or positive reinforcement, etc., needs to be fast, no delays.
 
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