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I just adopted a 2 year old doberman. He is doing pretty good, I just would like help with two things. One I have hard time keeping him under control when he is on a walk, Everything attracts his attention and he starts to pull towards it. Second, I have to leave him in the backyard when im at work and he will jump on the door. How can I stop both of these activities. Help please.
 

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Welcome to the site. Here's a video to watch about the pulling. While this video is called "Barking" the concept still applies, and you can try the same thing to stop the pulling.

YouTube - kikopup's Channel

In regards to getting in trouble while left alone, until you're very confident that nothing will happen, the dog should not be left alone outside all day. Without knowing what previous training was like, and how the dog behaves otherwise, I wouldn't trust a new dog to be outside by itself. I would use a crate, or some type of pen to keep the dog inside until you're confident that nothing will happen. Don't get into the habit of leaving yoru dog outside alone all day, bad habbits can be developing that you don't even know about. Best of luck
 

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I also would not recommend leaving a new dog outside by himself all day. Crate or x-pen is the way to go until he's trustworthy in the house. He's jumping at the door because he wants inside. If you've got to leave a dog outside all day, make sure he's got adequate shelter and that you don't have neighbors or passersby that might mess with your dog, or steal him. When I was home and my first Dobe was out back sunning, I caught some neighbor kids teasing him through the fence with a stick. That's a situation that could turn ugly in a hurry, not to mention teaching your dog to be reactive and aggressive, if you're not there to stop it. Also, Dobes aren't good outside dogs, they're short coated and like being warm.

You've also just adopted a dog who doesn't know you from a hole in the wall yet. Rescues are fantastic, thank you very much for giving this guy a home. Just remember, he needs to get used to you and his new home, to settle in. I would sign up for an obedience class for sure. Two years old still has a bit of Doberteen brain in, and it's likely that he'll start trying to figure out what the rules are and if you'll be consistent and fair in training. Still has a bit of growing up to do, too.

Post pics if you want to, we love photos!
 

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Hello!

First of all I'd like to say thank you for rescueing a Doberman :) .

I agree with the first 2 posts, he is a short coated dog and is also in a new environment so he shouldn't be left alone outside. Putting him in an approriate sized crate would be ideal, at least until you know how he is inside the house, and he gets to know his surroundings. If you get to know he is good in the house you can always put him in an enclosed room that doesnt have anything that could harm him. My guy, Jax, has come to love his crate, he didn't like it at first but with simple things such as feeding them in their crate, or putting them in their crate with a kong and peanut butter for 15 minutes.

I also agree with the above post in saying you should enroll in some sort of obedience. It can help alot with him learning to walk with distractions around, along with a lot of other things. If you can't afford training right now there are plenty of methods you can try for the pulling such as completely changing directions as soon as he starts to pull ahead, use a training collar, practice quickly changing directions or walking staggered, stopping alot during your walks to make your dog sit. All of those methods should help your dog focus on you more.

Good Luck, and remember to be completely %100 consistant because Dobes can be quite stubborn :p
 

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Thanks for the advice

Thank you all for the advice, And i will trying to figure out something other than keeping him outside, he is a awesome dog though, He is already easily becoming my best friend. What do you guys think about keep him in my room, I did that the other day and he did perfect, no incidents at all. He was in there for at least 3hrs. too.
 

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Thank you all for the advice, And i will trying to figure out something other than keeping him outside, he is a awesome dog though, He is already easily becoming my best friend. What do you guys think about keep him in my room, I did that the other day and he did perfect, no incidents at all. He was in there for at least 3hrs. too.
That's hard to say without knowing what he's like... If he is ok being left alone in the house, then at his age there's nothing wrong with leaving him out. I would keep a good eye on him for a while though, make sure he's not eating things, getting into trouble, etc. It's hard when you have a rescue that's 2 years old, especially if you don't know what he has been treated like and how he has been trained previously. But at this point, you would be able to ansewr that better than us.

When I am building up the trust to leave a dog out, I do it in small spurts... With a young puppy, I would never, ever, ever take my eyes off of them. And I do mean never. As they get older, and start to build my trust in them, I may leave them alone to go to the bathroom, or wash some dishes, or put something in a different room, and see how it goes. If after a bunch of times, all goes well, I will step it up a little bit. Maybe run to the store for 5 minutes, go do something outside, take a shower, etc. How much freedom the dog gets depends on the dog... If I take a shower, and things get destroyed, then that tells me that he/she can't reliably left for that long. If after a week of showering with the dog left out, nothing happens, then I may try to run an errand or 2. After a few errands, I may stay out a little longer. So, it all depends on your dog and how he reacts to you not being there. But again, at that age, if he is reliable, and trust him, there's no reason why he can't be left out in a SAFE place. Outside, too many things can go wrong. We read too many stories of punk ass kids throwing rocks at dogs, neighbors terrorizing them, etc. And you never know...
 

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I agree with all the above, and agree with Kevin that building the trust takes time and gradually increasing the time allowed out. A crate is really a great idea because there may be times you cannot put him outside but he must be crated for his safety or someone else's. Crate training is not difficult and it's not cruel. You can begin by putting a nice comfy blanket in there and only give him treats when he's sitting or laying there. Let him go in and out when he wants. The put him in, tell him to sit, and close the door. Treat him. Then do the same thing and walk away. If he's quiet, turn back and treat him. Then try leaving the room, etc. Give him Kong filled with PB and kibble only in the crate and leave the room for 20 minutes. Each time longer. They learn quick. It's a much safer alternative rather than being outside. And you just never know when a child or just someone comes to visit that your dog absolutely does not like. Being safe always beats being sorry.
 
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