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I keep looking through the rescues for a young dobe girl to live with me, hubby, kids 16 and 13, and choco lab boy who is 8. Every time I see a nice one, I think of all of the unknown health issues, temperament issues, etc, and I chicken out.

Like this one:
Petfinder Adoptable Dog | Doberman Pinscher | Tehachapi, CA | Ariel

She seems perfect, maybe a little far away from Santa Cruz for me to go see, but I keep thinking of all of the unknowns. Advice?
 

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Are you able to work with a rescue and perhaps foster? Perhaps you could become a foster failure. :D

Your concerns can be found in any dog, not just a rescue. There are many wonderful dobes waiting for good homes.
 

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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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I'm wondering if the fact that you're finding problems and concerns with each possible rescue dog means that you're not QUITE sure you want a dobe or aren't quite ready to take another dog on or that perhaps the reasons for getting another dog are not ones you yourself are entirely sure about.

I'd give the above a bit of thought to see if there is uncertainty going on that really has nothing to do with the actual rescue dog itself, because you certainly don't want to find out the time isn't right for another dog AFTER you bring one home.

If all is clear after re-examination, you may just have to take the plunge

So come on in; the water's fine!!
 

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The pictures of her make me smile ^^

I also like her name. If nothing else, meet her. On your own, take your family, take your labby lad. See how it goes!
 

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The point of rescue is to save a life and help the rescue to save more lives by your adoption donation. Generally people who adopt understand that they are not getting a champion bred dog with an impressive pedigree. A well-bred Doberman could drop dead at any age, so could you or any member of your family. If temperament is important, get involved with an obedience class and work towards training goals with the new dog. Just some food for thought :)
 

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If you and your family are ready and prepared for another dog (A dobie!) then I would heartily encourage you to seek out a rescue. That girl is beautiful! Now, just a suggestion, if you are very very concerned about health problems, maybe look for a Dobie mixed breed? I know they come into rescues often. Good luck! :nicejob:
 

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Personally I have found more joy in my rescue girl than the long sleepless nights of when our lab was a puppy, I found it amazing watching her grow into her own in front of my eyes as she became healthier, happier and more social. I think with every dog there is a risk of health & temperament, But with rescues there is an added reward of saving a dog. :) Good Luck
 

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I think the main issue is if the rescue can get along with your existing dog and children. It there are known health issues for this particular dog, they would tell you. Otherwise, life is a crapshoot.
 

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Whilst some rescues do need a little more "work" than others....not all do! ....and the remedial training that is required is usually of a superficial nature...patience and consistency is all it takes....which is the same demand as raising a pup. However, unlike raising a pup...there is a special added quality to watching a rescue reach milestone achievements and develop into sound loving dogs...knowing that it has been your love and dedication that has given them the opportunity to shine. ...and somehow an even deeper; more emotional bond is formed....it's hard to explain until you experience it, but I would encourage anyone thinking of adopting a rescue, to seek out a good reputable rescue that can match the right dog for you, and go for it! It's a sublime relationship!
 

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Are you able to work with a rescue and perhaps foster? Perhaps you could become a foster failure. :D

Your concerns can be found in any dog, not just a rescue. There are many wonderful dobes waiting for good homes.
Working with a reputable rescue is your best bet. A good rescue knows their dogs and will be able to help you find a dog that fits your family. Getting involved as a volunteer (even just helping with events to start out) is a great way to get to know the breed better and meet some of the dogs. If you are willing to foster, that is a great way to find the right dog for your family.

I'm wondering if the fact that you're finding problems and concerns with each possible rescue dog means that you're not QUITE sure you want a dobe or aren't quite ready to take another dog on or that perhaps the reasons for getting another dog are not ones you yourself are entirely sure about.

I'd give the above a bit of thought to see if there is uncertainty going on that really has nothing to do with the actual rescue dog itself, because you certainly don't want to find out the time isn't right for another dog AFTER you bring one home.

If all is clear after re-examination, you may just have to take the plunge

So come on in; the water's fine!!
I think this is a great point. If you're more hesitant about each dog you look at than excited about the possibilities, maybe you just aren't ready yet. And that's completely okay. Again, fostering might give you a better idea of whether you are truly ready for another dog or not.

I think the main issue is if the rescue can get along with your existing dog and children. It there are known health issues for this particular dog, they would tell you. Otherwise, life is a crapshoot.
Rescue dogs are certainly unknown, but with health issues in this breeder even a dog from an ethical breeder may end up with health issues. You just have to accept that you can't know their background and plan accordingly. Make sure you have a generous "vet fund" for any issues that might come up. Make sure you have thoroughly researched the health issues that are common in the breed and know whether you are prepared to deal with them, should they arise. Be sure to do thorough health screenings with your vet on a regular basis.

I adopted my rescue, Simon, almost a year ago, when he was eight years old. As a rescue, and a senior, I knew I might not have a long time with him, and that he may have some health issues that I would have to deal with. I have spent quite a bit of money on him (he had a health scare about a month ago), but not more than I have spent on my non-rescue girl. Either of them could have issues and I just have to be ready to deal with them.

Simon is worth every penny I spent on him. I waited a long time to find the right dog for us, and wasn't sure we'd ever find the right fit. I am involved with Doberman Rescue MN, fostered several dogs for them (loved quite a few, but they weren't right for us), and Simon eventually found us. He fit into the household perfectly from day one. He's awesome, and I don't regret adopting him at all.
 

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If you live your life wondering 'what if,' and 'should I' fact is you will never do anything. You could spend thousands on a Dobe and it still have health problems, there are no guarentees in life. Did you have such qualims about getting your Lab? They have tremendous health issues no more, no less than Dobes. You may get a rescue and it be fine, you may get a rescue and it have health problems and you may step out of your house tomorrow and get hit by a bus.

The choice of course is yours, but I bet you walk out your front door come the morning.

By the way, she looks gorgeous.
 

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I adopted an 8 year old, neutered, but not current on inoculations, needed weight, etc, After 4 months I can't even begin to imagine why he had 6 homes in 8 years! He truly is an example of WHY to rescue! Don't think of "what if" There is no gurantee to life or health of any species. He is testing for his CGC in 2 weeks, just because! If you find a dog that you mesh with, take advantage of that, looks are not important! My "ole boy" has a pointed head, bowed front legs, the worst top line, a botched tail, but he is absolutely incredible in more ways that I could begin to say. If he should die tomorrow, I know that I have given him the very best and he in return has offered nothing less! I should also mention that he is wonderful with the other dogs, 9, 7 and 5 and has truly bonded with my 5 year old boy. They are basically inseparable.
 

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two great experiences

I rescued my 1st doberman, a red girl (Olivia), from DobieSOS in Tehachapi four years ago. She and I bonded so amazingly that I kept looking back at DobieSOS, just to see if there was a male that would fit. So just this past November we adopted our beautiful boy, Bishop. He isn't quite as needy as Olivia so he hasn't bonded as quickly but he is definitely a member of our family. Go ahead and email Susan, she is great to work with and helped us with our adoption process. She even met us once in Visalia and once in Porterville so that we wouldn't have to drive so far. When we introduced Bishop to Olivia, we met in a neutral place and were very careful of how much access they had to each other and now they play and hang out together most of the time. I hope you'll at least get in touch via email with DobieSOS and see what happens. Good luck!
 
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