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Discussion Starter #1
i came home today an he pooped all in his crate wich is extremely weird. He's house trained, but i just brought him out because he had to poop again & it came out loose, an then he just sat there in his stance an a bunch of clear liquid just dripped out!! an he walked a bit more an more liquid just dripped out, its clear. He's exactly 5months old, male & about 40lbs. He MIGHT have gotten into our trash an had a nibble of raw chicken earlier about 2pm today but other than that he's been on his regular play/nap scheduele. Any thought??
 

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i came home today an he pooped all in his crate wich is extremely weird. He's house trained, but i just brought him out because he had to poop again & it came out loose, an then he just sat there in his stance an a bunch of clear liquid just dripped out!! an he walked a bit more an more liquid just dripped out, its clear. He's exactly 5months old, male & about 40lbs. He MIGHT have gotten into our trash an had a nibble of raw chicken earlier about 2pm today but other than that he's been on his regular play/nap scheduele. Any thought??
Vet
 

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If he seems to feel well (playing, drinking, active and "up"), I would pobably wait and see how he is tomorrow. I might let him skip a meal, and then feed one half mushy white rice (cook a little longer than called for with some extra water) and one half sauted ground meat well drained. If that goes well for one or two meals, back to his regular food.

If he seems to feel "off" you might want to skip the wait-and-see and take him to his vet.

I suspect that the fluid he expelled was from his anal glands, and due to straining.
 

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If he seems generally fine in himself, is drinking and hungry I would see how he is later in the day or in the morning. If he seems lethargic, isn't drinking, doesn't want to get up or any ther strange behaviour, I'd call te vet straight away. Hope he fela better soon!
 

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From someone who just had a similar issue with my 6 month old pup keep an eye on him. Diesels poop went from runny to clear, slimy to blood in it and we had to go to the e-vet. Luckily it was just an inflammed colon but I would not feed him and let his system run its course and maybe add some rice and some hamburger meat (drained) to his meal. Also if it doesn't clear up go to the vet and make sure he's drinking. They can get dehydrated fast. Hopefully it's a different thing and he just has an upset tummy from getting into something.

Good luck! Hope he feels better soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
THANKS alot guys for all the feedback, He is very much himself, just his poop was weird. He's having normal diarhea an no more white liquid at least. I fed him a smaller portion dismoring & alot of water & he only pee'd so far so i'll update what it comes out. If it solids back up A LITTLE i wont be calling the vet but if its staying the same i'm going to call the vet tonight after i give him rice an see how that goes.
 

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I wouldn't feed his kibble, if that is what you are doing. You should feed the mix mmctaq suggested. The watery overcooked rice mix, called rice congee, is soothing to the stomach and intestinal tract, kibble is not.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So his stool when back to normal today for one poop, then it got all loose an slushy again an just poured out of his butt.....I have no clue whats going on, should i try the vet?
 

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Take him to the vet. Do not pass Go, do not collect $200. There are any number of very serious things that this could be. Better safe than sorry.
 

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Vet! Now! I had a lot of poop issues with Diesel and I'm telling you it's not a good idea to wait. I never wait with Diesel. Its not something to mess around with. It could be something simple to something serious but you need to get it figured out.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
He's been staying overnight at the animal hospital, they have no clue. All there saying is it seems to be an upset stomach but its not going away so it MUST be something else. He's gotten xrayed, blood sample, etc everythings seems to be coming out normal. I dont like the sounds of this. His breeder is there with me an all his other puppies he called their owners & everythings A OK. Hopefully it clears up!? But he's being closely watched 24/7.
 

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maybe the food he is eating is not agreeing with him, what kibble were you feeding him? When my pup was getting mushy poo it was because there was more than a couple of things in his food that he was allergic to causing him to have a firm poo for a couple of nugget size drops then it turned into mush then it turned into a clear liquid. I knew for a fact that he had no obstruction as I was watching him like a hawk and he didn't show any of the signs of obstruction. I changed foods and everything went back to normal.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've been feeding him ol'roy since he got off his puppy food. I know alot of people think ol'roy is not a good grade but my gf's 21yr old black lab mix says otherwise....can he just become allergic? we've been feeding him the same since he's got to the vet. They didnt say anything about being alergic to food because he's been eating it for 2-3months without a problem.
 

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I've been feeding him ol'roy since he got off his puppy food. I know alot of people think ol'roy is not a good grade but my gf's 21yr old black lab mix says otherwise....can he just become allergic? we've been feeding him the same since he's got to the vet. They didnt say anything about being alergic to food because he's been eating it for 2-3months without a problem.
ouch ol'roy, I suggest you try to feed him a higher quality kibble. They can become allergic. My boy didn't show his reaction until he was 9 months old, he had horrid gas but I was still learning about dog food and why he was having such bad gas.

Dobermans tend to have a sensitive stomach than most breeds so just because your gf's dog does well on that food doesn't mean that your pup will do good on it.
 
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Sorry but your Doberman is not a lab Ole Roy is a terrible food main ingredient usually corn,wheat,soy are all items dogs can be allergic too. Yes Ole Roy is cheap but you will have to feed allot more of it than a better quality food.You may be making allot of trips to the vet feeding that food. Most of the dog foods at grocery stores are not good Beneful has pretty pictures on the outside of the bag.You need to read the ingredients on the back of the bag learn to be a informed Dog person I have been reading dog food bags for about 40 years.
Ol’ Roy Dog Food (Dry)
by Mike Sagman
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Rating: ★☆☆☆☆

Ol’ Roy dog food earns the Advisor’s lowest rating of one star.

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The Ol’ Roy Dog Food product line includes about six kibbles… each designed to meet AAFCO nutrient profiles for all life stages.

Because we were unable to locate a dedicated Ol’ Roy website, the stock of our local WalMart store was used as a source of some of the data reported here.

Ol’ Roy Puppy Complete
Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition
Ol’ Roy Skin and Coat Formula
Ol’ Roy Krunchy Bites and Bones
Ol’ Roy High Performance Nutrition
Ol’ Roy Kibbles Chunks and Chews

Ol’ Roy Complete Nutrition dry dog food was selected to represent the others in the line for this review.

Ol' Roy Complete Nutrition

Dry Dog Food

Estimated Dry Matter Nutrient Content



Ingredients: Ground yellow corn, meat and bone meal, soybean meal, chicken by-product meal, wheat middlings, animal fat [preserved with BHA and citric acid], natural flavor, brewers rice, salt, calcium carbonate, potassium chloride, choline chloride, color added [red #40, yellow #5, blue #2], zinc sulfate, vitamin E supplement, ferrous sulfate, zinc oxide, niacin, copper sulfate, vitamin A supplement, biotin, manganous oxide, calcium pantothenate, vitamin B12 supplement, thiamine mononitrate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, menadione sodium bisulfite complex [source of vitamin K activity], riboflavin supplement, sodium selenite, calcium iodate, folic acid, vitamin D3 supplement, cobalt carbonate

Fiber (estimated dry matter content) = 4.5%

Red items when present indicate controversial ingredients
Estimated Nutrient Content
Method Protein Fat Carbs
Guaranteed Analysis 21% 10% NA
Dry Matter Basis 24% 11% 57%
Calorie Weighted Basis 22% 26% 52%

The first ingredient in this dog food is corn. Now, contrary to what you may have heard, corn isn’t necessarily a bad ingredient.

On the other hand, although there’s no way to know for sure here, the corn used in making many pet foods can be similar to the kind used to make feed for livestock.

And that can sometimes be problematic.

What’s more, corn is commonly linked to canine food allergies1.

For these reasons, we rarely consider corn a preferred component in any dog food.

The second ingredient is meat and bone meal… a dry “rendered product from mammal tissues, including bone, exclusive of blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents”.2

Meat and bone meal has a lower digestibility than most other meat meals.

Scientists believe this decreased protein quality may be due to the ingredient’s higher ash and lower essential amino acid content.3

What’s worse, this particular item is anonymous. It doesn’t even specify the source animal.

Even though meat and bone meals are still considered protein-rich meat concentrates, we do not consider a generic ingredient like this a quality item.

The third ingredient is soybean meal. Soybean meal is actually a usable by-product. It’s what remains of soybeans after all the oil has been removed.

Soybean meal contains 48% protein. However, compared to meat, this item is considered an inferior plant-based protein providing a lower biological value.

The fourth item lists chicken by-product meal… a dry rendered product of slaughterhouse waste. It’s made from what’s left of a slaughtered chicken after all the prime cuts have been removed.

In a nutshell, chicken by-products are those unsavory leftovers usually considered “unfit for human consumption”.

In addition to organs (the nourishing part), this stuff can contain almost anything… feet, beaks, undeveloped eggs… anything (that is) except skeletal muscle (real meat).

On the brighter side, by-product meals are meat concentrates and contain nearly 300% more protein than fresh chicken.

The fifth ingredient lists wheat middlings… commonly known as “wheat mill run”. Though it may sound wholesome, wheat mill run is actually an inexpensive by-product of cereal grain processing.

In reality, middlings are nothing more than milling dust and floor sweepings.

The sixth item lists animal fat. Animal fat is a generic by-product of rendering… the same high-temperature process used to make meat meals.

Since there’s no mention of a specific animal, this item could come from almost anywhere… restaurant grease, slaughterhouse waste, diseased cattle… even euthanized pets.

What’s worse, this fat is preserved with BHA… a suspected cancer-causing agent (carcinogen).

We do not consider generic animal fat (especially when it’s been preserved in this manner) a quality ingredient.

After the natural flavor, we find brewers rice.

Brewers rice represents the small grain fragments left over after milling whole rice.

This is an inexpensive cereal grain by-product and not considered a quality ingredient.

We’re always disappointed to find artificial coloring in any dog food.

Coloring is used to make the product more appealing to you… not your dog. After all, do you really think your dog cares what color his food is?

From here, the list goes on to include a number of other items.

But to be realistic, ingredients located this far down the list (other than nutritional supplements) are not likely to affect the overall rating of this product.

With three notable exceptions…

First, we find no mention of probiotics… friendly bacteria applied to the surface of the kibble after processing.

Next, the minerals listed here do not appear to be chelated. And that can make them more difficult to absorb. Non-chelated minerals are usually associated with lower quality dog foods.

And lastly, this Ol’ Roy dog food product contains menadione… a controversial form of vitamin K linked to liver toxicity, allergies and the abnormal break-down of red blood cells.

Ol’ Roy Dry Dog Food
The Bottom Line

What a shameful collection of man-made additives and agricultural waste. Simply judging by its ingredients alone, Ol’ Roy Dog Food certainly has the look of an inferior kibble.

But ingredient quality by itself cannot tell the whole story. We still need to estimate the product’s meat content before determining a final rating.

The dashboard displays a dry matter protein reading of 24%, a fat level of 11% and estimated carbohydrates of about 57%.

As a group, the brand features an average protein content of 27% and a mean fat level of 13%. Together, these figures suggest a carbohydrate content of 53% for the overall product line.

Near-average protein. Below-average fat. And above-average carbs when compared to a typical dry dog food.

In addition, when you consider the plant-based protein-boosting effect of the soybean meal, this looks like the profile of a kibble containing only a modest amount of meat.

What’s more, it’s difficult to ignore the unusual abundance of so many critical Red Flag items.

Bottom line?

Ol’ Roy Dog Food is a grain-based dry kibble using only a modest amount of meat and bone meal as its main source of animal protein… thus earning the brand one star.

Not recommended.

A Final Word

This review is designed to help you make a more informed decision when buying dog food. However, our rating system is not intended to suggest feeding a particular product will result in specific health benefits for your pet.

For a better understanding of how we analyzed this product, please be sure to read our article, “The Problem with Dog Food Reviews”

Remember, no dog food can possibly be appropriate for every life stage, lifestyle or health condition. So, choose wisely. And when in doubt consult a veterinarian for help.

Have an opinion about this dog food… or maybe the review itself? Please know… we welcome your comments.

Notes and Updates

10/30/2010 Original review
10/30/2010 Last Update

White, S., Update on food allergy in the dog and cat, World Small Animal Veterinary Association, Vancouver, 2001 ↩
Adapted by the Dog Food Advisor and based upon the official definition for beef published by the Association of American Feed Control Officials, 2008 Edition ↩
Shirley RB and Parsons CM, , Effect of Ash Content on Protein Quality of Meat and Bone Meal, Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois, Poultry Science, 2001 80: 626-632 ↩

Dog Food Advisor IconThe Dog Food Advisor publishes independent reviews to help pet owners make better choices when shopping for dog food.

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Tagged as: adult, all life stages, dry, puppy, senior

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If he got an upset tummy or colitis going back to kibble too soon can definitely cause the problems he's having. Did you try the rice and ground beef on him. It's not going to be immediate but it will give his gut the chance to decrease the inflammation. Hopefully this is what the vets are doing. Sometimes that can be just it.

As far as the kibble, the best food for your dog is the food it does the best on but your dog would have to have a pretty solid gut to handle all the grains in Ol Roy. I don't care what anybody else has to say, dobermans don't have the strongest guts. (It's been argued before that this is not a doberman trait and while maybe not technically, it seems prevelent enough that it sure does seem very common.) While 21 years is a very impressive age for a lab, I'm not sure I'd give all the credit to the food and does not mean your dog will live even half that long on it. After this gut incident, I'd strongly look into a food with much less carbs, grains and starches. While his belly may or may not be able to handle high protein, the digestion of (or difficulty digesting) the grains and starches in Ol Roy can definitely trigger an inflammatory response. Aside from a partial obstruction, which sounds unlikely, I'm likely to believe that is what is happening here.
 
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