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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are moving from an apartment to a little farm with a 2 acre yard. Our dog has spent all of his life with us in an apartment, and this is a huge change.

Years ago we moved to a home with a yard with 2 other dobermans and they seemed to 'go wild' with the freedom, not minding us, etc.

Dante is a house dog, and has almost always been on a leash when we have walked him. He spends most of his day sleeping, except on his very regular walks. He generally doesn't bark.

Does anyone have any advice as to how to make the transition better? How can we get him used to the large yard without losing the obedience and submission? He is by nature a dominant dog, which we have worked hard in ranking order so he minds my husband, me, and even our four children.

Any advice would be appreciated.
 

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I am also moving out to the country, like in June, of this year - doing major reno now.
- can hardly wait, property is 1.15 acres and only 2 miles from the edge of our city
- still close to Tim Hortons...He-He

I perimeter trained our Amy off-leash, as a pup - so our move will be seamless.
But I have help others before, to keep their dog, at home.
On your new property, do the daily on-leash training....and your path should be on the property line and along the front lawn edge, close to the roadway.
This should help your dobe, to understand the scope of his new lot / home.
Fully supervised with a good recall, the on-leash work, goes into off-leash mode.

Disclaimer - that is how I would do it, but I am coaching over the internet - don't rush to fast, and have your dog hit by a car / it will take your undivided attention.
 

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When i moved from my apartment to home with a yard (less than 1/2 acre), unfenced, I think i just had her on a leash for a while, she has always had a great recall though and prior to living with me lived out in the country and was always off leash.
When i moved back to the "city", I tried letting her off lead the first week or so and she was SO excited she went tearing down the sidewalk- thank goodness she likes me enough to come when called LOL. So i thought for sure our off lead time was kaputz. We have been here 13 months and last night for the first time since last January, I let her off, and she stayed in the yard!! YAY!! Success, Im sure she would have been ok after a couple of months but i just couldnt risk it because although she still mostly came when called, she was really slacking and i couldnt risk having her blow me off in a neighbourhood with lots of kids and dogs and close neighbours.
So i suggest a long leash for a while- set him up for success- he cant blow you off if he's attatched to you.
 

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Another tip - going from on-leash to off.

Interm step:
Let your boy roam the yard, dragging a 6ft. leash - around the property (for a while)..still being watched 100%.
- always easy to step on the end of the leash (stop dogs, in its tracks), vs. trying to get a hold of a loose dog, running at large
- dobe will view this minor restriction, as formal training and accept given responsibily (with you in charge) or be subject to blow-off consequences (for its actions)
You set up the rules for success...failure cannot be an option !!
- smart breed dogs...get the cause & effect reasons (fairly easy)...and thats what makes them grow into reliable & trusted dogs
 

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Walk the perimter with him

We live in a rural area with about five acres between the lawn and rough hay area. What always seemed to work for us was to make a ritual of walking the perimeter of the property with my buddy off leash, and calling him back when he leaves our property. We'd do this every evening after dinner. Didn't take him long at all to learn what was his yard and what wasn't.
 

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Is your property fenced, if not I would suggest you get it done simply because it means he isnt going to go astray, injure himself or cause problems with neighbours. I live in the countryside and have a high fence around my property I couldnt live without it.
 

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Get the bunnies!
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Lottie lives on a farm with just a short sheep fence (which is electrified to stop the cows), she respects the boundary and has never tested the fence, even though she could easily jump it. She is great with the farm animals too, but still does hunt wild things like birds, rats and hedgehogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks

Thanks for all the great ideas. Yes, we have a high fence all around the property, so that will help with him understanding our property vs. 'outside'. The long lead is a wonderful idea. And keeping him on leash for the first few days. We'll have chickens, so the 'prey drive' question is very applicable to our situation, too.
 

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Thanks for all the great ideas. Yes, we have a high fence all around the property, so that will help with him understanding our property vs. 'outside'. The long lead is a wonderful idea. And keeping him on leash for the first few days. We'll have chickens, so the 'prey drive' question is very applicable to our situation, too.
Are you going to free range them? Or build a coup and yard?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
There is a chicken coop, but they will be loose during the day. We have an inner yard & outer yard. It's possible we can put a separation...
 
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