Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My pup, Milo is 10 months old and in perfect health. Up to date with vaccines, no UTI's etc. He was neutered about 3 weeks ago and is semi house-trained. We have a huge crate that Milo stays in when he can not be supervised. I'm a stay at home mom so most of the time he is out of the crate indoors or outside playing with my other dobie and kids. He is walked and let out often. I don't understand why he still urinates inside the house. It's as though he doesn't even know what he is doing. I catch him all the time and rush outside with him as he is sprinkling his way out the door:confused: Several times he'll go to lay on his bed and just "pee" as he is laying down. Any advise on how I can help him stop this behavior. Should I take him out more than what I do now? On average he goes outside about every 2-3 hrs. He doesnt drink water after 7pm. The problem with the peeing is mostly during the day. He'll pee in his crate from time to time also but that has gotten 95% better.

This problem has been going on since we got him so I know its not the neutering. I understand he's still a puppy also. Just wondering if this is normal or is there something I can do to get him out of this. I think I remember my other doberman-Princess urinating occasionally in the house till she was about 1 but not absolutely sure.
 

·
joie de vivre
Joined
·
11,272 Posts
Some pups just take longer to house/potty train than others, kinda like little kids.

Do you go out with him to make sure he's actually peeing outdoors? Outside is exciting to a young Dobe and if he's out there unsupervised there's a good chance he's getting distracted entertaining himself and he forgets to pee...then he comes back in and settles down and needs to pee.

I would treat him like a baby puppy. Out to potty after naps, meals, and play and every 30-45 minutes otherwise (except when he's sleeping at night). I would also go out with him and make sure he's pottying when he's outside, have a treat with you and as soon as he's done peeing, "Yes! Good boy!" and give him a treat. Don't stand at the door with a treat and call him back to you - then you're just rewarding him for coming to you. Literally go out with him and stand near him until he pees so you can reward him on the spot.

You might also try hanging some bells on the back door so he has a clear way of alerting you when he needs to pee. He may not be sure how to get your attention to go out but if he has bells that ring every time you open the backdoor, he'll catch on that [bells ringing = he gets to go outside].
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
great advice

Thank you, thank you ..I will try the treat thing. Yes I make sure when he is out he pee's but I never give him a treat or make a big deal of it. I will try this and the bells. Thank you so much for the great advice!:nicejob::thanx:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,778 Posts
This is not a housebreaking problem and it is not a puppy problem... this is a There's-Something-Wrong-With-Your-Dog Issue.

I friend of mine posted a video to Youtube some years ago of her ten-DAY old English Shepherd puppies... they crawled (because they couldn't walk, yet) away from the puppy pile to urinate, and then crawled back to their siblings. Ten days old. This is normal behavior for puppies this age.

Your dog needs to have this medically evaluated. If your vet is not concerned, you need another, better vet. Really. Normal dogs do not do this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,778 Posts
For what it is worth, and not sayin' that this is the case here, but I finally remembered what these symptoms reminded me of. A friend of mine who founded a rescue for blind dogs had an animal like this come in. He had I think two ectopic ureters. Surgery was performed, but the dog went into renal failure due to the cumulative damage from having had this condition untreated for so long. He has just had some sort of experimental stem cell treatment which will hopefully restore his kidney function. It sounds like your dog is able to go out and urinate deliberately... this would probably indicate that if he had this structural issue, he would have one ectopic and one normal ureter. Again, not suggesting that this is what is going on with your dog, but your description of what he is doing fits the description of a dog with this birth defect. Here is one website that discusses it: Ectopic ureter, and there are countless others. There is mention made that this is almost exclusively an issue with bitches... the animal that came into my friend's rescue is male.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
134 Posts
I also agree with what mmctaq has said. Something is wrong. No dog will urinate while laying down unless there is something "not right." Could be physical, or it could be nurological.

Seek a second opinion at a different vet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the advice. I will look into this further. Just to clear things up a little. Milo does not only pee when he goes to lay down. This was done several times last week. I was concerned because dogs shouldn't really "go" where they sleep or eat. I'm going to speak to my vet and trainer more about this. Hopefully, it's something I will be able to work him through. Princess wasn't fully potty trained till she was a year or so old. Almost the same thing as Milo except she didn't have a bed till she got older. I appreciate all the advice and surely will get to the bottom of his behavior. Thanks everyone:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ok, I just thought of something. Milo still stays in his crate overnight or when he is not being supervised. Outside his crate is this huge doggy bed. Both Milo and Princess can lay on it. Princess sleeps on it all the time cause she is 100% housebroken and doesn't need to be crated. Is it possible he is pee'ing on the bed cause "technically" it's hers?:confused:
 

·
joie de vivre
Joined
·
11,272 Posts
Sorry, I missed the part about peeing as he lays down. That is not a normal house training issue. I agree with mmctaq and I'd be seeking answers through your vet.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mmctaq
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top