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I have an issue let me know if I am on the wrong side of the fence here KC doberman rescue has put in place a policy that doesn't allow rescues to be placed in homes with children under the age of 5 regardless of breed experience dog temperament or any other factor. The reasoning was that they are big dogs and may knock down small children.

I have never had any problems with my dobes and my son they are wonderful they like playing with him and he with them he has been Knocked over twice once when she was a puppy and had hit a growth spurt and once when someone broke into my house and tried to attack me ( on the way to defend me my son was knocked down.)

This policy makes me angry it makes it so some very eligible dogs can not go to some very eligible homes just because they have children.

I had to vent what do you think
 

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While I think each case should be taken on individual merit, I honestly don't think it is a bad policy at all. It is actually very lenient compared to some which will not home Dobes with kids under 8, 12, 15 etc etc. Rescues have a responsibility to the dogs they place, they need to ensure they are going to the best homes. These dogs may not have been given the proper amount of love and attention from a young age that they deserve and many families with young children can be super busy. You also have to think about things like: What would the average person do when their child aggravates a rescue dog to the point where the dog gives a warning growl/snap? What would the average person do if their toddler was knocked down by accident by a playful larger dog?

The rescue wants a permanent home for each animal they place, and some of the dogs relinquished to rescue are there because of some human error that potentially could have put a child in danger.
 

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One thing you can do is see if one of the volunteers would be willing to spend time with you and your son either at your home or theirs. We don't have a doberman rescue where we live but we do have a great dane rescue that we had volunteered at a couple times where they were able to see how my young at the time kids behaved and interacted with the dogs during adoption days. We also had tons of references from trainers, vets and personal. When it came time for us to actually adopt we had rescues out the whazoo begging for us to look at their dogs or consider fostering and continued to get calls for months afterwards.

You have to consider that most rescues work with "average pet owners" and it is unfortunate that the average pet owner turn dogs around left and right, doesn't hesitate to have the dog PTS, turned into pound or returned to rescue for accidentally bumping into a toddler or forbid they step on a foot or sometimes just trading them in for newer models. There are also many parents who just don't believe in teaching their kids pet manners and let their kids torture and tease their pets and wonder why the dog bit or growled, then the dog has to go. Of course, when they wanted the dog they told everybody how well behaved their kids were with dogs, how much supervision would be going on, the rules that would be followed, etc. Even if you have owned dogs before, they have no clue what kind of parent you are and what kind of pet owner. Some may be very strict in their policy and some may be willing to work with the right family. Their goal is more to find the right family for a particular dog rather than to find the right dog for a particular family. It's up to you though to show them that you are that right family they are looking for.
 

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I am in the KC area and have met Janice. They are very loving and concerded people. They only want the best for you and your children. I tell you with all the dog bite incidents lately with children I feel they are trying to be very responsible in protecting everyone concerned. While it may not fit your situation it does protect all small children.

In this case I would prefer they err on the side of caution. We certainly don't want Dobes to hit the headlines.
 

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Many large breed and working breed rescues have the same policy - IDR + policy is

* All children in the home must be age seven (7) or older. Our goal is to maximize the chances of success for every adoption, and our experience has shown us that this is best accomplished when all children in the family are seven and older. This policy is in place to ensure the safety and well-being of both our rescue dogs and our adoptive families. There are exceptions to this rule, which must be approved by the IDR+ Board of Directors.
 

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Doberman Rescue MN doesn't place dogs in families with children under the age of six. It's for safety as well as to have the best chance of the dog being placed in a "forever" home. Yes, sometimes that means a very qualified applicant misses out on a dog. We hope that people who are very serious about adopting a Doberman will be willing to wait until their kids are old enough.
 
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I think it's an okay rule to have in place, but it's great if they have the resources to make exceptions when appropriate.

When making an exception allows a dog to go to a 95% perfect home, that means another dog can be pulled from a truly dire situation. Yes, no one wants a dog returned or a child bitten, but good pre-adoption screening can minimize the chances of that. And if you have to take a small risk that the home isn't 100% perfect in order to be able to spring another dog from a high-kill shelter who is absolutely going to meet a bad end tomorrow, I think it's worth it to be open to exceptions. The 95% perfect home may end up having to return the dog, but it's more likely they won't. In the meantime, you've saved a dog who was 95% likely to be euthed.

However, working with the general public can make even the kindest person jaded and for good reason. I think most people going through breed rescues are really trying to do the right thing and are likely to be responsible owners, but there are bad eggs out there (especially with a breed this popular and "macho.")

If you are on the side of needing an exception, it's best to be polite to the adoption staff and see if they might be willing to take more time to talk to you and get to know your situation. I know of a lady that recently got turned down for a greyhound adoption because she had intact dogs at home (titled show dogs that she doesn't breed). The person she was working with was not familiar with dog showing and wouldn't make an exception for her. She was frustrated (as she had a huge yard and a lot of experience with sighthounds, so she was actually an ideal home), but she tried to keep communication open and was able to find a group that would make an exception for her.
 

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If you are on the side of needing an exception, it's best to be polite to the adoption staff and see if they might be willing to take more time to talk to you and get to know your situation.

I can't second this enough! Nasty emails and attitude regarding the rules will not get you an exception. People that politely state their case and ask what would need to be done to be considered for an exception usually are.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
They Make No Exception

If you are on the side of needing an exception, it's best to be polite to the adoption staff and see if they might be willing to take more time to talk to you and get to know your situation. I know of a lady that recently got turned down for a greyhound adoption becaue she had intact dogs at home (titled show dogs that she doesn't breed). The person she was working with was not familiar with dog showing and wouldn't make an exception for her. She was frustrated (as she had a huge yard and a lot of experience with sighthounds, so she was actually an ideal home), but she tried to keep communication open and was able to find a group that would make an exception for her.
I was not rude or sarky to the rescues staff I told them I was interested but had a son and wanted to know if they would be interested in meeting with us I was told that that was not something they did there. I am not the regular dog owner that sees dogs as disposable (hell i spent $5600 in "replacement parts" for my bulldog) I get the idea but i was thinking it Should be determined on situation.
 

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I was not rude or sarky to the rescues staff I told them I was interested but had a son and wanted to know if they would be interested in meeting with us I was told that that was not something they did there. I am not the regular dog owner that sees dogs as disposable (hell i spent $5600 in "replacement parts" for my bulldog) I get the idea but i was thinking it Should be determined on situation.
I didn't mean to imply you were being snarky at all. That was more of a general suggestion for others running into the same situation. If you can be open and say, well, I understand where you're coming from, but perhaps you could come see my situation for yourself and see if we might be able to work something out.

Honestly, I totally see both sides of being too strict and more lenient. I think when you're dealing with the number of animals we see euthed in shelters every year, being more lenient isn't always the worst thing. Still, it is hard working with the general public and not eventually feeling like you should just fire bomb the whole population and start over again, haha. Hyperbole, obviously, but I think it's hard to trust people when you are constantly seeing neglected and abused animals coming through your doors.
 

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I was not rude or sarky to the rescues staff I told them I was interested but had a son and wanted to know if they would be interested in meeting with us I was told that that was not something they did there. I am not the regular dog owner that sees dogs as disposable (hell i spent $5600 in "replacement parts" for my bulldog) I get the idea but i was thinking it Should be determined on situation.
you mad bro?
lol sorry just had to say that.
......

I would wait to get your next doberman/dog. It already seems like you have a lot on your plate. With kids, and two dobermans (one that is 9 months, still a puppy).
 

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I was not rude or sarky to the rescues staff I told them I was interested but had a son and wanted to know if they would be interested in meeting with us I was told that that was not something they did there. I am not the regular dog owner that sees dogs as disposable (hell i spent $5600 in "replacement parts" for my bulldog) I get the idea but i was thinking it Should be determined on situation.
The problem is that all "regular dog owners" don't see themselves as regular. Everyone these days seems to think they are special and that rules should be broken just for them. When someone in rescue hears every day about how exeptional someone is, it gets pretty hard to believe especially when you're taking in dogs from these "exceptional" people every day.
 

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While I totally understand their policy in general, I would think if there is an experienced doberman owner, who has had dobermans before, especially for an extended time, they should be willing to meet with and re-evaluate the situation and possibly consider rehoming a doberman with someone in that situation. Thats not to say that it should be an exception ALL the time, but on a case by case determination. Or a one time thing. Policies are in place for a reason, but sometimes there is a special case that the policy can be bent.
 

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Well, here's my thought for anyone who has a problem with how a rescue is operating ... no one is stopping you from starting up your own rescue and YOU can go pick up these dogs from the shelters and pounds and accept drop-offs from former owners who no longer want their Doberman, and then you can make all the exceptions that you want when placing them and run your rescue with a complete lack of rules and policies. What are you waiting for? No one is stopping you!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Reznik I am no longer looking at rescue dobes my 9 month pup was older when I got him. He came from a reputable breeder she had a brain tumor and needed to place some of her dogs quickly. I was just saying it is kinda a weird policy to say this breed of dog is not good with children I get the "this dog" is not good with children thing.

MaryandDobes I don't think we are going to get along I said in my original post that I was willing to hear if I was on the wrong side but while I was at work today you posted two hateful remarks. You know nothing about me we already do breed awareness in our state and have helped re home dobes that suddenly became "disposable" when towns passed bans on dobes. So the start your own rescue comment is totally out of line.
Also let me tell you about jaded I see people turn into vultures as their loved ones are wasting away to nothing and they are in the hall arguing over who is keeping the house. I get that. However YOU ARE OUT OF LINE grouping me with some of these good for nothing people that use dogs as fashion statements. I'm not asking for a no rule rescue I am saying that this policy make the breed look bad. Like they are not safe to be around kids and that is not true. :ranting2:
 

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I respectfully comment that you are taking this wayyyy too personally. My comments are not necessarily directed AT you. They are just comments about the situation, and are based largely on what I experienced when I was active in rescue. The general sense of entitlement is out there, and all too often people expect rules to be broken for them. There are many who have criticized rescues for their various policies, and my comment about being welcome to start your own rescue is directed in a generic way, not necessarily AT you. I mean, if you don't think the shoe fits, don't put it on - it's that easy.

I don't agree that the policy makes the breed look bad. I think it is only in place to protect kids and dogs, and the rescue from certain liabilities. They have to be very careful about what they do if they want to continue to do it, after all, and what they do is pretty important so why take the risk?
 

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MaryandDobes if that is your opinion I can respect it I just ask that if you are making a general statement make it general. What are YOU waiting for and no one is stopping YOU is actually pretty personal. IN my opinion this is not a good way of doing things I do see that there are people on both sides and I guess if they are not willing to do in home evaluations then it is very likely a good way to approach . When we have help place dis-guarded dogs it was done on a case by case bases I just figure an organized rescue would do things in a similar way. :boldblue:
 

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"you" in colloquial speech, can also be read as a general collective 'you' (and usually is)

....just sayin' ;)
 
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