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$700 to ship, is this driving? We had small breed rescues come from Egypt for $800, now that price has gone up to $1,200 on the excuse of Covid & reduced flights.

I have a Euro, which requires more than a North American on average. However did this breeder ask you any questions such as your experience? Children? What your looking for so he can select the right pup? Again, not saying this is one to be concerned about but Euro dobies are on average even more expensive.

You made the call and already paid your deposit, yes? So, as members above pointed out some concerns it is a done deal. Just note if it does turn out some big red flags with this breeder yet to be discovered I would walk away and write that deposit off.

When are you expecting your new family member? If you haven't yet I suggest taking a good read over at the puppy forums so you can better prepare yourself for the good and not so good hehe. Not knowing your experience they are not the easiest breed... will be almost entirely up to you on how he/she will be as an adult, and if you hang in there you will not find a better, loyal, best friend, & natural guard dog.

Everyone here is happy to help & share ideas/tips/experiences so hang around!
I'm expecting my pup late November to early october. She was born late September.
I think my 3 priorities for a doberman would be 1. temperament 2. health 3. appearance rated accordingly. And I know for sure this breeder wouldn't be a good choice regarding to at least the health part. My budget for the dog was 2000-3000 usd, since i'm a college student (graduating next summer) and that would be the maximum I can afford for a dog, and annually I can spend 4000usd on the dog (including its insurance etc.), and after I graduate probably 6000usd annually + 4000 emergency fee. I live in NY and searched up a some reputable breeders like Raindance Dobermans or Kevlar Dobermans, but their pups are too expensive, 4500-5000 minimum. It's like I know lambos are great but I only have the money for a mustang kinda thing, you gotta use the money according to how much you make...

Any recommendations for breeders that are within my affordable price range? I do consider all messages here it's just as I have said I am a total amateur when it comes to owning a dobe. So I gotta take more time to compare and hear everyone's experience.

That being said I am very thankful for everyone who replied to my post
 

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In yours shoes I'd wait until after I graduated. Puppies don't leave much time for studying anything but them.

Just can't help piping up here to say if the price of a puppy is a big consideration for you, get online and add up the cost of beds, crates, toys, chews, etc. Then check out the price of good quality food. Also be sure to get your puppy good health insurance the day you get it. If your puppy is AKC, they offer a free 30-day policy. Take them up on it while you're deciding what to sign up for after the 30 days. It paid off for my puppy and for his littermate whose owner and I stay in touch.

I'm pretty sure if I added up my vet bills for my puppy (not a Doberman but German Pinscher and also priced right up there), they'd come close to the purchase price. Vets are expensive just for vaccinations these days. My puppy hasn't even been sick. He had vaccinations, titers, some problems like grass seeds in ears and me worrying about whether his lower permanent canines were coming in properly enough to take him to a vet dentist - dog health insurance doesn't cover dental.

Also have to say in another breed I was warned you can't trust a word the Russians say about their dogs. I have no idea how true that is as I've never dealt with a Russian over anything, much less a dog, but I know from checking Rottweiler pedigrees in Russia and places like Serbia they don't do as much health testing as in the U.S., and they act as if bitches don't count and aren't worth even bothering with minimal testing on.
 

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Others have offered some great advice, but I'd just like to chime in a little.
I'm glad you've thought through a budget of what you can afford in dollars. I would also think hard about how much time you can afford to give to the puppy daily.
I'm also a first time Doberman owner, picked up my pup in Oregon and drove him back to New Hampshire. The first year is incredibly expensive and time consuming.
If I had to guess, I'd guess that all in after a year I've probably spent over $10k on/for him(not including insurance).
Before becoming a Doberman owner, having spent countless hours researching, going out and meeting other Dobermans and Dobe owners, all of that went out the window on day 2.
The time I spend with Nello training, exercising both his body and mind is quite a bit. I'd say around an hour a day just for physical exercise, not including various forms/types of training. If there is one thing I've learned over this past year, is Dobes need some type of job for mental stimulation. they are very smart, and when they get bored and/or under exercised(mental & physical), they can become destructive.

I don't mean to talk you out of getting a Doberman, after owning one I personally don't think I could ever own another breed. Nello has become so much more than a pet, more like a son, wouldn't trade him for anything and I'd do anything for him. The breed is amazing, but very time and dollar consuming.

Do you have any experience with working breeds?
And I guess the point I'm trying to make in regards to your original question, is that a healthy Doberman with good temperament is expensive. But an unhealthy and/or poor temperament can be even more expensive over time. The breeder seems to be relatively new..? bottom of their website says copywrite 2021. I also see no advertised titles on their dogs...?

I think you said you were in college. Not sure if anyone else has mentioned it, but a rescue might be something worth considering. Their are a number of good Doberman rescues around the country. They're less expensive and an older Dobe might be easier while your in school. Or maybe not, don't know your situation or time budget. Just throwing it out there.

Good luck, and I hope it all works out well for you.
 

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I've always put it this way with folks in college, or demanding jobs or whatever--and someone came close to it in their post above--but basically, it is possible to make room for college and a puppy (though sometimes very very tough and not optimal for either of you) but if you want a social life too? It tends to be one or the other.

In other words--if you want to go out on dates, to movies, lunch etc two or three days a week, you've got the puppy to deal with. Something has to give. If you're lucky, the SO you have likes things like hiking and you can bring the puppy along (or the date along, depending on your priorities.) But short trips, spending the night somewhere, anything of that sort, can be really tough. You can't always have a friend who will allow you to bring the dog along, or activities that dogs can join in (or maybe you can. LOL I don't know your situation)

It really is like having baby (human baby)--except it's probably easier to find a babysitter than a dog sitter.

The other thing that you have to consider is where you might be living after you get out of school (city, suburban, lots of outdoor activities near, city sidewalks only--you can't rely on dog park or doggie daycare with a dobe), and what kind of housing you will need. Apartments that allow large dogs can be tough to find--and if your dog is a doberman? Sometimes it's almost impossible--they're on most "vicious dog" lists 🙁 Naturally people face moves all of the time, just as a part of life, but to go into dog owning KNOWING that you have a move ahead of you in a year or so is kinda in a different place in terms of looking ahead and planning.

You CAN generally make it work if you really really are determined to, but it is easy to overestimate what your enthusiasm level will be after your cute little puppy is adolescent and a pain in the butt and you have to change your situation because he has a bad habit of barking too much or eating the drywall or something. Most people start out saying "I CAN handle all of the difficulties involved" but when it comes down to it, it can be a real struggle. And a lot of the time that means the dog suffers.

I'm not saying you're in that group--I don't know you--but it is something to be aware of.
 

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I google mapped it--of course, it depends on where in NY you are and where in IN the breeder is--but 11 hours is well within what you can expect. One way.
 

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This is of concern to me: Puppy price is $2200 . Price includes ears cropped, tails docked,limited akc registration,microchipped, first shots and wormed dew claws removed.


A Dobie puppy, and more so IMO a Euro one is quite the commitment. You sure you'll be able to have the time especially in the formative months for him/her? In your case, being busy with college you may not have the time or energy to keep up the mental & physical daily work?

Have you considered adopting a Dobie instead? One that is a little grown, a reputable rescue group can match you up to the one that best suits your needs & wants. Just a thought.

I don't want to discourage you, but people get overwhelmed trying to handle & raise a Dobie puppy. If you feel confident, and willing to do what's needed there are reputable breeders on here as members and plenty of reviews & recommendations for both in US and Canada. Just be aware, a good one will ask questions, may even have requirements such as a recommended dog trainer and even decline your application. Also be aware the good ones often have waiting lists, and even take a while to get a response.

All I can say as before, if you do it right and have the patience you will get a healthy loyal best friend that all your work will be more than worth it!
 

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"I think my 3 priorities for a doberman would be 1. temperament 2. health 3. appearance rated accordingly "

What has the breeder done to prove these three things?

Temperament can be tested for and proven through things like obedience titles, IGP titles, and other performance titles as well as certifications such as temperament tests, Working Ability Evaluations, Canine Good Citizen tests, etc. What has actually been done?

Health - you've been asked before but you just keep skipping over it except for DCM genetic testing, I presume. If it's #2 on your list, why are you skipping over it?

Appearance - what has the breeder done to prove the merits of these dogs' conformation? I have eyes, I can see the faults but a newbie doesn't. Breed surveys? Conformation shows - AKC, UDC? Anything?

Or are working reproduction systems enough?
 

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and annually I can spend 4000usd on the dog (including its insurance etc.), and after I graduate probably 6000usd annually + 4000 emergency fee.
Just popping back in to state that this thread made me curious to see how close to $10k I was for my first year of Doberman ownership. Between regular vet visits, puppy issues seen by vet (giardia, staph, neutering, etc.), food, accessories, toys, training, grooming supplies, and one boarding event the total was over $12k.

4k seems awfully low and not a lot of wiggle room should something happen.
 

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Just popping back in to state that this thread made me curious to see how close to $10k I was for my first year of Doberman ownership. Between regular vet visits, puppy issues seen by vet (giardia, staph, neutering, etc.), food, accessories, toys, training, grooming supplies, and one boarding event the total was over $12k.

4k seems awfully low and not a lot of wiggle room should something happen.

I'm with MMcCown and NellosDad on this one. We have only had our dobie since end of February/early March and we have spent at least $8,000 on him and that's only in a span of 7ish months! Not only are dobies incredibly expensive, but they are super time consuming. Luckily my husband has a good job and our pet insurance is amazing, but I also left my job before the pandemic started last year, so I am a stay at home wifey and I spend a lot of time with him - training, mentally stimulating him, playing games, etc.

In any case, good luck!!
 

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So Leo (Fort Bellators Rain Dancer) is a young dog working in IGP, whose owner has done all the appropriate health testing. I have a friend with a very well bred American showline bitch who earned her French Ring 1 who intends on breeding to him.

However this particular breeder, and the dam seem to be lacking adequate health testing, to say nothing of titling.

so while the breeder isn't a "scam" for the amount you'd be paying you can do a lot better. You say health and temperament are your priorities but you are choosing a breeder who is cutting corners on health, and not doing anything to prove temperament of the dams, then paying a stud fee to hopefully ride on the coattails of the stud owner.

But even with the stud owner having a BH on the dog unless you've spoken to the stud owner you don't really know anything about temperament, titles are so context dependent.

And finally appearance - as MAD said... even if you don't have a competitive AKC show dog... you can get written evaluations, you can go through the UDC breed survey or the UDC conformation venue which comes with a score sheet of attributes, with faults and qualities for an overall assessment (and frequently, from an AKC judge).
 

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Agree with Rosemary, just not info on the page to make me wish to purchase. And a lot of visuals that would steer me clear.

The conformation of Dunja is pretty abysmal, imo. A pet who is being bred. The feet on Thedra are awful. The nails are unkempt - these are things that newbies just don't notice. They've got 2 litters on the ground right now. They just had a litter that went home in July. I think we can see what means the most to them. Breeding untitled dogs and making money.

No dog is DCM clear - the DNA tests might be clear, but they mean little in actual fact. The DNA tests are for 2 of the genes maybe responsible in part for DCM, but not all of them so clear parentage does not mean that puppies will not get DCM later. Do you understand that, eggmono? Have you studied the pedigree and learned the ages and causes of death in the last 5 generations? Has the breeder provided this to you? Is that all of the health testing done? Do you understand that there is a LOT more health testing that should be done and provided to you? Hips, elbows, vWD, thyroid, eyes, liver, cardiac ultrasounds / Holter monitoring, etc?
This was a great response and all of my responses as well. When I got my first doberman 11 years ago I knew nothing and that is why this community is so helpful. I learned the same thing by coming across reputable breeders who told me being on AKC marketplace means nothing.
 
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