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I've been looking into get a dog (for quite awhile) and the Doberman is the next breed on my list to look into. If anyone can tell me if this breed would suit me or perhaps guide me a little bit on my decision that would be great.

Anyhow, I'm a college student and I'm usualy gone for 4-5 hours for work then come home for an hour or so then head to class for 2-3 hours then I'm mostley at home for the rest of the night. I don't work weekends but I usualy hang out with friends or have them come over for part of the day. I also rent housing as I can't afford a house of my own right now and every single place I've had doesn't have a fensed yard so I doubt I will get one in the future. I also live with three other roommate and plan to atleast have one other roommate until I get my own place.

So now that you know a little about my situation my questions are:
1) Does the doberman handle being alone for hours at a time? I don't want to make my neighbor angry by having a whiney dog.
2) Is not having a yard really ok? I was planning on walking the dog for 30 minutes to an hour on weekdays and then taking him/her to the park on weekends.
3) Are dobermans friendly? I know there is always the view that they hate everyone except thier masters (tv, movies, etc) but from the reading I know this not to be true. What I really want to know is how they react to guests.
4) Would raising a puppy be a horrible idea? I've looked at the local rescues and I didn't find something that suited me so I figure the next best thing would to be getting one from a breeder. I also have had experiance with dogs before (grew up with a weimaraner).

I'm sure there is some I forgot to ask (there always is) but those are my major questions. If there are other concerns or questions for me then feel free to ask.

Thanks much for bearing with my long post.
-Sean
 

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Hi and welcome to the forum..its great you are finding out abit more about the breed before making your final decision.. ive tried to answer your questions below but may not have covered everything and plus im in abit of a hurry as im going out soon...also these are just my opinions so others may differ from mine and others will probably think of things i didnt ..i still early in the morning here in the u.k :)

1) a doberman can handle being alone but not for very long hours..they are velcro dogs and enjoy the company of their owner.
2) my personal opinion on this one is i woudlnt get a doberman if i did not have a yard ..i enjoy harvey having the space when im at home to chill out in the garden or come in and relax when he feels like it. If you are planning on walking the dog i would walk it for aslong as you can..more towards an hour than a just 30 minutes...some dogs work fine on 30 minutes ..but each dobie is different ... for my harvey to relax i have to give him a real fast pace walk and off-lead running for an hour so he comes back panting and eager to relax..exercise relieves the dog of stress and tension...but i live in the area where he can do that. If you do not walk your dog and he gets anxious about you leaving and gets bored in the apartment you could come back to some serious destruction..
3) Again this is my opinion and othes may differ..
Dobermanns are generally aloof to someone very new and will most probably bark at them but raised properly will not be aggresive ..they will often stand back watch whats happening and then decide whether he can be bothered saying hello...my dobie was abused and has never acted aggresive.
Some dobermanns are aggressive due to them being owned by an someone who hasnt done all their homework and doesnt realise the time it takes to socialise etc . this is generally not the dogs fault just the humans. Some dobermanns are 'aggressive' as they are trained to be a proffesional guard dog..again thre is nothing wrong with this as long as they are trained by a proffesional..not something any joe public should attempt. Unfortunalty in the 70's-80's the doberman was used alot in films ..their size, bark, and whole look of them with the cropped ears etc was exactly what movie makers were looking for in the role of 'scary dog'..i remeber them on a JAmes Bond MOvie. They are generally not the kind of dog that will wag its tail and jump all over the stranger thats just enteretd you house. They are meant to be watchfull, alert, fearless, etc but after awhile they become very friendly to new faces.
4) In my mind it would be just as hard to get a puppy than a rescue..they require lots of time love and training and rescues can somtimes come with 'baggage' that need sorting out and further training which means more money.

there is also the food bills ..they require a quality food as with any dog and there is also the amount they eat. There is also training and socialisation classes and a crate or cage to house your puppy/dog safely whilst you are out. Im not sure how you feel about crating as peoples views differ. They also need to be house trained and trained for a crate. There are vacinations and insurance which i would advise to get. this is not a full list as their are lots of bits and pieces in between which could cost money like treats and leads and collars , micro chipping your dog so it could be found in the event of it getting loose etc.

~Also does you landlord allow pets? (not sure if you have checked this out yet)
~what characteristics were you looking for in a dog? how much time do you have to devote to grooming and maitenance etc.
 

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I also rent housing as I can't afford a house of my own right now and every single place I've had doesn't have a fensed yard so I doubt I will get one in the future. I also live with three other roommate and plan to atleast have one other roommate until I get my own place.
Both Ava's breeder and the rescue group I had looked into both required that you owned your own home before they'd even consider letting me have a dog. I think most reputable breeders and rescues want people who own their home for obvious reasons.
 

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1) Any dog can be fine left alone for long periods of time. Lilarrow had pyper in her crate for 8 hours(while at work) and she was perfectly fine. there was no barking at all. Its all in the training.

2)Dobe's are perfectly happy living in an apartment and without a yard. Mine sure is. I take him out for walks, sometimes 5 min, sometimes a couple house. as long as they get enough exercise they will be fine.should be a

3)Dobe's are definatly goofy, but they are working dogs, that is what they are bred for, and that is what they will always be. Without proper socialization, training and owner, a dobe could be a dangerous dog. im not trying to scare you, but lets be honest...We are talking about an 60-80 pound dog here, and if not properly socialized/trained, it can do some serious damage. I know first hand that a poor owner(myself) creats an agressive dog. I didnt socialize him properly, and when he started to become a bit agressive, i got frustrated which only made things worse. Now, i dont agree that everyone who has an agressive dog is an "idiot" because there are a ton of other reasons that can cause agression in dogs other than how it is raised. It is not always the fault of the humans but medical conditions instead. King is real agressive with people he doesnt know. he will bark like a wild dog(although if they were to talk up to him he probably run away like the coward he is), but once he gets to know that person, you wont be able to get him to stop kissing you. Again, socialization is key, but that can only take you so far. getting a dog from a reputable breeder that breeds dogs with sound temperments has a lot to do with it.

4)Puppies are a LOT of work but a rescue can be a lot of work too. like twinkletoes said, rescues sometimes come with baggage.


Now, you also need to keep in mind that dobe's do carry the "bad dog" image. that could hurt your chances of finding a place if you need to move, people may refuse to come over, and you may get some uneducated people making rude comments about your dog. If you choose to crop its ears, be prepared to get a LOT of negative feedback. I get people telling me im cruel daily. obvisouly i dont need to mention food because you probably know about that since you are looking for a large breed dog. Keep in mind, what goes in, must come out. since you dont have a yard, you are going to need to keep bags with you to pick it up. Not only because its the law, but because it is the right thing to do. Also, id recommend you getting in contact with any and all dobe breeders in your area to get to know the dog in person. reading a book or our post will give you some good insight, but being aroudn the dog and seeing it in person will really let you know if this breed is for you.
Dobes are HIGHLY intelligent. if they can, they will find a way to manipulate you. they will get into anything and everything they are not supposed to. if you dont keep their minds occupied, you could end up with some torn up clothes or worse yet, furnature. my aunts dog tugged the couch into the dining room and ripped half the couch apart because he was bored. they need to have things to do.

thats my .02
 

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I am very impressed that you are researching your breeds and applaud you for that. If I may ask what all breeds are you interested in?

The posts here pretty much sum it up, dobies are notoriously velcro dogs that are happiest with their owner. They can get along well and accept many people in their lives, however you may be happier and better off with the liability factor with a different dog that doesn't have the protection drive of a doberman.

What a few people have mentioned about breeders wanting people to own their own homes is true. For one there are many home insurances that don't cover a doberman, and a reputable breeder will be concerned about where their puppy will end up in a few years.

Dobermans have many health problems that can affect the breed and really put a damper on quality of life, so if you've ruled out a rescue I can only stress that you would go to a reputable breeder, and not someone selling dobermans in the local paper. Which brings us to the problem above of a reputable breeder and the apartment issue.

All and all, JIMO, I'd keep up the good work and look into other breeds.
 

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Thanks everyone for the informative comments. They are mostley what I expected to hear so thats good.

At this point my only real concerns are the bad-dog image and the fact that I might raise a bad dog. I think I could pull it off tho. A lot of places here do have breed restrictions on what kinda pet you can have which I'm sure would put a damper on thing, although I heard of people telling thier landlords that thier dog was a mixed breed when it was realyl a GSD and they didn't know (not sure if I would like to lie like that however). I'll just have to think about this some more.

As for other breeds I'm interested in, well I've basically just been going down the list at dogbreedinfo.com and checking out dogs that fit my critera. Right now the only other breed that I feel may be a match is the welsh corgi, but I have a lot of other breeds to look into still. My problem is that I like the personality of the high energy dogs but don't feel I could take care of one in my state (huskies, old english sheepdog, malamutes, etc).

I'll add more to this when I return from work but I'm gonna be late if I don't stop typing. Thanks again for the input.
 

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Hi Sean! I'm actually a college student/dobie mommy myself. So this is just my experience...I agree with TomandKing, you don't necessarily need a fenced yard, IF you're willing to take the time to properly exercise your dog. I live in an apartment, but there's a huge park down the street that I take Apollo to every day. I have an abnoxiously long leash (100ft)that I put him on so he's free to run around, yet I can still reel him in if need be. I also take him for two long walks each day (1hr 1/2ish), and about a zillion mini (just around the block) walks whenever I can. He loves being outside.

As for new people...I think socialization does wonders. The more you expose your puppy to, the better, and the less likely he'll be to react aggressively to a new situation. At first, Apollo would back away from people whenever they tried to pet him. When they backed away from him, he'd go up to them and sniff. Then someone suggested a brilliant idea...So now I have taught him to sit when people want to pet him, and I would have them give him treats in the beginning. So now if someone asks to pet him I have him sit and he's fine with it, and the treats have been replaced with lots of praise. When people come over, he will cautiously walk over to them and sniff. If he doesn't know them, I'll say "He/She's ok Apollo." Then I ask him to sit. He never barks or jumps up on people. Although, he will demand to be played with if it's someone he knows well, like my sister. So it's my experience that he's not your typical "runs up to everyone begging to be petted" type dog.

Raising a puppy is A LOT of work. I brought my puppy home at 11 weeks old, and have now had him for about a month and a half. You don't realize just how much goes into raising a puppy until you actually get started. First of all, there's housebreaking...excessive chewing...mouthing...constant need for attention...vet visits...buying food/toys...puppy proofing everything...the list goes on. When I decided to get another dog my parents were worried, and I said, "It's not like I'm having a baby!"...I was wrong. But although I've had my moments of frustration (especially in the first week), I absolutely love him to pieces, and I'm so happy I decided on getting a Doberman.

I know money is also an important issue for college students. Luckily, I have school paid for through scholarships and grants, so I basically just work for the puppy and for pizza :) Puppies can be rather expensive (vet, food, toys, replacing chewed/dammaged items, obedience classes...the puppy himself). I've started obedience training myself but he'll be starting real classes in January. Basic obedience training at least, is definitely necessary, and keeping his mind occupied is also a must (treat balls are glorious!).

I'm having a mind blank of anything else I could tell you...so just let me know if you have any other questions about a college dobie's life and I'd be happy to share any other experiences I've had. Hope this was helpful!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Again, thanks for all the information. While I'm still interested in getting doberman sometime in the future I'm leaning towards not getting one right now. I talked to my landlord about getting a dog and looked arround the internet at apartments. My landlord said that he usualy doesn't allow bigger dogs as they tear up stuff more and the fact that there is no yard. Apartments usualy say small dogs only or a weight limit of 25 pounds or so. So my conclusion is that if I get a doberman I'm gonna have a harder time finding a place and it might be too expensive or in a bad location for me. I'm fine with waiting till I finaly buy a place to get a bigger dog, for now I'm looking more closely at that corgi and a few terrier breeds.

Thanks for your guys time and help,
-Sean
 

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wow Seoushi you are definatly a breath of fresh air ..i see so many posts around the web from people who ask for advice and dont listen when people write back something they may not want to hear and it all turns nasty lol..well done for researching and taking the advice from everyone. Its a shame you cannot own a Dobie as they are fantastic but its even better that you are looking realisticly at you life right now and realising nows not the best time for a dobie let alone a large breed..some people just go ahead with it and it all ends in tears. :)
 

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Yeah, I didn't want to be one of those people who just rush into getting a dog thinking thier life will be the same and all they have to do is feed him/her. Generaly I tend to research things before I get too involved, I guess being an Engineer does that to you hah. Thanks for the compliments (everyone that gave them).

-Sean
 

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Hi Seoushi, if more people did exactly what you are doing with your research, there would very few dogs (of any breed) in Rescue! I get so teary when I read the excuses that people come up with when they hand in their dogs. I'm sure that there are some very genuine ones, but some of them, grrrr. I'd be on assault charges......"Oh, I didn't realise that he/she would grow so big".......Slap! :sadcry:

Good luck with your decision.
 

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Twinkletoes said:
Hi and welcome to the forum..its great you are finding out abit more about the breed before making your final decision.. ive tried to answer your questions below but may not have covered everything and plus im in abit of a hurry as im going out soon...also these are just my opinions so others may differ from mine and others will probably think of things i didnt ..i still early in the morning here in the u.k :)

1) a doberman can handle being alone but not for very long hours..they are velcro dogs and enjoy the company of their owner.
2) my personal opinion on this one is i woudlnt get a doberman if i did not have a yard ..i enjoy harvey having the space when im at home to chill out in the garden or come in and relax when he feels like it. If you are planning on walking the dog i would walk it for aslong as you can..more towards an hour than a just 30 minutes...some dogs work fine on 30 minutes ..but each dobie is different ... for my harvey to relax i have to give him a real fast pace walk and off-lead running for an hour so he comes back panting and eager to relax..exercise relieves the dog of stress and tension...but i live in the area where he can do that. If you do not walk your dog and he gets anxious about you leaving and gets bored in the apartment you could come back to some serious destruction..
3) Again this is my opinion and othes may differ..
Dobermanns are generally aloof to someone very new and will most probably bark at them but raised properly will not be aggresive ..they will often stand back watch whats happening and then decide whether he can be bothered saying hello...my dobie was abused and has never acted aggresive.
Some dobermanns are aggressive due to them being owned by an someone who hasnt done all their homework and doesnt realise the time it takes to socialise etc . this is generally not the dogs fault just the humans. Some dobermanns are 'aggressive' as they are trained to be a proffesional guard dog..again thre is nothing wrong with this as long as they are trained by a proffesional..not something any joe public should attempt. Unfortunalty in the 70's-80's the doberman was used alot in films ..their size, bark, and whole look of them with the cropped ears etc was exactly what movie makers were looking for in the role of 'scary dog'..i remeber them on a JAmes Bond MOvie. They are generally not the kind of dog that will wag its tail and jump all over the stranger thats just enteretd you house. They are meant to be watchfull, alert, fearless, etc but after awhile they become very friendly to new faces.
4) In my mind it would be just as hard to get a puppy than a rescue..they require lots of time love and training and rescues can somtimes come with 'baggage' that need sorting out and further training which means more money.

there is also the food bills ..they require a quality food as with any dog and there is also the amount they eat. There is also training and socialisation classes and a crate or cage to house your puppy/dog safely whilst you are out. Im not sure how you feel about crating as peoples views differ. They also need to be house trained and trained for a crate. There are vacinations and insurance which i would advise to get. this is not a full list as their are lots of bits and pieces in between which could cost money like treats and leads and collars , micro chipping your dog so it could be found in the event of it getting loose etc.

~Also does you landlord allow pets? (not sure if you have checked this out yet)
~what characteristics were you looking for in a dog? how much time do you have to devote to grooming and maitenance etc.


I agree with most of what she says, but especially on the fact that they arent gonna greet every stranger like best pals, do u like that fact? Even my 4 month old stands back and observes, they have a great sense of smelling out a threat, this type of Dog will make u safe when u go on walks, i just recently found proof in that. They are the only breed that was bred to protect humans
 
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